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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   08/31/2015...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
OMEGA-3 IN BEEF
Heart health is a major concern for some consumers. What if there was a way to improve your heart health by eating beef? A K-State agriculture economist talks more about how this can be done and what it means for consumers, in this report from Agriculture Today’s Michelle Keyes.

Track1  (3:03)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
CATTLE PRICE CYCLE
The 2015 Risk and Profit Conference hosted by Kansas State featured an agricultural economist from Montana State University. He discussed the history of the cattle price cycle and where the cycle is currently. Agriculture Today’s Charlsie (CHAHRL-see) Craig visits with him.

Track2  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
COW MINERAL NUTRITION
The mineral status of the cow herd affects reproduction, growth, milk production and health. Agriculture Today’s Charlsie Craig talks with a K-State beef specialist about mineral nutrition in cows and how to maintain the right nutritional level.

Track3  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
FINAL IRRIGATION TIMING
Some crop irrigators routinely go by a specific date for concluding their crop irrigating for the season. That, says a K-State agronomist, can result in inefficient water use and, at times, unnecessary costs. Agriculture Today’s Eric Atkinson talks with him about better, research-proven ways of timing the final irrigation of the growing season.

Track4  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SOIL P-H LEVELS
Low p-H soils have been a common problem where winter wheat is grown continuously. However, this problem has become more widespread in Kansas, according to a K-State agronomist. He encourages wheat growers to test their soils for p-H levels ahead of fall planting as he visits with Agriculture Today’s Eric Atkinson.

Track5  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
ARE YOU PREPARED FOR DISASTER?
Nearly 40 percent of Kansas’ 105 counties have been declared major disaster areas this year due to severe weather events this spring. But not all disasters come in the form of a major storm – and not everyone is prepared when disaster strikes. K-State Research and Extension has developed a program to help people prepare for disasters by completing a series of weekly activities throughout September. Extension family resource management specialist Elizabeth Kiss (kish) says Prepare Kansas – which coincides with the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s National Preparedness Month – was launched last year.

Track6  (:25)  Q…the challenge tasks.
ESTABLISH A COMMUNICATION PLAN
Creating a communication plan for the family to follow during a disaster is one of the first challenges participants are asked to complete. Because there’s no guarantee that phone service will be available, that shouldn’t be your primary form of communication. Kiss (kish) says your communication plan should reflect what works best for your family – because the goal is to reduce stress by knowing everyone is safe.

Track7  (:35)  Q…some of the stress.
WEEKLY TASKS ARE EASY TO MANAGE
Other challenges include making an emergency supply kit; assembling a “grab and go” kit for each family member – including pets; and practicing a fire drill. Kiss (kish) says they discovered that breaking the tasks into weekly challenges increases participation and produces the best results.

Track8  (:23)  Q…like it's very doable.
ASK CHILDREN TO HELP DO THE TASKS
While most children probably wouldn’t have had much fun doing last year’s financial challenge, Kiss (kish) says this year’s challenge is not only more kid-friendly, it’s something they should be involved in.

Track9  (:24)  Q…for them and empowering.
THERE’S STILL TIME TO GET REGISTERED
Prepare Kansas begins September 1st, but Kiss (kish) says you have until September 6th to register.

Track10  (:38)  Q…to that again.

Tag:Additional information about Prepare Kansas is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
KANSAS PROFILE
ETHAN ECK (ehk) – CHEM-BLADE
Ron Wilson of K-State’s Huck Boyd Institute profiles a rural Kansan whose award-winning invention is helping agricultural producers save time and money.

Track11  (4:26)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
FIRST CALVING AGE
An important indicator of dairy herd productivity is the age of the herd’s dairy heifers at first calving. That was confirmed in recent research, which then went on to link that to the size of the dairy herd and to the frequency of daily milking. The findings are worth considering, especially for smaller-herd operators, as outlined this week by K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook).

Track12  (2:00)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
LEAD VS. STEEL SHOT
There’s been a push in recent years to discourage the use of lead shot in upland game bird hunting, over concerns about toxicity to wildlife. One non-toxic alternative to lead ammunition is steel shot. And a recent study in Texas compared the performance of steel shot to lead shot in actual, in-field dove hunting. K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee reports on the findings.

Track13  (4:58)  Q…(theme music).
PERSPECTIVE
ACCEPTING DISOBEDIENCE
How often are orders carried out even though they may raise questions? Orders that could in some way lead to harm. What is it about our society or how we were raised that seems to interfere with our moral compass? The examples are many and easy to find where good people refused to question their superiors. Examples such as financial fraud or war crimes…and the excuse is too often simply we were following orders. One researcher says we must relearn how to speak up…how to make our voices heard.

Track14  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
LAWN AND GARDEN
PLANTORAMA: LANDSCAPE INSECT CONCERNS
Though the summer is winding down, homeowners should be mindful of a couple of potential insect problems in their landscapes, according to a K-State horticultural entomologist. This week, he addresses what to do about late-season grubs in home lawns and fall webworms in hardwood trees…and he comments on responding to 17-year cicada damage to trees.

Track15  (5:00)  Q…(theme music).
SOUND LIVING
ARE YOU PREPARED FOR DISASTER?
Nearly 40 percent of Kansas’ 105 counties have been declared major disaster areas this year alone due to severe weather events this spring. But not all disasters come in the form of a major storm. When a home floods or is damaged by fire, it’s a disaster for the homeowner, renter or business owner. For that reason, some emergency responders say “all disasters are local” and that’s why K-State Research and Extension has developed a program to help people prepare for disasters. Extension family resource management specialist Elizabeth Kiss (kish) says Prepare Kansas, an online challenge focusing on simple weekly activities, makes it easier for individuals and families to become better prepared.

Track16  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
17-YEAR CICADA
As the 17-year cicada season has come to an end, a lot of tree owners are wondering if these red-eyed insects caused any damage to their hardwood trees. K-State forester health specialist Ryan Armbrust (AHRM-broost) talks about the likelihood of that, and what to do if there was any damage left behind.

Track17  (1:58)  Q…(theme music).
(same as above but without music bed)


Track18  (1:45)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WEATHER WONDERS
HISTORIC TORNADO OUTBREAK
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp (nap) looks back 40 years to a devastating tornado storm system.

Track19  (1:03)  Q…K-State Research and Extension.
TORNADO NUMBERS
Kansas has a reputation of being a magnet for tornadoes, but other states have it worse, according to K-State climatologist Mary Knapp.

Track20  (1:06)  Q…K-State Research and Extension.
DEADLIEST KANSAS TORNADO
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp says a devastating tornado 60 years ago led to the creation of weather warning systems in use today.

Track21  (:57)  Q…K-State Research and Extension.
WHEAT SCOOP
EMPLOYMENT IN AGRICULTURE
Career opportunities in agriculture and related fields continue to mushroom at an impressive rate. This was confirmed in a recent study, which bodes well for young people in pursuit of such careers. Marsha Boswell has more in this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track22  (2:53)  Q…I'm Marsha Boswell.



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