K-State Research and Extension News
The Wheat Scoop is a weekly news feature from the Kansas Wheat Commission to inform wheat farmers, the grain industry and the public about the marketing and utilization of Kansas wheat. Scoops cover a wide range of topics, from breeding new wheat varieties to domestic and international utilization, as well as new uses, nutrition, and trends in domestic and international wheat foods and wheat flour consumption.
Wheat Scoops
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Consumers’ rising interest in their food supply is also a grand opportunity for the wheat industry to put its best foot forward, using all forms of media to tell about wheat-based foods. Marsha Boswell has more in this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop. 

- 10/24/2014
The second largest U.S. hard red winter market in the world is not overseas, but just across this country’s southern border.  Marsha Boswell talks about the importance for that market to Kansas wheat producers, on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

- 10/16/2014
Dr. Norman Borlaug’s semi-dwarf wheat spurred the Green Revolution and saved more than a billion lives from starvation. The 2014 World Food Prize, which Borlaug created, is being awarded to a wheat researcher for the first time…and it happens to be Borlaug’s successor.  Marsha Boswell has more on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.                                        

- 10/10/2014
What would it take for celiacs to be able to have their wheat — and eat it too?  That is exactly what a K-State researcher hopes to achieve in a research project funded by Kansas wheat farmers through the Kansas Wheat Commission.  Marsha Boswell has more.

- 10/3/2014
Entries for the 2015 National Festival of Breads, a popular bread-baking contest co-sponsored by the Kansas Wheat Commission, are now being accepted. Marsha Boswell has more on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Very soon now, wheat growers in the western part of the state can determine who will represent them on the Kansas Wheat Commission for the next three years.  Marsha Boswell has more on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

- 9/19/2014
The 2014 Kansas State Fair is in the books, and it was another successful event for Kansas Wheat, in promoting and educating about the state’s number-one crop.  Marsha Boswell offers a recap on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

- 9/12/2014
On September 11, Kansas Wheat honored the winners of the Wheat Yield Contest and the Wheat Quality Initiative Contest. This year's top wheat yield belongs to Chuck Downey of St. Francis, Western Region winner, with a yield of 88.56 bushels per acre. Other regional winners are Butch Harris of Soldier and Levi Felbush of Abilene, Eastern Region winners; and Doug Keas of Plainville, Central Region winner. The top quality award, announced on September 11 by Governor Sam Brownback, was also awarded to Doug Keas.   

- 9/5/2014
Kansas Wheat will be hosting a booth in the Pride of Kansas building at the Kansas State Fair, September 5th through the 14th in Hutchinson.  And the theme of the exhibit this year honors the man known as “The Father of the Green Revolution”.  Marsha Boswell has more in this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

With 2014’s wheat harvest well in the bin now, producers are starting to make decisions that can affect next year's crop, for both themselves and their neighbors.   That includes controlling volunteer wheat , as Marsha Boswell reports on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Recently, Kansas Wheat welcomed five milling industry customers from The Phillipines, one of the largest outlets in the world for U.S. wheat exports, to Kansas…to see and learn about winter wheat production first hand.  Marsha Boswell recaps their visit, and what was gained from it, on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.  

- 8/15/2014
Earlier this month, 26 of the nation’s most influential food and nutrition professionals visited North Dakota, as part of the second Wheat Safari, hosted by the Wheat Foods Council.  Marsha Boswell reports.

Kansas Wheat annually sponsors the Kansas Wheat Yield Contest, recognizing growers from eastern, central and western Kansas.  And despite a sub-par year for wheat production in this state, this year’s winners were able to achieve some impressive yields, as reported by Marsha Boswell in this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

- 8/1/2014
Kansas State University released its first variety, Kanred, 100 years ago. Now, a century later, K-State, in conjunction with the Kansas Wheat Alliance, is unveiling its latest variety, KanMark.  Marsha Boswell has more in this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

- 7/24/2014
Kansas Wheat’s annual meeting and the High Plains Journal’s “Wheat U” will take place on August 4 and 5 in Wichita. These are free events for any wheat producer or other interested party to attend, but they ask that one register in advance.  Marsha Boswell has more.
 

