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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   08/29/2014...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
KANSAS AGRICULTURE ADVOCACY


Track1  (3:01)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
CATTLE MARKET REPORT


Track2  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WEANED CALF DIETS


Track3  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
KANSAS AGRICULTURE ADVOCACY
The Department of Agricultural Economics at Kansas State University recently hosted its annual Risk and Profit Conference. One session at this conference is called “A Conversation With A Kansas Producer,” which allows attendees to interact with a Kansas farmer or rancher. This year’s guest was a hog and crops producer from southeast Kansas, Michael Springer. Springer has a passion for advocating agriculture by engaging himself in different activities.

Track4  (:41)  Q…with a face.
Springer says it the most important message to communicate to consumers is how the animal product is being cared for and produced.

Track5  (:34)  Q...are better off.
Springer sees social media and blog posts as an asset in telling production agriculture’s story.

Track6  (:49)  Q...we have it.

Tag:That was Kansas agricultural producer Michael Springer, a featured speaker at K-State’s Risk and Profit Conference recently held in Manhattan.
CATTLE MARKET REPORT
The USDA recently released its monthly cattle-on-feed report, which is regarded as a reliable indicator of cattle feedlot inventories across the U.S. The Kansas feedlot numbers within that report suggest that a noteworthy trend is in place, according to a K-State livestock economist. Compared to the national figures, the decline in feedlot cattle in Kansas is greater than that of other states, as K-State’s Glynn Tonsor points out.

Track7  (:37)  Q…total U.S. number.
And this trend is evident across virtually the entire High Plains feedlot region... fewer cattle in feedlots, while feedlot placements in Corn Belt states like Nebraska and Iowa are declining at a much slower rate.

Track8  (:42)  Q...are being placed.
Tonsor believes that the current economics of feedlot cattle production will simply fuel this geographic shift of the feedlot industry even more.

Track9  (:34)  Q…in this industry.

Tag:That’s K-State agricultural economist Glynn Tonsor, commenting on the latest Kansas numbers in the USDA’s August cattle-on-feed report.
WEANED CALF DIETS
No matter whether a beef calf is weaned early, at less than 180 days of age, or conventionally, managing that calf’s feed intake is a critical step to its future growth. K-State researchers have devised a system that allows the calf to transition to dry feed more smoothly. As beef systems specialist Justin Waggoner points out here, that calf’s intake right after being removed from the cow is typically at a very low level.

Track10  (:25)  Q…days following weaning.
That’s why Waggoner recommends establishing feed consumption targets to shoot for.

Track11  (:21)  Q...dry feed per day.
And how to get there is by “stair-stepping” the calf’s conversion to dry feed during the first week after separation, using a protocol developed at K-State’s Agricultural Research Center at Hays.

Track12  (1:07)  Q...to have them consuming.

Tag:On a proven approach to successfully switching the weaned calf diet over toward a concentrated feedstuff, that’s K-State beef systems specialist Justin Waggoner.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
FINANCIAL RECOVERY AFTER A DISASTER
Disaster is commonly defined as a sudden event, such as an accident or a natural catastrophe that causes great damage or loss of life. While we can’t always control what happens, we can be better prepared to deal with a disaster. For the nearly three million people who live in Kansas, a disaster could include a tornado, flood, ice storm or fire. Prepare Kansas, an online financial challenge to organize and help ease recovery after disasters, is being offered throughout September. K-State Research and Extension family resource specialist Elizabeth Kiss (kish) says the online program focuses on a few activities each week, including reviewing insurance coverage, making a grab-and-go box and developing a household inventory – which can be as easy as videotaping the contents of each room.

Track13  (:44)  Q...is on those items.

Tag:This is also a good time to review all of your insurance coverage – home, auto and health – to make sure you have adequate coverage, a deductible that isn’t too high or too low and that you fully understand what is and isn’t covered.
PUTTING TOGETHER A GRAB-AND-GO BOX
As part of Prepare Kansas, Kiss (kish) says they’ll also help families put together a grab-and-go box.

Track14  (:44)  Q...grab-and-go box is.

Tag:Kiss (kish) says some of the information can be stored digitally in the “cloud” or put on a flash drive that’s kept in a fireproof safe or safety deposit box with other personal information, including birth certificates, social security cards and family photos.
PREPARE KANSAS IS AN ONLINE PROGRAM
September has been designated National Preparedness Month by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Kiss (kish) says that made September a “no-brainer” for the month to offer the program and that making it an online program also made a lot of sense.

Track15  (:20)  Q...makes sense for them.
YOU MUST REGISTER FOR PREPARE KANSAS
While participation in Prepare Kansas is free, Kiss (kish) says the registration deadline is September 6th.

Track16  (:37)  Q...slash Prepare Kansas.
PREPARE KANSAS HAS BEEN PILOT TESTED
Although this is the first time Prepare Kansas has been offered, Kiss (kish) says they’ve been pilot testing the program for quite a while.

