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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   11/24/2014...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
WHEAT YIELD APP


Track1  (3:01)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT FREEZE DAMAGE


Track2  (2:58)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
CORN PERFORMANCE TEST


Track3  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
WHEAT YIELD APP
There’s been a new development in assessing the potential of your winter wheat stands through a smart phone app. Kansas State agronomy specialist Ray Asebedo (AH-sah-BAY-doh) has been a main contributor in creating this new technology. This application offers simple and easy-to-use features. Asebedo says it can be used throughout the growing season, in different environmental conditions, helping a producer forecast potential yields.

Track4  (:42)  Q…throughout the seasons.
This app was made to be user friendly and can be used to evaluate all wheat varieties.

Track5  (:42)  Q…be out there.
One does not need to wait to use this app, says Asebedo. A producer is able to assess fields as they go into dormancy, to help with management decisions.

Track6  (:36)  Q...going to do.

Tag:That was K-State’s Ray Asebedo talking about a new phone app technology from K-State that can be used to assess growing conditions of winter wheat. Search “Kansas wheat calculator” to access this app on your smart phone.
WHEAT FREEZE DAMAGE
Kansas endured an unusually sharp plunge in temperatures in the second week of November…this following a run of warm weather in the days leading up to that change. This has led many wheat growers to wonder about the cold hardiness of their new stands. K-State agronomist Stu Duncan points out that some wheat fields were likely far enough along that they had developed that all-important cold hardiness.

Track7  (:39)  Q…could have some issues.
To get a better idea of the possibility of cold damage to winter wheat, though, the producer really needs to inspect the crown of the plant, and not pay that much attention to the foliage damage.

Track8  (:35)  Q...issue you could have.
And a simple way to test for cold damage is to take random plant samples from a field indoors and monitor their growth.

Track9  (:33)  Q…yes, you'll see that.

Tag:On assessing freeze damage to winter wheat at this stage of the season, that’s K-State agronomist Stu Duncan.
CORN PERFORMANCE TEST
That all-important information for Kansas corn growers is now compiled and ready for review. It’s the 2014 Kansas Corn Performance Test report…the summary of K-State’s statewide field tests of corn hybrid yields. This information is extremely useful to the grower in their seed selection for next year. The K-State agronomist in charge of the performance test, Jane Lingenfelser (LING-en-fell-zer), notes that it was a good year for corn production in Kansas overall, and that shows up in the test numbers.

Track10  (:21)  Q…a good boost.
The report includes disease resistance ratings for the hybrids included in the field trials. It was a generally light year for diseases in corn, says Lingenfelser, with some notable exceptions.

Track11  (:40)  Q...because of these diseases.
Likewise, the insect pressure on Kansas corn this year wasn’t too overwhelming, although the test report does offer helpful information on that score as well.

Track12  (:41)  Q...the overall plant health.

Tag:That’s K-State agronomist Jane Lingenfelser. The 2014 Kansas Corn Performance Test report can be found at www.agronomy.ksu.edu, or through your local Extension office.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
AVOIDING THE JANUARY HANGOVER
The euphoria of holiday shopping we experience in November and December can quickly turn into a financial hangover when the credit card statements arrive in January. While shopping is part of the holiday celebration, it doesn’t have to leave you with a huge debt to deal with after the holidays are over. K-State Research and Extension family financial specialist Elizabeth Kiss (kish) says a key to surviving the holidays in good financial shape is to have your spending fit within your budget.

Track13  (:57)  Q...let other things go.
ONLINE SHOPPING IS HERE TO STAY
In addition to hitting brick and mortar stores, Kiss (kish) says the number of consumers searching for holiday bargains online continues to grow.

Track14  (:44)  Q...the best price on it.
IS IT A GOOD PRICE? SHOULD I BUY?
Most consumers worry about getting the lowest price – especially for those big ticket items. Kiss (kish) says doing some homework before buying will enable you to recognize a good price on that particular item.

Track15  (:27)  Q...we're willing to pay.
KEEPING TRACK OF YOUR SPENDING
One of the more difficult things about holiday shopping is keeping track of how much we’re spending. Between credit cards, shopping online, and shopping on multiple days, it can be almost impossible to keep a running total of how much we’ve spent. Kiss (kish) says one way to avoid overspending is to make a list and pay with cash, check or debit card.

Track16  (:32)  Q...doesn't take long, actually.
BUDGETING FOR HOLIDAY SPENDING
Kiss (kish) says one thing to remember about holiday shopping is that everything must be paid for – either at the time of purchase or in the coming months.

Track17  (:30)  Q...and not stressful.