- 7/18/2014
Sixty years ago, a grassroots movement started by a Kansas native was implemented on an international scale.   And Kansas agriculture remains an active participant in the U.S. Food for Peace program.  This week, Marsha Boswell takes a closer look at that food aid effort.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, less than one percent of Americans are farmers that dot the rural landscape. So, many Americans don't have the opportunity to get "farm" dirty. But, the Kansas Farm Food Connection changed that for one suburban family. Marsha Boswell reports.

Nigeria remains one of the top importers of U.S. wheat. Part of the tremendous growth in the Nigerian market is due to trade team visits to learn about the U.S. grain industry. To encourage this trade partnership, the Kansas Wheat Commission recently hosted eight senior managers from Nigerian milling and pasta manufacturing companies.  Marsha Boswell reports.

The Brazilian government announced on June 24 that it was suspending the 10 percent applied tariff again this year through August 15 for up to one million metric tons of wheat from non-Mercosur sources "to ensure supply in the Brazilian market."  This action comes as a team of wheat buyers from Brazil visited Kansas to learn more about U.S. wheat.  Marsha Boswell reports.

- 6/20/2014
Wheat representatives from Kansas were in Washington, D.C., last week to share their expertise with visitors to the U.S. Botanic Gardens. “Amber Waves of Grain” is the summer terrace show this year at the U.S. Botanic Garden, celebrating the beauty and the diversity as well as the history and importance of wheat in the U.S. and across the world. The Amber Waves of Grain exhibit runs May 24 through October 13, 2014.

A group of leading flour milling executives from Brazil came to Kansas to see and learn, first-hand, about wheat production in the United States and the producers responsible for it. These millers spent time at numerous locations, including a south-central Kansas wheat farm that’s readying for harvest.  Dalton Henry has more on their recent visit.

For some, the last three years have progressed slowly. But for researchers working on groundbreaking technology, the progress made in the last three years has made time pass in the blink of an eye. Researchers from around the nation have been assembled at Kansas State University to work on the high throughput phenotyper project.

Kansas Wheat, Home Baking Association and Wheat Foods Council are teaming up to present "Flat Breads Fuel the World" baking demonstrations at the U.S. Botanic Garden, in Washington, D.C., on June 13th and 14th. The baking demonstrations will be part of Amber Waves of Grain Family Festival, an exhibit hosted by the United States Botanic Garden. The exhibit celebrates the history and beauty of wheat while honoring the work of Dr. Norman Borlaug. Marsha Boswell reports.

Kansas Wheat Day is May 30, 2014, at the K-State Agricultural Research Center in Hays. Farmers are invited to learn about upcoming research and view wheat plots during the event. Following opening remarks by WKARC Department Head Bob Gillen, Dr. Jesse Poland, from K-State's Plant Pathology Department will present a demonstration on High Throughput Phenotypes. Marsha Boswell has more on this year’s Kansas Wheat Day.
 

Former U.S. Senator Bob Dole spoke to a crowd of 150 at the Kansas Wheat Innovation Center on May 13, to share his appreciation for the people of Kansas. This stop was part of his return to Kansas for a gratitude tour with the intention of visiting all 105 counties to thank people who have supported him along his career. Marsha Boswell has more on Dole’s visit.

The National Festival of Breads, sponsored by the Kansas Wheat Commission, is just one of the great things to do, see and taste in Kansas. As part of the Kansas Sampler Festival, which drew a record crowd of nearly 12,000 people earlier this month, the Kansas Wheat staff shared the healthfulness and great taste of wheat foods and how to become a part of the world’s largest amateur baking contest which will be held in Kansas. Marsha Boswell has more.
 

The Wheat Quality Council 2014 Hard Winter Wheat Tour wrapped up on May 1st. Crop scouts estimated production for the Kansas crop at 260.6 million bushels. This would be the lowest production since 1996. The average yield, calculated from 587 stops, was 33.2 bushels per acre. Marsha Boswell has more on this year’s Hard Winter Wheat Tour.
 

The Kansas Wheat Innovation Center continues to expand as Wheat Genetics Resource Center scientists get settled into their new lab space at the center. Nicole Lane reports that a little over a year after the center was built, additional construction has allowed wheat research capabilities to grow.
 

