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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   01/26/2015...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
USDA INNOVATIVE PROGRAM


Track1  (3:01)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
KANSAS TREE CONSERVATION


Track2  (3:01)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WEED CONTROL GUIDE


Track3  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
USDA INNOVATIVE PROGRAM
A new 13-million-dollar grant is being funded through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Regional Conservation Partnership Program to implement best forestry management practices on 25 thousand acres of Kansas land. This will be designated specifically for areas near streams and reservoirs. The Kansas Forest Service at K-State is a major leading partner in this program. K-State forester Larry Biles, also a main contributor in this project, explains more about what is planned for this proposal.

Track4  (:48)  Q…or species mix.
Biles explains geographically what areas will be assessed first for renovation.

Track5  (:37)  Q…for their property.
Water quality and quantity are both a main concern this program will look to improve.

Track6  (:36)  Q...get them established.

Tag:That was K-State forester Larry Biles, commenting on a major new riparian tree planting initiative soon to be launched in Kansas.
KANSAS TREE CONSERVATION
The Conservation Tree Planting Program out of K-State’s Kansas Forest Service is currently taking orders for new trees and shrubs for spring planting. K-State forester Leah Scott the coordinator of the program, stresses that this plant material is only for conservation use, such as windbreaks, woodlots or wildlife habitat. The Kansas Forest Service offers various species that can be purchased according to one’s growing environment.

Track7  (:42)  Q…red cedar for you.
When a producer places their order, they can expect to receive these either as bare-root bundles or as container-grown trees, depending on the species. When purchasing, shipping methods are flexible as well.

Track8  (:39)  Q...you through UPS.
Before a producer places an order, Scott highly suggests researching what tree or shrub would best fit their conservation purpose.

Track9  (:40)  Q…a part, so on.

Tag:That was K-State’s Leah Scott, the coordinator of the Conservation Tree Planting Program. To learn more about what is available for ordering, visit www.kansasforests.org.
WEED CONTROL GUIDE
That was K-State’s Leah Scott, the coordinator of the Conservation Tree Planting Program. To learn more about what is available for ordering, visit www.kansasforests.org.

Track10  (:29)  Q…of designing your program.
As usual, the guide categorizes herbicide choices by crop, which includes K-State field trial data on product efficacy.

Track11  (:41)  Q...might have in your field.
And again in response to the herbicide resistance issues, a new feature has been included in this year’s guide, according to Peterson.

Track12  (:38)  Q...different sites of action.

Tag:K-State weed management specialist Dallas Peterson there. The 2015 K-State Chemical Weed Control Guide is now available at local Extension offices, or can be found on line at www.ksre.ksu.edu.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
REDUCING POST-HARVEST LOSS
The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for the Reduction of Post-Harvest Loss at Kansas State University is a strategic and applied research and education program aimed at providing global leadership in food security by reducing post-harvest loss and food waste of durable staple crops This includes grains, oilseeds, legumes, root crops and seeds – and their processed value-added crops. Post-harvest losses represent food already in the production system that could have been used to reduce food insecurity and hunger and to increase food quality and safety, nutrition and market opportunities for small landholders. The lab at K-State is funded by an initial five-year, 8-point-5 million dollar grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development awarded in late 2013. Professor of agricultural education in Kansas State University’s College of Agriculture, Dr. Shannon Washburn, is working directly with smallholder farmers in Ghana and Ethiopia to reduce post-harvest loss on what are typically four to 10 acre farms

Track13  (:31)  Q...out into practice.

Tag:Post-harvest loss estimates are distressingly high considering the current and estimated future need for food. Post-harvest losses also have a big impact on the poor because a high percentage of their disposable income is used to buy staple foods.
IN THE DATA COLLECTING STAGE
Washburn says researchers with the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for the Reduction of Post-Harvest Loss have been spending a majority of the first two years collecting data in four developing countries: Ghana, Ethiopia, Bangladesh and Guatemala.

Track14  (:44)  Q...where we're working.
DEVELOPED VERSUS DEVELOPING
Washburn says there is a difference between post-harvest loss in developed countries and developing countries – like Ghana and Ethiopia.

Track15  (:44)  Q...developed countries.
OBSTACLES THE FARMERS FACE
Washburn says one of the biggest obstacles smallholder farmers in Ghana and Ethiopia face is finding affordable equipment for their relatively small farms.

Track16  (:40)  Q...they're storing grain.

Tag:In Ghana, researchers are targeting corn because it’s such a huge staple in that country. In Ethiopia, Washburn says researchers are targeting four different commodities: wheat, corn, sesame and chickpea.
ALREADY MAKING A DIFFERENCE
Although the project is only in its second year, Washburn says they are already making a difference by addressing one of the major health concerns caused by molds and soil borne organisms.

Track17  (:54)  Q...continue in the future.

