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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   12/22/2014...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
SUCCESSION PLANNING CONFERENCES


Track1  (3:02)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
SOYBEAN PERFORMANCE TEST


Track2  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
SOYBEAN SUDDEN DEATH


Track3  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
SUCCESSION PLANNING CONFERENCES
Handing down the operation to the next generation is an important issue that virtually all farms and ranches across Kansas face, sooner or later. This winter, K-State Research and Extension will be co-hosting a series of one-day succession planning conferences. Open to all, participants gain education and support as they prepare for the future of their enterprise. A staff member with Kansas Agricultural Mediation Services at K-State, Janel (juh-NELL) Koons, describes the importance of organized succession planning.

Track4  (:34)  Q…of the farm.
A total of five programs will be taking place across the state. Koons goes into more detail on the agenda.

Track5  (:35)  Q…and communication process.
When transitioning a family’s operation to a new generation, legal concerns may arise.

Track6  (:42)  Q...other legal issues.

Tag:That was the Kansas Agricultural Mediation Service’s Janel Koons, previewing the upcoming farm and ranch succession planning workshops located around the state. For dates and more information, contact your local Extension office or visit www.ksre.ksu.edu.
SOYBEAN PERFORMANCE TEST
After a rather drawn-out harvest, the results are now in, on K-State’s 2014 Soybean Variety Performance Test. The yield numbers and additional performance information are now available to soybean growers who are finalizing their seed selection decisions for the 2015 cropping season. K-State soybean breeder Bill Schapaugh (SHAY-paw) talks about the scope of this year’s variety field trials around the state.

Track7  (:52)  Q…don't want to forget that.
And Schapaugh is pleased that this year’s test rendered good information on differences in varietal performance.

Track8  (:37)  Q...good range in performance.
Producers can use this information to make distinctions between varieties to suit their own production needs.

Track9  (:24)  Q…to these different environments.

Tag:The full 2014 K-State Soybean Variety Performance Test report is now available from local Extension offices statewide, or can be found on line at www.agronomy.ksu.edu. That’s K-State soybean breeder Bill Schapaugh.
SOYBEAN SUDDEN DEATH
While 2014 was a relatively light year for diseases in Kansas soybean stands, one condition continues to concern producers and seed breeders alike: sudden death syndrome. As an aid to growers in addressing this problem, the just-released K-State 2014 Soybean Variety Performance Test report includes S-D-S resistance ratings for over 100 varieties. K-State soybean breeder Bill Schapaugh (SHAY-paw) says the S-D-S threat to Kansas soybeans is on the rise.

Track10  (:36)  Q…help manage this pathogen.
This is why K-State conducts a special variety evaluation for S-D-S tolerance.

Track11  (:45)  Q...is the major reason.
So Schapaugh urges growers to select varieties with S-D-S well in mind.

Track12  (:29)  Q...produced in that field.

Tag:K-State soybean breeder Bill Schapaugh. The entire K-State Soybean Variety Performance Test results for 2014 are available at your local Extension office, or at www.agronomy.ksu.edu.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
PUSHING AGAINST THE TRADITION
Holiday gatherings can bring people of all ages together for several hours or several days. As children go through different developmental and life stages, holiday gatherings can become a challenge for the entire family. Children typically want to spend time with friends and social media, while parents and other relatives often want their undivided attention. K-State Research and Extension youth development specialist Elaine Johannes (joh-HAN-ess) says the job of children is to grow up, and they do that somewhat by pushing against the tradition of what the family has laid out.

Track13  (:47)  Q...time with friends, too.
PLAN AND STRUCTURE FREE TIME
Most teenagers and young adults are willing to spend a day or two with family, but asking them to go three, four or five days without seeing their friends is going to create some problems. That’s where “free time” comes into play. However, Johannes says “free time” be defined, planned and structured.

Track14  (:59)  Q...part of the household.
TEENS MAY BROOD, SULK OR MOPE
At some point during the holidays, teenagers are probably going to brood, sulk or mope. Johannes says that’s alright…it’s a developmental skill.

Track15  (1:02)  Q...your eyes all the time.
DON’T FORGET TO HAVE SOME FUN
Spending time with family doesn’t have to be limited to just eating, talking, texting and tweeting. In fact, Johannes says teens and young adults may want to unplug by playing a board game.

Track16  (:50)  Q...old-style board games.
TREAT YOUNG ADULTS AS ADULTS
Another dynamic that’s been added to many households since the economic downturn is that more young adults are living with their parents. Johannes says it’s important other adults not judge them and that they are treated as adults.