Crop conditions around Kansas vary as the weather turns warmer and the delicate growing season for winter wheat is underway. Freeze damage and drought are a major concern for many areas of the state. The crop is battling ranging temperatures and lack of moisture. According to Guorong Zhang, wheat breeder at the K-State Agricultural Research Center at Hays, about one-third of fields do not have a very good stand, with many showing drought stress. He reported that while a few varieties have shown signs of winterkill, it is only a small percentage. Marsha Boswell has more.
 

Kansas State University’s International Grains Program is offering a pair of courses designed to provide additional training to milling professionals and other end-users of Kansas-grown products. The week-long basic and advanced milling principles courses are designed for different segments of industry professionals, but both courses focus on key milling principles. Marsha Boswell discusses the benefits these courses offer milling professionals and Kansas producers.
 

Norman Borlaug’s final words “take it to the farmer” reflected his firm belief that farmers could provide abundant food when given the proper tools. The work of Borlaug, Nobel Peace Prize winner and father of the Green Revolution, was celebrated last month at the Borlaug Summit on Wheat for Food Security in Mexico. More than 700 representatives of the wheat research industry from 67 different countries, including Kansas Wheat Commission Chairman Ron Suppes and Aaron Harries, director of marketing for Kansas Wheat, attended the conference. Marsha Boswell has more on the conference and Borlaug’s legacy.
 

With the 2014 Kansas wheat crop breaking dormancy, achieving top yields is on the minds of wheat farmers. With Mother Nature's help, your best management practices could be just the ticket to earn you a quick $1,000 in cash, if you enter the Kansas Wheat Yield Contest. Nicole Lane has more on how to participate in this year’s contest. 

As the Kansas wheat crop begins to break dormancy, concerns of winterkill are on the minds of producers. Two sub-zero events this winter with little to no snow cover may have frozen some wheat plants to death. In most areas it is still too early to determine damage but when a polar vortex strikes with little to no snow cover, especially combined with poor soil moisture, the risk of damage is high. Nicole Lane reports.
 

March is National Nutrition Month, an opportunity to spotlight healthy eating and physical activity messages at home, school and work. Many people find it difficult to consume the right amounts of food from each of the food groups. The good news is that children who participate in the school lunch program receive one-third of the USDA recommended daily allowances for lunch. Marsh Boswell has more.
 

Kansas Wheat is teaming up with the Kansas Department of Agriculture and Dillon’s Food Stores to provide 100,000 meals for Kansas families in need, through the Neighbor to Neighbor food drive. The Neighbor to Neighbor statewide food drive will help support Kansas neighbors in need and reduce hunger in Kansas communities. Marsha Boswell has more.
 
 

Giving a home-baked gift is a great way to show someone you care, but it can be even better when you could win a prize for doing so. This March, the Kansas Wheat Commission is teaming up with the Home Baking Association to promote Bake and Take Month. For more than 40 years, Bake and Take Month has been an opportunity to celebrate relationships with friends and family by baking and sharing treats. Nicole Lane has more.
 
 

Kansas State University researchers met recently with representatives from the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers, Kansas Wheat Alliance, and Kansas Crop Improvement Association. The researchers each gave a 10-minute presentation, followed by questions. Kansas wheat producers, through the two-cent per bushel wheat assessment, fund approximately $1 million in research each year. Marsha Boswell has more on the research being funded.
 
 

U.S. wheat is the world’s most reliable choice. That’s the message U.S. Wheat Associates takes to foreign markets through its 17 offices all over the world. Shannon Schlecht, vice president of policy, spoke to Kansas Wheat Boards and at the recent Kansas Commodity Classic. He told growers that Kansas is very important to our overseas buyers. Marsha Boswell has more.
 
 

After nearly three years of limbo in Congress, a five-year farm bill has been passed. Farmers across the nation now face the burden of learning how the changes will affect their home operations. The legislation is expected to reduce spending by $23 billion over the next decade, with a portion coming from the end of direct payments. This cut allowed lawmakers to expand the federally subsidized crop insurance programs to help farmers better manage risk tied to unexpected weather disasters or fluctuations in commodity prices. Marsha Boswell reports.
 
 

Kansas farmers are invited to the Kansas Commodity Classic in Manhattan on February 13th to gain in-depth information on grain markets, a 2014 weather outlook, and projects in some of the state's key commodities. The Commodity Classic is the annual convention of the Kansas Corn, Wheat and Grain Sorghum Associations, and will take place at the Four Points Inn. Marsha Boswell has more.

 

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