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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   03/30/2015...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
BEEF COW NEOSPORA


Track1  (3:02)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
KANSAS WHEAT CONDITION


Track2  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT DRONE RESEARCH


Track3  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
BEEF COW NEOSPORA
In bovine health management, an organism called neospora (NEO-oh-spora) can be a serious affliction, causing abortions in beef cow herds. K-State veterinarian Gregg Hanzlicek (HANS-el-check) says this organism has made an appearance during this year’s calving season in Kansas. If a bred female contracts neospora, there would be a high risk for an abortion to occur. Hanzlicek explains how this organism is expressed into two different patterns throughout the gestation period.

Track4  (:36)  Q…organ shutdown.
Transmission is possible to other female bovine, potentially leading to offspring with this organism as well.

Track5  (:36)  Q...abort their fetus.
Hanzlicek reminds producers to take caution in reducing the risk of spreading this organism, for there is no current treatment or vaccination.

Track6  (:44)  Q...organism is spread.

Tag:That was K-State veterinarian Gregg Hanzlicek, talking about a potentially devastating organism to cow-calf operations, neospora. Producers who have concerns about this condition should discuss it with their local veterinarian.
KANSAS WHEAT CONDITION
K-State crop production specialist Stu Duncan has been working with colleagues in evaluating the condition of winter wheat across the state of Kansas. In doing so, they are discovering winterkill in some stands. In explaining the cause of that winterkill, Duncan says wheat may not have been prepared enough for winter temperatures, leaving stands at risk for potential damage.

Track7  (:49)  Q…several days there.
In analyzing wheat conditions during this spring season, both the planting date and the depth of seeding seem to have made a difference.

Track8  (:39)  Q...root system developed.
Duncan describes physical effects producers should be looking for when inspecting their wheat stands for winter damage.

Track9  (:26)  Q…much an indicator.

Tag:That was K-State’s Stu Duncan, commenting on possible cold weather damage to winter wheat in Kansas. For more information please visit, www.ksre.ksu.edu.
WHEAT DRONE RESEARCH
Kansas State University has become a national leader in unmanned aerial systems research, and its potential application to crop management. K-State is launching a new project this year, testing this technology for its value in scouting wheat fields for insect pests. K-State crop entomologist Brian McCornack is spearheading this three-year study, in partnership with a major research center in Australia. He explains the objective of this work.

Track10  (:33)  Q…to really high.
The project will attempt to discover the practical use of U-A-S in crop field scouting, according to McCornack.

Track11  (:43)  Q...make a further decision.
Fully understanding the scouting capabilities of the technology will set the table for its future use by producers and crop consultants.

Track12  (:36)  Q...requires more action.

Tag:K-State crop entomologist Brian McCornack, remarking on his new project, evaluating the ability of unmanned aerial systems to effectively pinpoint insect infestations in wheat fields.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
OUR LANGUAGE AFFECTS CHILDREN
A majority of a child’s communication begins with their parents. Unfortunately, that communication is not always positive. We too often encounter parents ridiculing, shaming or name-calling their child in a public place. While this is upsetting to witness, the damage caused by this type of behavior – which is also most likely occurring at home – can be devastating to a child. As a result, parents should be mindful about how they communicate with children. K-State child development specialist Bradford Wiles says some parents are just not fully aware of the consequences their language has on their children.

Track13  (:28)  Q…becomes the inside.
USE “NO” AS A WORD FOR SAFETY
Studies show children hear the word “no” as many as 400 times a day. Wiles says “no” is an overused word that often loses its meaning with children. Instead, he suggests finding ways to redirect a child’s attention away from one activity toward another and reserving the word “no” for times when a child is about to do something that could cause them harm or injury.

Track14  (:52)  Q...really, really effective.
PUT YOURSELF IN ADULT TIMEOUT
When a child throws a temper tantrum or has a meltdown, Wiles says that’s the time parents need to step back, take a deep breath and help the child calm down – not lose control, yell at the child and cause the situation to get out of hand.

Track15  (:45)  Q...the most effective.
NEVER RIDICULE OR SHAME A CHILD
No matter how out-of-control a situation becomes, Wiles says parents should never succumb to ridiculing, name-calling or shaming their child.

Track16  (:32)  Q...in fact, devastating.
NOT HAVING AN IMMEDIATE REACTION
When parents are being triggered by their child’s behavior, it typically occurs at an inopportune moment, in an inopportune place and when they are most stressed. Wiles says that’s when parents should be mindful about how they respond – which means not having an immediate reaction to whatever the child is doing.