Track17  (:43)  Q...adult is dealing with.

Tag:More information on positive youth development is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
MID-HOLIDAY POINSETTIA CARE
Many people have had poinsettias around as part of their holiday decor for a few weeks now. Their bright foliage can be preserved considerably longer, if one simply tends to the plant’s basic needs. K-State horticulturist Ward Upham (UH-puhm) says that poinsettias are much easier keepers than they used to be.

Track18  (1:06)  Q...for a long period of time.
POINSETTIA WATERING SCHEDULE
The third basic need for holiday poinsettias is, of course, adequate watering. And Upham reminds that this plant doesn’t fare well at all in overly-wet soils, as he talks about properly monitoring that.

Track19  (:38)  Q...to be watering right away.
PRESERVING AND TRANSPLANTING POINSETTIAS
Most people don’t bother, but if one wants to maintain a poinsettia until late spring and then transplant it outdoors, they can, says Upham. But it’ll take a little extra management to keep that plant going until next fall.

Track20  (:54)  Q...when you bring it back in.
HOLDING OVER GARDEN SEEDS
As evidenced by the new garden seed catalogs, vegetable garden seed prices have gone up. That has prompted several gardeners to ask Upham about the prospect of holding over excess seed from this past year for planting next year. That can certainly be done, he says, as long as one recognizes that vegetable seeds differ in their “shelf life.”

Track21  (:41)  Q...or every other year.
SEED GERMINATION TEST
Before one stores holdover garden seed for planting next year, instead of ordering new seed, one vital step must be taken, according to Upham. It’s essential to conduct a germination test on that seed. And it’s a relatively simple procedure.

Track22  (:56)  Q...need to order your seed.
KANSAS PROFILE
MIKE FRISBIE – FRISBIE CONSTRUCTION
Ron Wilson of K-State’s Huck Boyd Institute looks at a rural Kansan who uses new technology to improve old grain elevators and create new ones.

Track23  (4:24)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
MANAGING TIGHT MARGINS
Most observers believe that profit margins for dairy producers will tighten considerably in 2015. That in mind, K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook) is coaxing producers to re-assess the three main phases of their operations: milk production, feed management and herd reproduction. The idea, he says, is to seek greater efficiencies in each area, examples of which he shares this week.

Track24  (1:59)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
COYOTE MONOGAMY STUDY
Wildlife officials have long observed the behavior, but up to now there had been no bona fide scientific study of coyote monogamy. New research confirms this aspect of the coyote’s social structure. And K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee says this information lends to better approaches to coyote predation control, on which he elaborates this week.

Track25  (4:58)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
A CHILD’S HOLIDAY EXPECTATION
Holiday gatherings can bring people of all ages together for several hours or several days. As children go through different developmental and life stages, holiday gatherings can become a challenge for the entire family. Children typically want to spend time with friends and social media, while parents and other relatives often want their undivided attention. K-State Research and Extension youth development specialist Elaine Johannes (joh-HAN-ess) says the job of children is to grow up, and they do that somewhat by pushing against the tradition of what the family has laid out.

Track26  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
TREE LEAF RETENTION
Because of an unusually harsh mid-fall cold snap, many deciduous trees retained some of their leaves. And when a heavy snow or ice storm hits, that leaf load could raise the risk of tree damage. K-State forest health specialist Ryan Armbrust looks closer at why that leaf retention took place, asking homeowners and landowners to be on alert for possible problems.

Track27  (1:55)  Q…(theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)


Track28  (1:49)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
WHEAT TRADE TO CUBA
The recent announcement that the U.S. intends to normalize trade relations with Cuba is very welcome news for Kansas wheat growers and the wheat industry at large. Marsha Boswell takes a closer look on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (2:58)  Q…for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
SOLSTICE
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp (nap) explains what makes a “solstice” and how it can affect the weather.

Track30  (:51)  Q…Research and Extension.
WHITE CHRISTMAS
What makes a Christmas white depends on your perspective, according to K-State climatologist Mary Knapp.

Track31  (:58)  Q…Research and Extension.
DECEMBER TORNADOES
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp notes that a recent tornado in Kansas is not common for this time of year.

Track32  (:55)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
CYBER SECURITY RISKS
According to one cyber security expert almost 56 percent of smartphone users will use their device for some form of holiday shopping this year. That use is not a problem, but the fact that some of these phones may contain malware disguised as an app is a problem. That app could lead to data theft and identity leaks that could put the user and their private information at risk. The big issue is that many Americans are sacrificing their privacy for convenience.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.