K-State Research and Extension News
September 12, 2012
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"In the News" April 2012 Archive



K-State Extension Veterinarian Addresses BSE Discovery
4-27-12 - Rural Messenger - Larry Hollis
A Kansas State University veterinarian wants consumers to know that the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s discovery of a sick cow in California shows that the meat inspection system in the United States works.


BSE Cow More Than 10 Years Old

4-27-12 - DTN/Progressive Farmer
The California dairy cow found to have bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was 10 years and 7 months old and came from a dairy farm in Tulare County, Calif., according to USDA.


K-State veterinarian addresses BSE discovery
4-26-12 - Midwest Producer - Larry Hollis
A Kansas State University veterinarian wants consumers to know that the USDA's discovery of a sick cow in California shows that the meat inspection system in the United States works.


Rare Finding in California Proves New Meat Inspection System is Working
4-26-12 - KMAN Radio - Larry Hollis
An atypical form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was found in a sick cow in California on Tuesday.


Agriculture Today Radio Program Thursday, April 26
4-26-12 - KKOW AM Radio
K-State feedlot nutritionist Chris Reinhardt talks about mitigating heat stress in feedlot cattle, by properly preparing feeding pens before summer takes hold...this includes mounding the lot to improve air flow and using shades to reduce solar exposure.


K-State Extension Veterinarian Addresses BSE Discovery
4-25-12 - Beef Magazine - Larry Hollis
A Kansas State University veterinarian wants consumers to know that the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s discovery of a sick cow in California shows that the meat inspection system in the United States works.


BSE case reveals effective firewall in U.S. food animal system
4-25-12 - Drovers Cattle Network - Larry Hollis
K-State beef veterinarian Larry Hollis comments on Tuesday's report from the USDA on the discovery of BSE in a California dairy cow, the facts of the situation, and how it illustrates the effectiveness of the livestock disease "firewall" in the U.S. food animal system.


Aphids apparent in Kansas wheat
4-23-12 - High Plains Journal - Jeff Whitworth
Early April brought more than warm weather to Kansas farms. Aphid populations increased around the state due to immigration of the insects from the south and local reproduction, according to a Kansas State University entomologist.


June Wheat Plot Tour planned

4-23-12 - High Plains Journal
K-State Research and Extension will host the annual Wheat Plot Tour at the North Central Experiment Field near Belleville, Kan. on June 6.


Proper soil management needed to combat climate change
4-19-12 - Drovers Cattle Network - Chuck Rice
Soils and plants play a significant role in global climate change, said Chuck Rice, K-State university distinguished professor of agronomy.


K-State's DeWolf: Do You Need Fungicide?

4-19-12 - Kansas Wheat - Erick DeWolf
The wheat crop in Kansas is generally considered to be ahead of schedule thanks to warmer than normal temperatures in March.


Cattle Price Drop Not All to Do with LFTB

4-16-12 - CattleSite - Glynn Tonsor
Given recent historic highs in cattle prices, it shouldn’t have been surprising to see values dip somewhat during March, but consumer response to news of lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) in the nation’s meat supply hit cattle and beef values harder than many could have anticipated, according to a Kansas State University agricultural economist.


Planning ahead for severe weather can help keep families safe
4-16-12 - Drovers Cattle Network - Mary Knapp
Severe weather season is upon us and Kansans have compelling reasons to be prepared, according to Mary Knapp, who serves as the state’s climatologist.


Ag minute: Aphids apparent in Kansas wheat, but natural predators at work
4-16-12 - McPherson Sentinel - Jeff Whitworth
Early April brought more than warm weather to Kansas farms. Aphid populations increased around the state due to immigration of the insects from the south and local reproduction, according to a Kansas State University entomologist.


Kansas State Specialist: Cattle Price Pullback Was Likely Even Before LFTB Discussion
4-16-12 - Agri Marketing - Glynn Tonsor
Given recent historic highs in cattle prices, it shouldn't have been surprising to see values dip somewhat during March, but consumer response to news of lean, finely textured beef in the nation's meat supply hit cattle and beef values harder than many could have anticipated, according to a Kansas State University agricultural economist.


LFTB Headlines Wane—Industry Challenges Remain
4-15-12 - Beef Magazine - Glynn Tonsor
There are too many moving parts to say with certainty how much the furor over lean finely textured beef (LFTB) will ultimately cost beef demand and for how long. Related economic dominos continue to fall, though.


Ag minute: Cattle price pullback was likely even before LFTB discussion
4-13-12 - McPherson Sentinel - Glynn Tonsor
Given recent historic highs in cattle prices, it shouldn’t have been surprising to see values dip somewhat during March, but consumer response to news of lean, finely textured beef in the nation’s meat supply hit cattle and beef values harder than many could have anticipated, according to a Kansas State University agricultural economist.

Cattle price pullback was likely even before LFTB discussion
4-13-12 - Drovers Cattle Network - Glynn Tonsor
Given recent historic highs in cattle prices, it shouldn’t have been surprising to see values dip somewhat during March, but consumer response to news of lean, finely textured beef in the nation’s meat supply hit cattle and beef values harder than many could have anticipated, according to a Kansas State University agricultural economist.

K-State Research and Extension Schedules Canola Tours in Several Locations
4-11-12 - Grain Net - Mike Stamm
Kansas farmers will have several opportunities to get a first-hand look at canola fields and research plots in Kansas during the Canola Field Tours scheduled this spring, said Mike Stamm, K-State Research and Extension canola breeder.


Study Paves Way for Safer Insect Control
4-10-12 - The Crop Site - Kun Yan Zhu
A Kansas State University researcher’s work has shed new light on which of two genes present in many insect species should be targeted for new insecticides that will be safer for humans and the environment than those currently used.


Kansas State scientist’s study paves ways for new insect control methods
4-10-12 - Agro News - Kun Yan Zhu
A Kansas State University researcher's work has shed new light on which of two genes present in many insect species should be targeted for new insecticides that will be safer for humans and the environment than those currently used.

Kansas State Scientist's Study Paves Way for New Insect Control Methods
4-10-12 - Agri Marketing - Kun Yan Zhu
A Kansas State University researcher's work has shed new light on which of two genes present in many insect species should be targeted for new insecticides that will be safer for humans and the environment than those currently used.


Kansas State University scientists’ study paves the way for safer insect control
4-9-12 - Seed Quest - Kun Yan Zhu
A Kansas State University researcher’s work has shed new light on which of two genes present in many insect species should be targeted for new insecticides that will be safer for humans and the environment than those currently used.


Research builds on previous ‘breakthrough’ study
4-9-12 - Drovers Cattle Network - Kun Yan Zhu
A Kansas State University researcher’s work has shed new light on which of two genes present in many insect species should be targeted for new insecticides that will be safer for humans and the environment than those currently used.

Kansas Profile - Now That's Rural - Grains for Hope - Carol Spangler
4-5-12 - Gardner Edge - Ron Wilson
Palm Springs, California. It's the site of the national meeting of the American Association of Cereal Chemists.


Study reinforces that fallow aids wheat

4-4-12 - Midwest Producer - Rob Aiken
Farmers in semiarid western Kansas have known since the Dust Bowl days of the 1930s that incorporating a fallow period into wheat cropping systems is beneficial for wheat productivity.


Burning CRP land can provide benefits
4-3-12 - Farm Talk - Walt Fick
Requirements for prescribed burning of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contracts have changed since last year, said Walt Fick, K-State Research and Extension rangeland management specialist.


K-State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well-being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K-State campus, Manhattan.

Story by: Elaine Edwards
elainee@ksu.edu
K-State Research & Extension News