Tag:More information on developing a household budget is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
STORING GARDEN PESTICIDES
The recent weather has left little doubt that winter is here. And a K-State horticulturist has a word for homeowners about storing away their unused lawn and garden pesticides until next spring. Most products can be successfully stored for future use, according to Gregg Eyestone…and the guidelines for doing so are always listed on each product’s label.

Track18  (:43)  Q...best information you can.
STANDARD STORAGE RECOMMENDATIONS
Every lawn and garden pesticide label will read a bit differently. However, there are some standard recommendations on winter storage of pesticides that apply to just about all products, as Eyestone explains.

Track19  (:29)  Q...and things like that.
EMPTY PESTICIDE CONTAINERS
If one has one, or a collection of, empty horticultural pesticide containers around going into the winter, there is a right way of disposing of those, particularly in the case of liquid pesticide containers. Eyestone goes over those steps.

Track20  (:54)  Q...put it in the trash.
DATING GARDEN PESTICIDES
Another idea that Eyestone endorses is recording the purchase dates of all lawn and garden pesticides, either on a ledger or on the product container itself. That will take the guesswork out of the freshness of the product as it’s eventually removed from winter storage.

Track21  (:49)   Q...product is still around.
LATE LAWN HERBICIDE APPLICATIONS
Fall lawn herbicide applications usually should be done while dandelions and other broadleaf weeds are still actively growing. The recent harsh cold weather severely slowed that growth. But if the weather warms back up sufficiently for a short time, there still may be an opportunity to apply that herbicide, according to Eyestone.

Track22  (1:00)  Q...will work out for us.
KANSAS PROFILE
JIM CORRELL – FAB LAB
Ron Wilson of K-State’s Huck Boyd Institute looks at an educator whose community college program is helping entrepreneurs design and build new products.

Track23  (4:32)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
TRANSPARENT MILKING UNITS
There is a new style of dairy milking device that producers might want to take a hard look at, according to K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook). They feature transparent liners and shells, allowing the producer or milking operator to see directly what’s happening at the milking point of contact. And that, says Brouk, can be advantageous in milk parlor management, as he outlines this week.

Track24  (2:00)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
PRAIRIE DOGS AND ROAD NOISE
Like most other indigenous wildlife species, prairie dogs prefer a tranquil environment. A group of researchers in Colorado wanted to know of traffic noise from roadways has any effect on prairie dog behavior…and their study indicates that indeed, it does. In reviewing their findings, K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee says that noise could turn out to be a useful prairie dog control tool.

Track25  (4:58)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
AVOIDING THE JANUARY HANGOVER
The euphoria of holiday shopping we experience in November and December can quickly turn into a financial hangover when the credit card statements arrive in January. While shopping is part of the holiday celebration, it doesn’t have to leave a huge debt to deal with after the holiday. K-State Research and Extension family financial specialist Elizabeth Kiss (kish) discusses how to have a happy holiday and not wake up with a January hangover.

Track26  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
CHRISTMAS TREE CARE
A real Christmas tree can give your house a fresh holiday scent. Kansas State forestry specialist Charlie Barden talks about selecting and managing a fresh-cut Christmas tree. The main thing to concentrate on is consistently supplying the tree with sufficient moisture during its holiday stay indoors.

Track27  (1:57)  Q…(theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)


Track28  (1:46)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
THE TRUTH ABOUT GLYPHOSATE
Recent articles have circulated the internet, accusing wheat of being unsafe because of the use of glyphosate herbicide. A staff member with Kansas Wheat, did some research into the scientific facts about glyphosate use. Marsha Boswell has more on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (3:02)  Q…for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
BLIZZARD
K-State Climatologist Mary Knapp (nap) explains that for meteorological purposes, certain weather conditions must be met in order for a storm to be called a blizzard.

Track30  (1:01)  Q…Research and Extension.
FREEZE THAW CYCLE
Fluctuating winter temperatures cause water to freeze, then thaw, then freeze again, and that cycle can be especially damaging in Kansas, according to K-State Climatologist Mary Knapp.

Track31  (1:04)  Q…Research and Extension.
THANKSGIVING STORMS IN KANSAS
K-State Climatologist Mary Knapp looks at Turkey Day storms from years past.

Track32  (1:16)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
A TWO-GENERATION APPROACH TO POVERTY – PART ONE
A new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation calls for comprehensive efforts to lift kids out of poverty, including delivering high quality early childhood education and providing parents with access to job training and other tools that will enable them to support their families. The recommendations propose integrating state and federal employment, education and child care programs for parents and children to create better opportunities for families. The guest is Laura Speer, associate director for policy reform and advocacy with the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.