Tag:Information on the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for the Reduction of Post-Harvest Loss is available at: www.reducephl.org. Information on Kansas State University’s Global Food Systems initiative can be found at: www.k-state.edu/globalfood. And, information on how you can reduce food waste is available at county or district Extension office or by visiting the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
CONSERVATION TREE USES
Recently, the Conservation Tree Planting Program at K-State announced that it is now accepting orders for spring delivery of conservation trees and shrubs. This is low-cost plant material, ideal for the intended purpose, says K-State horticulturist Ward Upham. But he is quick to stress that these seedlings are, by law, for conservation plantings only…although such plantings can serve to complement a home landscape.

Track18  (:43)  Q...the wildlife in your area.
TREES AND GRASS COMPETITION
Whether it be for conservation tree or landscape tree plantings this coming spring, one can do a little planting site preparation in the coming weeks. One important aspect of getting tree seedlings off to a good start is eliminating the grass competition from the planting site. Upham cites what K-State research says about this.

Track19  (:58)  Q...grass around those trees.
GRASS CONTROL HERBICIDE
In that completely ridding of grass growth on a tree planting site is recommended for new tree seedlings, there’s one common herbicide that will get the job done, says Upham. He also advises the use of a mulch to keep grass from coming back on that site.

Track20  (:44)  Q...about three inches deep.
WORKING UP TREE SOIL
Especially if one is planning on planting multiple tree seedlings on a given site, such as for a windbreak or woodlot, working up the soil in advance of planting is always a good idea. And when milder winter conditions permit would be a good time to do that, says Upham.

Track21  (:35)  Q...quickly after it's delivered.
LANDSCAPE TREE HOLE
In the case where a homeowner is planning on planting a “ball-and-burlap” landscape tree this coming spring, would it be a good idea to go ahead on a pleasant winter day and dig the hole for that tree? Upham says it might be best to wait until one actually has the ball-and-burlap tree on hand before digging. Here’s why.

Track22  (:46)  Q...get it ready early.
KANSAS PROFILE
BRET CHILCOTT – AG-EAGLE – PART TWO
Ron Wilson of K-State’s Huck Boyd Institute looks at a rural Kansan whose robotic aviation product is improving agricultural production from the sky.

Track23  (4:27)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
UDDER DIPPING PRODUCTS
Cold and damp winter conditions can quickly lead to problems with milk cow udders…which, in turn, can translate into higher somatic cell counts in the milk. Selecting the right pre-and-post milking udder dipping products can help prevent that from occurring. K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook) talks about some dip product alternatives to consider.

Track24  (2:00)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
FERAL CAT CONTROL
On last week’s edition, K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee reported on a study of feral cats as carriers of a disease which can afflict other wildlife, and potentially, humans who consume wild game. This week, Charlie takes a closer look at the overall problem of the ever-growing feral cat population, and the negative impacts other wildlife…and what can, and can’t, be done about it.

Track25  (5:00)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
REDUCING POST-HARVEST LOSS
The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for the Reduction of Post-harvest Loss at Kansas State University is a strategic and applied research and education program aimed at providing global leadership in food security by reducing post-harvest loss and food waste. Post-harvest loss estimates are distressingly high considering the current and estimated future need for food. These losses represent food already in the production system that could have been used to reduce food insecurity and hunger and to increase food quality and safety, nutrition and market opportunities for small landholders. The lab is funded by a five-year, 8-point-5 million dollar grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development. Professor of agricultural education in Kansas State University’s College of Agriculture, Dr. Shannon Washburn, is working directly with smallholder farmers in Ghana and Ethiopia to reduce post-harvest loss.

Track26  (14:51)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
WOODY SHRUB CLIPPINGS
Here’s an idea for adding a little plant color to your mid-winter. Taking clippings from woody flowering shrubs and “forcing” those clippings indoors can result in a colorful arrangement for Valentine’s Day or other suitable occasions…or just to brighten up the home as winter wears on. K-State forester Charlie Barden tells how.

Track27  (1:51)  Q…(theme music).
(same as 27 above, but without music bed)


Track28  (1:46)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
KANSAS WHEAT HISTORY
Kansas Day…the date on which Kansas achieved statehood back in 1861…is coming up soon. It’s an ideal occasion to reflect on the place that winter wheat production occupies in Kansas history, as covered by Nicole Lane on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (2:50)  Q…for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
KATABATIC WINDS
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp (nap) explains the differences in winds that travel downhill.

Track30  (:59)  Q…Research and Extension.
FROST-LINE
The temperature at which the ground will freeze is important information, according to K-State climatologist Mary Knapp.

Track31  (:57)  Q…Research and Extension.
DRY JANUARY
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp looks back at past Kansas winters which were unusually dry.

Track32  (1:26)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
THE EVOLUTION OF PUNISHMENT
Have you ever wondered about the punishments handed down in criminal trials…are they too severe or not severe enough…who really gets punished and why…and does incarcerating those convicted of a crime really do any good? According to the International Center for Prison Studies, the United States incarcerates more people than any other country in the world, by some estimates we have over two-and-a-quarter million people behind bars. According to one author and trial judge, if you spend a good portion of your life sending people to prison, you cannot help but begin to ponder right and wrong…human nature…why we punish and why we forgive. The guest is Morris Hoffman, author of The Punisher’s Brain: The Evolution of Judge and Jury.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.