Track17  (:54)  Q...love the child.

Tag:More information on parenting skills and communicating with children is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
OVERWINTERING LANDSCAPE INSECTS
You homeowners may already have an idea of the springtime insect activity to expect in your landscape. A number of those pests that have overwintered can, and should, be dealt with right away, before they get out of hand. K-State horticultural entomologist Raymond Cloyd cites a few examples.

Track18  (1:11)  Q...for the coming season, then.
DORMANT OIL USAGE
For overwintering insects in the lawn and garden, the use of a dormant oil insecticide product can perform quite well in controlling those pests. However, Cloyd points out that the time window for employing those products is rapidly closing.

Track19  (:40)  Q...insect and mite pests.
CORNERSTONES OF CONTROL
There are three basic elements to successful lawn and garden insect control using insecticide products, according to Cloyd. He refers to them as “T-C-F”…and explains here what that acronym refers to.

Track20  (:51)  Q...target insect and mite pests.
PROMOTING HEALTHY PLANTS
If a landscape plant is less than healthy, it’s simply more vulnerable to insect damage. So, basic as it might seem, the first line of defense against horticultural insects is promoting plant health through proper management, as Cloyd notes here.

Track21  (:43)  Q...it's not going to make it.
WATERING AND INSECTS
Most homeowners don’t directly relate landscape water availability to insect pressure on their ornamental plants. But rest assured, the two are linked together, says Cloyd. A well-watered plant is far more capable of fending off insect trouble than is a water-stressed plant.

Track22  (1:11)  Q...the root system of your plants.
KANSAS PROFILE
DAN MEERS – K-C WOLF
Ron Wilson of K-State’s Huck Boyd Institute introduces us to a sports mascot that provides inspiration to people around the world.

Track23  (4:20)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
CONTENDING WITH CALF SCOURS
It’s a common occurrence on dairy farms…scours disease in newborn calves. The variable spring weather has a lot to do with that, according to K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook), as does sanitation in calf management. This week, Mike talks about steps to follow in keeping incidences of calf scours to a minimum.

Track24  (2:00)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
SNOW GOOSE DILEMMA
Light geese, also called snow geese, commonly migrate into and through Kansas each year. This species is facing a major issue…its rapid population expansion has overwhelmed its Arctic nesting grounds. In response, federal wildlife officials have liberalized the snow goose hunting regulations. This week, K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee looks at the over-population problem, and the attempts to address it.

Track25  (5:00)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
OUR LANGUAGE AFFECTS CHILDREN
A majority of a child’s communication begins with their parents. Unfortunately, that communication is not always positive. We too often encounter parents ridiculing, shaming or name-calling their child in a public place. While this is upsetting to witness, the damage caused by this type of behavior – which is also most likely occurring at home – can be devastating to a child. As a result, K-State child development specialist Bradford Wiles parents should be mindful of how they communicate with their children.

Track26  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
TREES AND CLIMATE CHANGE
A recently-published article sheds light on what foresters like K-State’s Bob Atchison already know…that trees are very effective at sequestering carbon from the atmosphere. And trees will play a major role in contenting with climate change in future years. This week, Bob discusses this in more detail, inviting landowners to do their part by planting conservation trees on their premises.

Track27  (2:01)  Q…(theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)


Track28  (2:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
CURRYING THE COLOMBIAN MARKET
A Kansas wheat farmer recently spent some time in South America, promoting wheat sales to a country that often goes overlooked as an important U.S. wheat customer. Marsha Boswell has more on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (3:00)  Q...I'm Marsha Boswell.
WEATHER WONDERS
NORMAL WEATHER
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp explains how the meaning of “normal” varies in the weather world.

Track30  (:58)  Q…Research and Extension.
APRIL FOOL WEATHER
Severe weather can play nasty tricks on April 1st, according to K-State climatologist Mary Knapp.

Track31  (:57)  Q…Research and Extension.
APRIL SHOWERS
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp said April rains are important to the emergence of spring plants.

Track32  (1:06)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
SCIENCE DENIAL AND THE U.S. FOOD SYSTEM
By the year 2050, there could be over nine-and-one-half billion people on the planet. That increase in the number of mouths to feed means that farmers, worldwide, may have to produce as much as 100 percent more food than they do right now. And that may be a problem unless some of the mistrust in agriculture is dealt with. The guest is Charlie Arnot, C-E-O of the Center for Food Integrity

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.