K-State home » K-State Research and Extension »  News  » Radio Network » Weekly Features
K-State Research and Extension News

K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   10/17/2014...


(Audiofiles are 44.1khz/mono/48kbps.)
Download problems? E-mail us or call us at 785-532-5851
AGRICULTURE FEATURES
FALL GRAZING STOVER


Track1  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
FALL SOIL TESTING


Track2  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
IGP INSTITUTE FOOD SAFETY


Track3  (3:02)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
FALL GRAZING STOVER
K-State beef specialist Dale Blasi (BLAH-zee) has had past experience dealing with cattle on crop stover, which can be a good nutrient resource for beef herds. This will let producers provide an inexpensive and nutritious grazing opportunity for their cattle during the fall season. There are differences in the feed value of various crop residues, and the producer should consider that before turning cattle out.

Track4  (:43)  Q…has been accomplished.
Blasi says that producers need to fully recognize the nutrient needs of the animals they’re putting out on that residue, making sure that everything matches up.

Track5  (:47)   Q…prior to calving.
Cow-calf producers should still provide an adequate nutrient supplement to their herds on stover ground when necessary.

Track6  (:33)   Q...daily cow needs.

Tag:That was K-State’s Dale Blasi, addressing the topic of grazing beef animals on crop residue post-harvest.
FALL SOIL TESTING
Once the row crop harvest is all wrapped up for the fall, growers can get a jump on their nutrient management for next year’s crops by taking a soil test shortly after harvest. A K-State crop nutrient specialist encourages that idea. Dave Mengel points to the generally productive cropping year we’ve had as a reason for drawing soil samples for analysis this fall.

Track7  (:32)   Q…make some appropriate plans.
And a post-harvest soil test can render useful information on the main crop nutrients, especially with respect to residual nitrogen left after the cropping season.

Track8  (:46)  Q...soil test phosphorus level.
n that nitrogen is mobile in the soil, one might wonder if the information from fall soil sampling will have value come spring planting time. Research indicates that it will, according to Mengel.

Track9  (:33)  Q…a whole lot of difference.

Tag:Promoting soil testing of row crop fields following this fall’s harvest, that’s K-State crop nutrient specialist Dave Mengel.
IGP INSTITUTE FOOD SAFETY
K-State’s I-G-P Institute, in the past known as the International Grains Program, has been focusing on grain food and feed processing education this past month. The director of the institute, Mark Fowler, says that the topic of food safety has been the main theme. This latest round of courses for domestic millers has pertained to HACCP program requirements.

Track10  (:46)  Q…for human consumption.
Fowler lists some examples of critical control points. One of those begins at the receiving point.

Track11  (:36)  Q...for your customer.
And he points out that, in food and feedgrain processing, there is a difference between checkpoints for quality and checkpoints for safety.

Track12  (:47)  Q...that product permanently.

Tag:That was K-State’s Mark Fowler, reporting on recent milling product safety education efforts at the university’s I-G-P Institute.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
REVIEW YOUR CREDIT REPORT
When it comes to personal finance management, there are a multitude of things that can affect our overall health. This includes our credit score, whether we have a contingency fund for emergencies, making sure we have adequate insurance coverage and choosing a bank that is right for our needs. K-State Research and Extension family resource management specialist Elizabeth Kiss (KISH) says one of the most important things we can do is review our credit report once a year.

Track13  (:43)  Q...charge you for credit.

Tag:Kiss (Kish) says consumers can obtain a free copy of their credit report annually from all three reporting agencies at: www.annualcreditreport.com.
CREDIT RATING CONSIDERATIONS
Kiss (KISH) says there a variety of factors that can positively and negatively affect your credit score.

Track14  (:35)  Q...credit report, as well.

Tag:Kiss says it’s important to check all three credit reports annually to make sure the information is correct. Incorrect information in just one of the reports could affect your credit score and result in being denied credit or having to pay a higher interest rate.
IS YOUR INSURANCE ADEQUATE?
Whether it’s home, auto or life insurance, most people don’t want to invest much time dealing with it. And, after it’s been purchased, they often fail to review it. This could cost them more in premiums and leave them exposed in the event of an accident. Kiss (KISH) says we need to understand that insurance is protection against risk.

Track15  (:50)  Q...in our insurance pool.
ESTABLISH A CONTINGENCY FUND
Although many people live paycheck to paycheck, it’s important to take a few dollars from every check and put it into a contingency fund for emergencies. Kiss (KISH) says this fund is not for regular or periodic expenses – it’s only for covering unexpected expenses.

Track16  (:49)  Q...better than nothing.
EVEN A LITTLE SAVINGS HELPS
Although the amount in a contingency fund will vary for each person or family, Kiss (KISH) says everyone should have some cash available for unexpected expenses.

Track17  (:30)  Q...interest rate you’re at.

