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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   04/11/2014...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
INSECT DIAGNOSTIC LABORATORY


Track1  (3:01)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
CONTROLLING ALFALFA WEEVILS


Track2  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
PASTURE DROUGHT PLANNING


Track3  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
INSECT DIAGNOSTIC LABORATORY
Kansas State University remains one of the few universities to still operate an insect diagnostic laboratory for public use. The laboratory offers services to agricultural producers dealing with insect pests. K-State insect diagnostician Eva Zurek (ZUR-ick) oversees all projects and services. Even though the laboratory has grown, it still provides producers with the services of sampling and identification.

Track4  (:30)  Q…that as well.
The laboratory accepts physical samples but also accommodates electronic identification as well.

Track5  (:50)  Q...of that insect.
Additional information is required to be submitted with the sample, so that the laboratory can provide all the information the producer is looking for.

Track6  (:45)  Q...Extension diagnostic service.

Tag:That was K-State’s Eva Zurek, informing producers of the variety of services offered at the K-State Insect Diagnostic Laboratory.
CONTROLLING ALFALFA WEEVILS
Alfalfa producers look to protect all crops against unwanted pests, such as the alfalfa weevil. Crop scouts have recently confirmed this pest, especially in the southern part of Kansas. K-State crop entomologist Jeff Whitworth gives the latest briefing on alfalfa weevil activity. Early weevil development can occur in average cool temperatures.

Track7  (:35)  Q…units have accumulated.
Lingering cool temperatures will help to temper weevil activity, which will contribute to a producer’s decision on when to treat these pests.

Track8  (:38)  Q...your alfalfa weevils.
Whitworth gives his best advice on treating the alfalfa weevil, to see best results in one’s stands.

Track9  (:51)  Q…pretty good control.

Tag:That was K-State crop entomologist Jeff Whitworth, offering that input on early spring control of the unwanted alfalfa weevil.
PASTURE DROUGHT PLANNING
The ongoing lack of moisture is forcing cattle producers to think about management alternatives even before the grazing season starts. One such possibility is early weaning spring-born calves later in the summer. K-State beef veterinarian Larry Hollis asks producers to think pro-actively about early weaning as an option, if pastures remain under dry weather stress.

Track10  (:36)  Q…groceries for them.
Another benefit of early weaning is that cattle producers may be selling calves for a higher price at market.

Track11  (:48)  Q...move clock forward.
Hollis recommends preparing feed resources in case early weaning does take place.

Track12  (:39)  Q...through the summer.

Tag:That was K-State’s Larry Hollis addressing the early signs of drought effects on cattle grazing, and the potential benefits of early weaning.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
GETTING THE GRILL READY
The onset of warmer weather is typically accompanied by the familiar smell of burning charcoal and grilled meat wafting through the air. To capture consumer trends around grilling and barbecuing, every two years since 1983, the Hearth, Patio and Barbecue Association conducts the HPBA Barbecue Lifestyle, Usage and Attitude Study. According to that study, outdoor cooking is on the rise, the majority of grill owners grill year-round, and nearly all grill owners used their grill in the last year. Traditional summer holidays – Fourth of July, Memorial Day and Labor Day – are the most popular grilling holidays. However, grilling Thanksgiving meals outdoors is increasingly popular among charcoal grill owners. As the grilling season gets underway for most people across Kansas, it’s time to get the grill ready to use. For many, that means firing up the grill to burn off whatever was leftover from last year. K-State Research and Extension food scientist Karen Blakeslee says that works to a certain degree, but she says a more thorough cleaning is recommended.

Track13  (:26)  Q...to start with.

Tag:Also, clean out any leftover ashes or wood from inside a charcoal grill and make sure the vents are clear of debris. For gas grills, check the connection points from the tank to the grill for leaks, check the hoses for cracks, clean and evenly disperse the lava rocks around the burner, and if needed, add more lava rocks. Blakeslee also says to put the grill on a flat cement surface, not on the grass. This will help prevent it from tipping over and starting a grass fire.
COMMON SENSE FOOD SAFETY
When handling food for outdoor cooking, Blakeslee says that just a little common sense can go a long way in preventing food mistakes from occurring.

