K-State Research and Extension News
K-State agricultural specialists and other experts examine agricultural issues facing Kansas and the nation. AGRICULTURE TODAY is a daily program hosted by Eric Atkinson and distributed to radio stations throughout the state. Below are the segments for shows over the last several weeks. See our Affiliates for airtimes. Send comments to ksrenews@ksu.edu.
 
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Agriculture Today
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- 3/27/2015
Eric Atkinson looks at the day's ag news.

- 3/27/2015
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp covers the Kansas agricultural weather scene.

K-State grain market economist Dan O'Brien breaks down the pre-report estimates for next week's USDA planting intentions report, and updates his projections on net returns to row crop production in Kansas this year, as talking points during his weekly grain market commentary.

The state director of the Farm Service Agency, Adrian Polansky, offers some last-minute input for crop producers ahead of the deadline for making the choice on the farm program "safety net" options, which is next Tuesday....also, K-State risk management specialist Art Barnaby reports on a change in one of the ARC/PLC decision-making tools worth knowing about.

K-State horticultural entomologist Raymond Cloyd talks about the three cornerstones of controlling lawn and garden insects in early-to-mid spring:  timing, coverage and frequency.

- 3/26/2015
Eric Atkinson looks at the day's ag news.

K-State crop production specialist Doug Shoup talks about pre-emergence herbicide treatments on soybean ground ahead of planting, and the best options for various weed challenges in soybeans, considering the glyphosate resistance factor that has turned up in many locations around Kansas.

The associate director of the IGP Institute at K-State, Mark Fowler, reports on the institute's latest activities in promoting Kansas grain sales abroad via purchaser education:  he talks about the increasing success in reaching grain importing interests abroad via distance education.

K-State crop production specialist Stu Duncan passes along observations on the state of the Kansas wheat crop that were exchanged during a statewide Extension agent conference call last week...indications are that winter damage and outright winterkill are prevalent in numerous fields, and Stu talks about what individual growers should now be inspecting for.

Iowa State University agricultural law specialist Roger McEowen covers several recent agriculture-related court decisions, one of which is the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling earlier this month in the long-running dispute between Kansas and Nebraska over water availability from the Republican River basin.

- 3/25/2015
K-State's Gus van der Hoeven presents "Stop, Look and Listen," his weekly commentary on rural Kansas,

- 3/25/2015
Eric Atkinson looks at the day's ag news.

K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee talks about snow geese and the overpopulation problem that waterfowl is facing, which has prompted more relaxed snow goose hunting regulations in Kansas and elsewhere.

K-State crop entomologist Brian McCornack talks about a new three-year project that he and colleagues at K-State are launching this year:  the use of unmanned aerial systems in identifying insect activity in wheat fields...this work is funded by a substantial grant from a research center in Australia, and will find out just how much these systems can advance the ability to scout fields for insect pests, leading to more efficient control.

K-State wheat disease specialist Erick DeWolf has the latest on disease potential in Kansas wheat as the crop develops in the coming weeks...he notes the reports of rust disease building up in states to the south, and if that threat could start turning up in Kansas as well.

- 3/24/2015
Eric Atkinson looks at the day's ag news.

K-State veterinarian Gregg Hanzlicek discusses an often-overlooked pathogen that can cause abortions in gestating beef cows and heifers, called neospora: he talks about the nature of this affliction, and the options that cow-calf producers have in contending with it.

K-State 4-H specialist Deryl Waldren talks about the multiple opportunities for Kansas 4-H families to host exchange youth from other countries this summer.

- 3/23/2015
Eric Atkinson looks at the day's ag news.

Livestock economist Lee Schulz of Iowa State University provides insight on the cattle markets this week:  he comments on the numbers from the USDA's monthly cattle-on-feed report released last Friday, and talks about the potential impact of the avian influenza situation in the poultry sector on domestic poultry supplies, and the ensuing effect on beef demand.