Tag:More information on personal finance is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
FINAL TOMATO HARVEST
The vegetable gardening season is nearing the very end. Those gardeners with tomatoes still on the vine should be watching the weather forecast closely. If a hard freeze is imminent, whatever fruit is still out there should be picked. K-State horticulturist Ward Upham offers some tips on knowing whether a late tomato is suitable for picking.

Track18  (:38)  Q...once you bring it inside.
SORTING AND STORING TOMATOES
It could well be that a gardener’s last tomato harvest will consist of fruit at varying stages of maturity. So when it comes to storing those for use after they’re picked, Upham suggests sorting those by their level of ripeness.

Track19  (:37)  Q...are going to be fine.
STORING LAST PEPPERS
Much as with late tomatoes, gardeners should go ahead and pick their late peppers before the next hard freeze as well. And their durability allows one to store them easily, either at room temperature for a time, or by freezing. Upham talks about both approaches.

Track20  (:51)  Q...they become mushy anyway.
COOL-SEASON VEGETABLES
By their very nature, cool-season vegetables bear up quite well as fall temperature decline. But their actual cold-weather hardiness varies from crop to crop. Upham that some can endure a freeze just fine, while others are only semi-hardy.

Track21  (:50)  Q...and continue to grow.
STORING COOL-SEASON VEGETABLES
When it does finally come time to harvest the less-hardy cool-season vegetables, there are a few simple guidelines for storing them inside as well. And some of the hardier subsoil vegetables can simply be left in the garden for a long time, and harvested as needed.

Track22  (:50)  Q...what the temperatures are.
KANSAS PROFILE
CARL REED - TALLGRASS EXPRESS
Ron Wilson, director of the Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development at Kansas State University, looks at Carl Reed, Kansas singer and songwriter. (SPECIAL NOTE FOR THIS WEEK’S PROGRAM: This “special edition” of the program features music by a country music artist. The usual outcue, “Kansas Profile,” occurs at @ 3:40, followed by another 50 seconds of music. This week’s program is also in stereo, rather than mono, so the file is a bit bigger.)

Track23  (4:32)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
CHECKING MILK FLOW
Consistent milk flow at milking time is essential on every dairy. And producers would do well to check their milk trafficking systems in their dairies, to assure that flow is sufficient. K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (Brook) suggests several check points for milk flow, and cites the numerous reasons why this is important.

Track24  (1:59)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
DEER AND COYOTE PREDATION
When deer numbers appear to be down, hunters and others often point to predation by coyotes as the cause, according to K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee. The research on this subject has produced mixed results, but he says there’s good reason to think that coyotes are not a major contributor to a drop in the deer population in a state like Kansas. He elaborates on that this week.

Track25  (5:00)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
IS IT TIME FOR A FINANCIAL CHECKUP?
When it comes to personal financial management, there are a number of things that can affect your overall health. This includes your credit score, whether you have a contingency fund for emergencies, making sure you have adequate insurance coverage and choosing a bank that’s right for you. On today’s Sound Living: K-State Research and Extension family resource management specialist Elizabeth Kiss (KISH) offers some tips for making financial decisions that will improve your overall financial health.

Track26  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
KNOW YOUR FIREWOOD
The chill of fall means that the home wood-burning season is here. Nothing takes the edge off a cold day like a fire in the wood stove or fireplace, says K-State forester Charlie Barden. And he says that one should be familiar with the heating capabilities of the various tree species before purchasing wood or cutting one’s own. This week, he offers some helpful guidelines.

Track27  (1:53)  Q…theme music).
(same as above, but without music)


Track28  (1:48)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
WORLD FOOD PRIZE
Dr. Norman Borlaug’s semi-dwarf wheat spurred the Green Revolution and saved more than a billion lives from starvation. The 2014 World Food Prize, which Borlaug created, is being awarded to a wheat researcher for the first time…and it happens to be Borlaug’s successor. Marsha Boswell has more on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (2:59)  Q…for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
FROZEN PRECIPITATION
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp (nap) explains that the term can have any number of meanings.

Track30  (1:09)  Q…Research and Extension.
HURRICANE MITCH
At this time of year, many remember one of the most devastating hurricanes in this region’s history. K-State climatologist Mary Knapp looks back.

Track31  (1:03)  Q…Research and Extension.
CARBON MONOXIDE
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp warns of the dangers that can occur if caution is not taken during the cooler month when we rely on heat sources in the home.

Track32  (1:09)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
FEEDING A HUNGRY WORLD
The food problems faced by India are not unique. For those experts looking ahead to feeding an ever-growing world population, there is concern about the problems faced by India and more that could lead to a global shortfall of food between now and 2050. According to one expert, their fears are based in part on the projected growth in global population, the impact of improved wealth, and the impact of urbanization on the available land and labor to produce crops. Today's guest, David Everitt, is the retired president of John Deere's Agriculture and Turf Division – North America, Asia, Australia, and Sub-Saharan and South Africa, and Global Tractor and Turf Products. Prior to his retirement, he also had enterprise-wide responsibility for Information Technology and the Intelligent Solutions Group.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.