Track14  (:42)  Q...it’s pretty simple.
USING A MEAT THERMOMETER
Two common grilling mistakes are undercooking and overcooking meat. Blakeslee, who is also the coordinator of the university’s Rapid Response Center, says this can be avoided by using a meat thermometer to make sure the meat has reached the proper internal temperature.

Track15  (:51)  Q...in the end.
USE FISH PANS AND SKEWERS
If you’re grilling something that could easily fall apart or slip between the grill grates, such as fish or small chunks of meat, Blakeslee suggests using skewers or specially designed fish pans.

Track16  (:38)  Q...come in really handy.
MEAL PLANNING AND TIMING
– If you’re doing an entire meal on the grill, Blakeslee says to plan the meal carefully and place food items on the grill according to how long it takes them to cook – that way everything is done at the same time and ready to be served.

Track17  (:22)  Q...timing is important.

Tag:More information on grilling and food safety is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu. Additional food safety information is available on the university’s Rapid Response Center website: www.rrc.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
A POLLINATOR-FRIENDLY HABITAT
Fruit crops and cultivars should be carefully chosen. They should be adapted to location and growing conditions. Some small plants, such as strawberries, can be replanted in three or four years, but fruit trees, such as apples and pears, can remain productive for more than 25 years. Pollination requirements vary among fruit crops. Although pollen is carried by the wind and some plants are self-pollinating, about 90-percent of plants require assistance for pollination. Honeybees and wild bees are the most important pollinating insects for fruit crops, but many other insects serve as pollinators. Riley County Extension horticulture agent Gregg Eyestone says you can attract many of these native insect pollinators to your home landscape by creating an insect-friendly habitat.

Track18  (:40)  Q...for our pollinators.

Tag:More information on creating a pollinator-friendly habitat is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
TIMING CRABGRASS PREVENTERS
Crabgrass preventers are another name for pre-emergence herbicides that prevent crabgrass seeds from developing into mature plants. Although many people have a somewhat foggy idea of how crabgrass preventers work, K-State Research and Extension horticulturist Ward Upham (up-umm) says many don’t realize that they don’t actually kill the crabgrass seeds.

Track19  (:17)  Q...and then dies.

Tag:Additionally, preventers do not last forever. Micro-organisms and natural processes begin to gradually break them down soon after they are applied. If some products are applied too early, they may have lost much of their strength by the time they are needed. Most crabgrass preventers are fairly ineffective after about 60 days.
WHEN CRABGRASS GERMINATES
– For most of Kansas, crabgrass typically begins to germinate around May 1st or a little later. Upham says April 15th is a good target date for applying a preventer because it gives the active ingredients time to activate and evenly disperse in the soil before crabgrass germination starts.

Track20  (:14)  Q...eventually dies.

Tag:Depending on the weather, the timing of crabgrass germination can vary. As a result, homeowners can also base the timing of their crabgrass preventer application on the bloom of ornamental plants. Upham says the Eastern redbud is a good choice. When the trees in your area approach full bloom, apply crabgrass preventer.
SINGLE APPLICATION HERBICIDES
To avoid having to do a second application about eight weeks after the first application, Upham says to use a product that gives season-long control of crabgrass from a single application, such as Barricade or Dimension.

Track21  (:37)  Q...Dimension in it.
LESS CRABGRASS IN THICK LAWNS
The best defense against crabgrass doesn’t come in a bottle. It comes from having a healthy lawn. Upham says homeowners who have a good thick lawn may not need to treat at all.

Track22  (:16)  Q...good and thick.

Tag:Upham says Dimension is the best choice for treating a lawn that was planted late last fall.
KANSAS PROFILE
DENNIS VANDERPOOL – AYS
An organization that began as an orphanage to care for children from the great flu epidemic of the early 1900s, has altered its mission through the years to give disadvantaged young people an opportunity at a better life. Ron Wilson, director of the Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development at Kansas State University, details how this organization is serving some four-to-five thousand kids each year through a variety of programs.

