K-State Research and Extension News
K-State agricultural specialists and other experts examine agricultural issues facing Kansas and the nation. AGRICULTURE TODAY is a daily program hosted by Eric Atkinson and distributed to radio stations throughout the state. Below are the segments for shows over the last 4 weeks. See our Affiliates for airtimes. Send comments to agtoday@ksu.edu.
Agriculture Today
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State weed specialist Scott Marsh of the Kansas Department of Agriculture provides an update on the continuing efforts to reign in two of the leading noxious weed problems in Kansas, serecia lespedeza and musk thistle...he also talks about the state's Weed-Free Forage Program, and how growers can take advantage of that forage certification service.
 

For this week's horticulture segment, K-State horticulturist Dennis Patton takes on a variety of mid-spring lawn and landscape management topics.
 

- 4/24/2014
K-State Radio Network agriculture director Eric Atkinson reports on the day's top stories.

K-State entomologist J.P. Michaud reports on a likely new insect threat to grain sorghum crops in Kansas:  the sugarcane aphid, which ravaged numerous sorghum fields in Texas last year, and is expected to migrate to Kansas this year....he talks about identifying this pest, and the complications in controlling it.
 

K-State's Gus van der Hoeven presents Stop, Look and Listen...his weekly commentary on rural Kansas.

K-State entomologist Jim Nechols looks at a discovery in the area of biological control of weeds that will be important to that weed management approach in the future:  the changes in weed plants resulting from one insect's feeding that may render another biologically-beneficial insect ineffective as a weed control weapon.
 

- 4/23/2014
K-State graduate and long-time University of Illinois meat scientist Tom Carr reflects on his highly-successful career, as he was just honored as this year's Alumni Fellow by the K-State College of Agriculture.
 

K-State precision agricultural engineer Ajay Sharda talks about advancements in field sprayer technology that he'll be researching at the university, and passes along some recommendations to producers and commercial applicators about readying their spray rigs for this year's field work, giving special attention to the rate control systems on those units.
 

K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee discusses the traits of the eastern chipmunk, which can be found in certain parts of Kansas.

From the 100th Beef Research Roundup at K-State's Agricultural Research Center at Hays last Thursday: K-State rangeland scientist Keith Harmoney provides an update on the multi-year research he has conducted at the center on modified intensive early stocking of calves on short-grass prairie, and the flexibility that grazing program offers to the western Kansas cattle producer.

- 4/22/2014
K-State Radio Network agriculture director Eric Atkinson reports on the day's top stories. Plus, K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk has this week's Milk Lines.
 

From the 100th Beef Research Roundup at K-State's Agricultural Research Center at Hays last Thursday: Bob Gillen, who heads the Center, reflects on some of the many beef research breakthroughs accomplished at the center over the last century. Also, K-State beef systems specialist Justin Waggoner talks about his latest work at the center with ammoniated wheat straw, evaluating the feeding value of that roughage when the anhydrous application rate to the straw is reduced as a cost-savings measure.
 

For this week's Kansas 4-H segment, former 4-H student intern Ruddy Yanez talks about a special 4-H initiative in southwest Kansas, which has succeeded in drawing youth of Hispanic and Asian descent into 4-H youth development activities.
 

For this week's Kansas 4-H segment, former 4-H student intern Ruddy Yanez talks about a special 4-H initiative in southwest Kansas, which has succeeded in drawing youth of Hispanic and Asian descent into 4-H youth development activities.
 

K-State beef cattle nutritionist Dale Blasi talks about the findings of his new study, which evaluated the use of distillers' dried grains as a free-choice supplement for stocker heifers on native pasture...this could prove to be an economically-beneficial approach, especially as pastures remain stressed by dry weather.
 

The director of the Livestock Marketing Information Center, Jim Robb, provides this week's cattle market analysis:  he offers the LMIC's pre-report estimates of the USDA's cattle-on-feed report coming out this Friday, and shares the center's new extended outlook on cattle production and prices into and through 2015.
 

- 4/21/2014
K-State Radio Network agriculture director Eric Atkinson reports on the day's top stories. Plus, this week's Tree Tales with Bob Atchison of the Kansas Forest Service at Kansas State University.

K-State grain market economist Dan O'Brien provides his weekly comments on the grain markets:  he'll focus on the wheat market's reaction to the escalating concerns over wheat crop conditions in the central and southern plains, and he'll offer a fresh look at the old-crop and new-crop futures price spreads, and the producer pricing opportunities within.
 

K-State climatologist Mary Knapp reports on Kansas agricultural weather.

