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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   08/01/2014...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
SUMMER ANNUAL FORAGES


Track1  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
USDA GROUND BEEF PROPOSAL


Track2  (3:01)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SEED AND HERBICIDES


Track3  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
SUMMER ANNUAL FORAGES
During the summer season, many beef cattle producers are producing their annual summer forages. And in doing so, maximizing the quality and quantity of forages can lead to producing high quality feedstuffs for cattle herds. K-State beef cattle specialist Dale Blasi (BLAS-ee) talks about the diverse uses the forage offers, depending on what the producer’s needs are.

Track4  (:42)  Q…minimal diet upsets.
If a producer chooses to harvest forages at an early point in time, they may choose to graze out the regrowth. Depending on the forage, Blasi says it may be a good opportunity.

Track5  (:42)  Q...a great opportunity.
Looking at nutritional values, a producer may want to consider ensiling their summer forage verses baling it.

Track6  (:38)  Q...and all that.

Tag:That was K-State’s Dale Blasi addressing the topic of summer annual forage production for beef cattle feeding.
USDA GROUND BEEF PROPOSAL
The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service is proposing all makers of raw ground beef should begin to keep track of their records in order to ensure a safe product to the daily consumer. By doing so, this would allow retailers to trace back the origin of a product to prevent less foodborne illnesses. K-State meat scientist Travis O’Quinn talks about what rules and regulations would be implemented if the USDA adopts this proposal.

Track7  (:35)  Q…consuming affective products.
O’Quinn says consumers may expect to experience already packaged products ready for market sale.

Track8  (:42)   Q...service type setting.
Presently, this is only a proposal. O’Quinn says the USDA will review all comments before deciding the next action to be taken.

Track9  (:40)   Q…required for retailers.

Tag:That was K-State meat scientist Travis O’Quinn, speaking about the proposal recently released by the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service to track product sources of ground beef.
WHEAT SEED AND HERBICIDES
The wheat harvest in several parts of Kansas this year was complicated by a late spurt of heavy weed infestations in ripened fields. Numerous producers turned to pre-harvest herbicide applications, to knock those weeds out of the way before the combines rolled. Those herbicide treatments, in turn, may have damaged that wheat’s ability to serve as seed for the next crop. The seed laboratory manager for the Kansas Crop Improvement Association based at K-State, Eric Fabrizius (fah-BRITCH-us), talks about the situation.

Track10  (:49)  Q…embryo in that seed.
Fabrizius is strongly urging producers who are saving back their own seed for planting this fall to have that seed tested for germination first, at a qualified laboratory.

Track11  (:48)  Q...planted this fall.
Alternately, producers can avoid any germination worries by simply planting certified wheat seed this fall.

Track12  (:11)  Q...that germ test.

Tag:That’s Eric Fabrizius of the Kansas Crop Improvement Association, on the added importance of assuring wheat seed germination performance coming out of this year’s harvest.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
BALANCE ACTIVITIES AND FAMILY TIME
As school starts this fall, children will have an opportunity to participate in a variety of activities. But choosing which activities to do can cause both excitement and stress for students and parents. It’s a natural tendency for parents to want to provide opportunities for their children, but too many activities can infringe on family time. K-State Research and Extension family systems specialist Charlotte Shoup-Olsen says that while it’s important for children to be involved in activities, there should be a balance between activities and family.

Track13  (:34)  Q...about those decisions.
TALK, LISTEN AND OBSERVE
As children and parents try to determine which activities to pursue, Olsen suggests parents talk with the child, listen to them and observe what they like to do. She says before looking at the cost and time commitment of an activity, see where the child’s interests lie – in other words, what is it they really enjoy doing?

Track14  (:28)  Q...setting some limits.
IT’S OKAY TO SET SOME LIMITS
There’s always going to be more activities for children to participate in than there is time. As a result, Olsen says parents will need to set some limits, especially if it reduces conflict in the family.

Track15  (:14)  Q...set those limits.
TEACH DECISION-MAKING SKILLS
Choosing which activities to participate in can be difficult. However, Olsen says having to make tough choices will help children improve their decision-making skills.

Track16  (:33)  Q...who are listening.
ACTIONS ARE LOUDER THAN WORDS
If parents want children to devote time for family activities, Olsen says they need to show them, not tell them, how much they value the time they spend together.

Track17  (:45)  Q...stayed together.

Tag:More information on managing family relationships is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
LATE BAGWORM CONTROL
Bagworm activity on landscape evergreens and other ornamental plants is now reaching its summer peak. K-State horticultural insect specialist Raymond Cloyd urges homeowners to take measures against bagworms now, or else expect another wave of bagworm damage next year. He suggests either of two control approaches.