Track17  (:36)  Q...go back and fill in.

Tag:More information on Prepare Kansas is available at county and district Extension offices and online at blogs.k-state.edu/preparekansas.
LAWN AND GARDEN
FALL LAWN SEEDING
We’re not quite there yet, but drawing ever closer to fall lawn seeding time. This, of course, is for cool-season lawns like brome and fescue. And there are a handful of basic steps to succeeding with a new lawn planting, or overseeding an existing lawn. The K-State horticulture agent based in Johnson County, Dennis Patton, says is all starts with proper seedbed preparation.

Track18  (1:06)  Q...so it can germinate.
LAWN CORE AERATION
Another option for readying a thin lawn for overseeding is aeration. As with the verti-cutter, core aerators can be rented from local outlets. Patton says that quite a bit can be accomplished by aerating.

Track19  (:45)  Q...you’re good to go.
LAWN STARTER FERTILIZER
An essential for succeeding with fall lawn planting is spreading a starter fertilizer over the newly-seeded area. Patton points out that nitrogen is not the only nutrient necessary for a good start.

Track20  (:42)  Q...with the math.
WATERING NEW LAWNS
What is as imperative as anything else in getting a newly-seeded lawn up and going is providing adequate water to the seedlings. A dry seedbed is bad news for grass seed, says Patton.

Track21  (:55)  Q...maybe morning and evening.
PERSISTENT FALL WATERING
Not only does one want to make sure and thoroughly water a new lawn at planting time, but keep that regular watering up right through the fall. Patton says that will help assure that the new grass will sufficiently overwinter.

Track22  (:23)  Q...the winter as well.
KANSAS PROFILE
HIGH PLAINS JOURNAL
What was once a local newspaper with only five employees and a little over one hundred subscribers, has grown into one of the nation’s premiere publications, with a unique focus on regional agriculture. Ron Wilson, director of the Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development at Kansas State University, has the story of the “High Plains Journal.”

Track23  (4:21)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
PACKING CORN SILAGE
With corn silage harvest time here, this reminder comes from K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (Brook): precision is a necessity when packing silage in a bunker or pile. It starts with harvesting at the proper moisture content. From there, the goal is assuring that the silage is packed tight. Brouk talks this week about achieving that goal.

Track24  (2:00)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
PLASTIC IN BIRD NESTS
Discarded plastic materials such as fishing line have long been a welfare concern for aquatic life. Such plastics are often taken by birds for nesting material, which can lead to nestling problems. Recently, a study in California sought to measure that impact in crows’ nests. K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee talks of their findings this week.

Track25  (5:00)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
FINANCIAL RECOVERY AFTER A DISASTER
Disaster is commonly defined as a sudden event, such as an accident or a natural catastrophe that causes great damage or loss of life. While we can’t always control what happens, we can be better prepared to deal with a disaster. For the nearly three million people who live in Kansas, a disaster could include a tornado, flood, ice storm or fire. K-State Research and Extension family resource specialist Elizabeth Kiss (kish) says Prepare Kansas, an online financial challenge to organize and help ease recovery after disasters, is being offered throughout September to help families build a household inventory, review insurance coverage, make a grab-and-go box and provide tips for what to do following a disaster.

Track26  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
FOREST CONTRACTOR AGREEMENTS
Landowners who are serious about managing their woodland resources will often hire the services of a certified forest contractor. K-State forester Bob Atchison endorses that idea. And he urges landowners to fully formalize that agreement with the contractor. Here, he covers some of the finer details of that.

Track27  (2:01)  Q…theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)


Track28  (1:57)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
VOLUNTEER WHEAT CONTROL
With 2014’s wheat harvest well in the bin now, producers are starting to make decisions that can affect next year's crop, for both themselves and their neighbors. That includes controlling volunteer wheat, as Marsha Boswell reports on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (2:58)  Q…for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
FLORIDA KEYS HURRICANE ANNIVERSARY
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp looks back at one of the worst hurricanes ever to hit the U.S.

Track30  (:51)  Q…Research and Extension.
THE LARGEST HAILSTONE IN KANSAS
What was the largest hailstone ever recorded hitting Kansas? K-State climatologist Mary Knapp tells us.

Track31  (:58)  Q…Research and Extension.
INSECT WEATHER PREDICTORS
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp examines whether or not insect behavior forecasts weather events.

Track32  (1:00)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
DEALING WITH SEXUAL ASSAULT
It’s reported that in their lifetime, as many as 25-percent of women will say they have been sexually assaulted. But one expert on the subject feels those numbers are wrong…very wrong. He says no one addresses one of the most serious elements of sexual assault — a failure to obtain consent. And, the average person does not relate to the importance of needing to have permission before engaging in an intimate act with another person. Guest: Mike Domitraz is a prolific writer-producer of materials addressing healthy dating, consent, sexual decision-making, bystander intervention, sexual assault awareness, and supporting sexual assault survivors. He is the author of two books… "May I Kiss You" and "Voices of Courage."

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.