- 4/18/2014
K-State Radio Network agriculture director Eric Atkinson reports on the day's top stories. Plus, this week's Wheat Scoop from Kansas Wheat.

K-State agricultural engineer Ed Brokesh talks about the performance of ethanol in small engines commonly used on farms and ranches...he points out that ethanol often gets a bad rap as a small engine fuel, and he talks about the engine operation characteristics associated with ethanol, and minor adjustments that one can make that will lead to optimum performance.
 

The second part of our conversation with K-State soil scientist Chuck Rice, who was the lead author of the agriculture chapter of a new report on global climate change and recommendations on mitigating that change.

An extended conversation with K-State soil scientist Chuck Rice, who was the lead author of the agriculture chapter of a new report on global climate change, and recommendations on mitigating that change...that report was formally unveiled at a World Bank meeting in Washington, D.C. yesterday...among the areas covered in this report: the opportunities to sequester more carbon dioxide in the soil through improved crop production practices; a call to ramp up up bioenergy production from crop and forest land;  and a likely contentious proposal to move human diets more toward plant-based foodstuffs as a way of addressing methane emissions from food animal production.
 

- 4/17/2014
K-State Radio Network radio producer Jeff Wichman reports on the day's top stories, including an the Sheep and Goat Conference being hosted by K-State May 2-4 in Weber Hall on the Manhattan campus.

For this week's horticulture segment, K-State horticulturist Ward Upham discusses this week's hard freeze and the likely impact on fruit trees.
 

- 4/16/2014
K-State Radio Network agriculture director Eric Atkinson reports on the day's top stories.

K-State agronomist Jim Shroyer discusses the likely hard freeze damage to winter wheat in several areas of Kansas earlier this week, and how growers can tell the extent of that damage as they inspect their stands in the days ahead.
 

Agricultural law specialist Roger McEowen of Iowa State University shares more recent developments in the agricultural law arena, including a tax court ruling on a horse breeder's business losses, and on a test of one state's "buy-the-farm" statute associated with utility companies seeking easements on agricultural property.
 

K-State's Gus van der Hoeven presents Stop, Look and Listen...his weekly commentary on rural Kansas.

K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee discusses newly-planted crop damage that can result from kangaroo rat colonies, and what producers can do to curb that problem.
 

K-State weed management specialist Curt Thompson recommends that grain sorghum growers start now with their winter annual weed burn-down treatments, before those weeds go to seed and become more difficult to control...he goes over the K-State-recommended herbicide options for this purpose, as well as for pre-plant and post-emergence applications.
 

The state director of the Farm Service Agency, Adrian Polansky, announces the opening of sign-up for several USDA livestock disaster assistance programs, beginning today:  he expects a large number of Kansas livestock operators to qualify for one of those, the Livestock Forage Disaster Assistance program, which will cover grazing losses as a result of drought in 2012 and 2013.
 

- 4/14/2014
K-State Radio Network agriculture director Eric Atkinson reports on the day's top stories. Plus, this week's Tree Tale with Extension forester Charles Barden.

Livestock economist Derrell Peel of Oklahoma State University provides this week's insight on the cattle markets:  he says that all phases of the cattle trade appear to be peaking out now, and he'll comment on how much downside there might be for prices ahead...he also talks about the continuing effect of P-E-D virus in hog production on retail pork prices, which in turn influences beef demand.
 

For this week's Kansas 4-H feature, K-State 4-H youth gardening and plant science specialist Evelyn Neier encourages 4-Hers to think about raising garden produce for sharing later on with local food banks and other services for the needy.
 

K-State entomologist Ludek Zurek reports on his new study of insects' role in carrying antibiotic-resistant bacteria from one point to the other, including from livestock production facilities to the urban environment...his work confirming that insects are, in fact, vectoring that bacteria, but not only from food animal production.
 

- 4/11/2014
K-State Radio Network agriculture director Eric Atkinson reports on the day's top stories. Plus, this week's Wheat Scoop from Kansas Wheat.

K-State grain market economist Dan O'Brien looks at this week's USDA grain supply and demand reports and the market response to the new numbers...and he talks about pricing opportunities for growers amidst what has now become a "weather market" for all the major crops.
 

K-State crops and soils specialist Doug Shoup discusses an escalating weed problem for no-till soybean growers in Kansas:  the proliferation of marestail...he advises producers to treat that weed early, and goes over the herbicide options for keeping marestail in check.
 

K-State climatologist Mary Knapp reports on Kansas agricultural weather...which includes a good chance of rain for parts of the state this weekend.
 
 

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