Track18  (1:11)  Q...problems for next year.
SPIDER MITES ON TOMATOES
Though the temperatures have been somewhat up-and-down so far this summer, spider mites are nonetheless prevalent on garden tomatoes right now. Cloyd suggests that gardeners get after these tiny pests right away, and stay after them through the rest of the summer.

Track19  (1:14)  Q...the mid-day period.
TREATING WALNUT CATERPILLAR
We’re experiencing unusually high walnut caterpillar activity in Kansas landscapes this summer, according to Cloyd. These will attack walnut trees and several other hardwood species, and deserve the homeowner’s attention and control action.

Track20  (:40)  Q...for walnut caterpillar.
ELM LEAF BEETLE
Landscape elm trees can fall prey to an insect called the elm leaf beetle about this time of the year. Cloyd is seeing those beetles on elms now, and they can cause unsightly damage to the foliage. However, he says that oftentimes, the tree will simply outgrow the damage, and that spraying isn’t necessary.

Track21  (:38)  Q...about spraying anything.
GREEN JUNE BEETLE
Homeowners may notice a proliferation of a large bug called the green June beetle in and around their yards right now. Though primarily residing in lawn areas, they’ve been known to infest fruit trees, causing problems. Cloyd talks more about the pest and what to do about it.

Track22  (:45)  Q...or squish them.

Tag:More lawn and garden information is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
KANSAS PROFILE
TAD FELTS (PART TWO)
Not only is he an outstanding broadcaster, but he is also known for being a civic leader in the community, and has facilitated unique educational opportunities for local students. The director of the Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development, Ron Wilson tells the story of this local north-central Kansas legend.

Track23  (4:19)  Q...with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
MILKING FREQUENCY STUDY
Previous research trials have compared the dairy herd milking performance of three-times-a-day milking to two-times-a-day. New research finds that, when changing from a “2X” schedule to a “3X” schedule, the feeding programs for dairy cows and heifers need to change as well. This week, K-State Research and Extension dairy specialist Mike Brouk reports on those findings.

Track24  (2:00)  Q...(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
FERRUGINOUS HAWK DECLINE
Found in the High Plains region of western Kansas and adjoining states, the ferruginous hawk is an impressive predator which thrives on prairie dogs, ground squirrels and other prey commonly found in the area. Though it’s far from endangered, this hawk may well deserve some conservation attention, as K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee discusses this week.

Track25  (5:00)  Q...(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
BALANCING ACTIVITIES WITH FAMILY
As a new school year starts, there is typically a mix of anxiety, excitement and stress for students and parents as they consider all the opportunities available for outside activities. It’s natural for parents to want to provide opportunities for their children, while at the same time, protecting time for family activities. However, maintaining that balance is often difficult. On today’s Sound Living: balancing the time children spend on outside activities and the time they spend with family.

Track26  (14:50)  Q...K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
KANSAS TREE HISTORY
In the early history of Kansas, natives relied heavily upon trees growing along stream banks for their very survival. K-State forester Charlie Barden explains how trees remain an important part of everyday living, and what can happen when trees are removed for agricultural purposes.

Track27  (1:59)  Q...(theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)


Track28  (1:49)  Q...K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
NEW WHEAT VARIETY
Kansas State University released its first variety, Kanred, 100 years ago. Now, a century later, K-State, in conjunction with the Kansas Wheat Alliance, is unveiling its latest variety, KanMark. Marsha Boswell has more in this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (2:56)  Q...for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
YEAR WITHOUT A SUMMER
This summer has seen its share of temperature extremes…from typical hot days to stretches of abnormally cools days. But nearly 100 years ago, K-State climatologist Mary Knapp says a volcano led to what was called a “year without a summer.”

Track30  (1:09)  Q...Research and Extension.
HOTTEST SUMMER RECORDED
While we’ve had a few hot days in Kansas so far this summer, K-State climatologist Mary Knapp says they pale in comparison to the summer of 1936.

Track31  (:40)  Q...Research and Extension.
MOVEMENT OF TROPICAL STORMS
Tropical storms originating along the equator tend to be inconsistent in their movements. K-State climatologist Mary Knapp says there’s a simple climatological reason for that.

Track32  (:44)  Q...Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
THE THREAT OF MOSQUITO-BORNE DISEASE
The number of Americans infected with the mosquito-borne virus chikungunya has increased significantly and the virus has now been found in mosquitoes in the United States. In addition, at least 300 travel-related cases of chikungunya have been reported in 31 states. On today’s Perspective: the thoughts of one of the world’s leading researchers of the virus, who believes that many more people are at risk of becoming infected. Guest: Dr. Stephen Higgs, director of Kansas State's Biosecurity Research Institute (B-R-I). He also serves as Kansas State's associate vice president for research, the Peine (Pine) professor of biosecurity, and a professor of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology.

Track33  (27:00)  Q...K-State Radio Network.