- 3/20/2015
K-State crop production specialist Ignacio Ciampitti discusses corn seeding rates, and the factors that he considers the most important as a grower settles on plant population targets and the seeding rates that will get them there...there's a helpful guide on that now available in the latest K-State Agronomy E-update Newsletter.

- 3/20/2015
Eric Atkinson looks at the day's ag news.

K-State grain market economist Dan O'Brien goes over one highly-respected firm's survey of farmer spring-planting intentions released this week, in advance of the USDA's prospective plantings report coming out later this month...and he talks about his own just-released projection on expected net returns to summer crops in Kansas this year, which producers can use as a reference for their own planting decisions this spring.

- 3/20/2015
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp reports on Kansas agricultural weather.

K-State horticulturist Ward Upham talks cool-season lawn management in early spring:  proper early mowing, timing of fertilizer applications and watering schedule.

K-State crop entomologist Jeff Whitworth provides early-spring advice to alfalfa growers about controlling alfalfa weevil, which are becoming active in Kansas stands...he encourages producers to not be "trigger-happy" with weevil treatments, but rather wait until infestations reach the recommended treatment threshold.

K-State soil scientist Augustine Obour reports his new research findings on the impact of glyphosate-tolerant crop production on soil properties over multiple growing seasons...he has discovered that the nutrient content of such soils can change favorably for the producer under long-term production of glyphosate-resistant corn and soybeans.

- 3/19/2015
Eric Atkinson looks at the day's ag news.

K-State soil nutrient specialist Dorivar Ruiz-Diaz looks at the merits of applying soil amendment products to row crop fields ahead of planting, and what producers can reasonably expect from those treatments...he urges growers to thoroughly study the performance of these products before investing.

K-State meats specialist Travis O'Quinn comments on the proposed new USDA dietary guidelines, and why lean meats are getting shortchanged in that proposal, with the deadline for public comment on this now extended into May.

- 3/18/2015
K-State's Gus van der Hoeven presents "Stop, Look and Listen", his weekly commentary on rural Kansas.

K-State weed management specialist Dallas Peterson discusses spring control of weeds in winter wheat, going over the various herbicide options for dealing with grassy and broadleaf weeds at the proper stage of wheat development.

K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee talks this week about a new study of solar energy collectors installed in the open areas around airports, and whether that has any impact on the bird-airplane collision problem.

K-State rangeland agronomist Clenton Owensby discusses the timing of prescribed burning, and the ensuing influence on stocker cattle gains, saying that the late-spring time frame remains the optimal burning window.  He also introduces a new continuous grazing concept that has proven its worth over multiple years of K-State field research, including season-long stocking, intensive early stocking and intensive early stocking combined with late season grazing on the same pasture for improved economic returns while not setting back the grass.

- 3/17/2015
Eric Atkinson looks at the day's ag news.

K-State rangeland agronomist Clenton Owensby discusses the timing of prescribed burning, and the ensuing influence on stocker cattle gains, saying that the late-spring time frame remains the optimal burning window.  He also introduces a new continuous grazing concept that has proven its worth over multiple years of K-State field research, including season-long stocking, intensive early stocking and intensive early stocking combined with late season grazing on the same pasture for improved economic returns while not setting back the grass.

Fire information officer with the Kansas Forest Service at K-State, Shawna Hartman, looks ahead to a major wildfire mitigation event to take place in Reno County next week, which will serve in part to train firefighter students and other personnel in wildland fire response.

The director of the Livestock Marketing Information Center, Jim Robb, provides this week's insight on the cattle markets:  he goes over new beef export numbers from the USDA, and comments on the avian influenza situation confronting the poultry industry, and the likely spillover impact on the cattle markets.

A guest speaker at K-State's recent 2015 Cattlemen's Day, University of Florida-Marianna beef reproduction specialist Cliff Lamb, talks about heat synchronization protocols for the beef cow herd, and why he favors the fixed-time A-I approach.

K-State 4-H specialist Pam van Horn is joined by Central Kansas Extension District horse project leader Bev Seuser, who has just been named the  Kansas 4-H Rodney Barrows Equine Project Volunteer of the Year.

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