Track23  (4:24)  Q...with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
THE 2014 FORAGE SEASON
As we move into spring, winter annuals are starting to develop out in the fields and alfalfa is starting to break dormancy. K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook) says producers should be taking an inventory now of the stored forages they have available for the summer months. This week, he discusses several forage options and alternatives for producers who think they’ll need additional forage.

Track24  (2:00)  Q...(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
WILD HORSE ISSUE
Steadily over the last 40 years, free-ranging horse and burrow numbers have swelled in parts of the West. And in fact, under agreements with the Bureau of Land Management, several thousand of these animals reside in Kansas and Oklahoma. A recent study was commissioned, in an attempt to address the rapid wild horse and burrow population growth, and the severe harm that growth is inflicting on natural ecosystems. K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee reports on that effort.

Track25  (5:00)  Q...(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
GRILLING AND FOOD SAFETY
According to the Hearth, Patio and Barbecue Association, 86-percent of households own an outdoor barbecue, grill or smoker and 62-percent of grill owners use them year-round. A gas grill is the most popular, followed by charcoal and electric. The Fourth of July, Memorial Day and Labor Day top the list of the most popular grilling holidays, but there has been an increase in grilling Thanksgiving meals outdoors. On today’s Sound Living: Kansas State University food scientist Karen Blakeslee discusses grilling safety and food safety concerns associated with outdoor cooking.

Track26  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
A SPRING WALK IN THE WOODS
By all accounts, this spring is about two weeks behind normal and about four weeks behind last year’s early spring. Although Mother Nature may have delayed the bloom of some plants and trees this year, K-State Research and Extension forester Charles Barden says it’s still a great time to take a walk in the woods and enjoy what nature has to offer.

Track27  (1:51)  Q...(theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)


Track28  (1:45)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
FOCUSING ON KEY MILLING PRINCIPLES
Kansas State University’s International Grains Program is offering a pair of courses designed to provide additional training to milling professionals and other end-users of Kansas-grown products. The week-long basic and advanced milling principles courses are designed for different segments of industry professionals, but both courses focus on key milling principles. Marsha Boswell discusses the benefits these courses offer milling professionals and Kansas producers.

Track29  (2:58)  Q...for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
EASTER BLIZZARD OF 1873
It may be spring, but that doesn’t mean winter weather is completely behind us. To prove that point, K-State climatologist Mary Knapp details a blizzard that raged from North Dakota to Kansas in mid-April, 1873 – resulting in huge snow drifts and tremendous cattle losses.

Track30  (:45)  Q...Research and Extension.
WHY SMOKE GETS TRAPPED
Spring burn season has arrived and there have been several days when the smoke lingers and fails to dissipate. K-State climatologist Mary Knapp says one of the major reasons for lingering smoke has been an inversion – which traps the smoke at the surface until the inversion is displaced or the cap erodes.

Track31  (:43)  Q...Research and Extension.
UNDERSTANDING WIND SPEED
Just as the temperature can be reported in Celsius or Fahrenheit, wind speed can be reported in knots, miles per hour and one meter per second. According to K-State climatologist Mary Knapp, understanding these different types of wind speed measurements is really the only way to know just how windy it is.

Track32  (:44)  Q...Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
THE QUESTION OF MALENESS AND FEMALENESS
The discussion of sex, any discussion of sex, has always been a touchy subject. What constitutes femaleness and maleness? What is the interaction between cultural gender norms and genetic theories of sex? Do cultural gender norms influence genetic theories of sex? These and other questions have been debated since the beginning of the twentieth century. Part of that debate includes a search for male and female in the human genome. Guest: Sarah Richardson is the author of Sex Itself: The Search for Male and Female in the Human Genome. She is also an assistant professor of the History of Science and of Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality at Harvard University.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.