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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   10/31/2014...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
SUNFLOWER SUPREME PROGRAM


Track1  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
BEEF GRAZING PROJECT


Track2  (3:02)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
CROP SOIL TESTING


Track3  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
SUNFLOWER SUPREME PROGRAM
K-State beef systems specialist Jaymelynn (Jaime-lynn) Farney is the director of a special heifer development program, called the Sunflower Supreme program for cattle producers to consider in the state of Kansas. The response during its first year of operation in southeast Kansas has been impressive. Enrollment in the program began a year ago, and it’s based on several beef heifer management guidelines. Farney explains more about those requirements.

Track4  (:49)  Q…entire productive career.
Pre-breeding requirements are among those management guidelines for qualified heifers.

Track5  (:40)   Q…our genetic pool.
Farney explains that one of the most important guidelines in this program is to incorporate calving ease sires.

Track6  (:35)   Q...selection standpoint.

Tag:That was K-State’s Jaymelynn Farney talking about the Sunflower Supreme Heifer Development Program, which is now being offered statewide to Kansas cattle producers. For more information, go to www.sunflowersupreme.org.
BEEF GRAZING PROJECT
The U.S. Department of Agriculture provided a 9.6-million-dollar, five-year grant to a multistate partnership, led by Kansas State University, in cooperation with several other institutions. Recently, this project has finished its first year of research into grazing systems as they relate to climate change. K-State agronomist Dan Devlin, who is leading the project, provides this update. He says the research site is located in Oklahoma, which has similar features compared to the Kansas grasslands.

Track7  (:32)   Q…the same animals.
Devlin says the first year of research spent on this project has been completed. One of the objectives of this project is to measure greenhouse gases that result from cattle grazing activity.

Track8  (:42)  Q...that's really exciting.
Researchers are beginning to collect data from each cow to determine the methane emissions.

Track9  (:46)  Q…in methane emissions.

Tag:That was K-State’s Dan Devlin, with a progress report on a large-scale beef systems grazing study being funded by the U-S-D-A.
CROP SOIL TESTING
With the row crop harvest wrapping up, now is an excellent time to draw soil samples from the fields for nutrient analysis. This will provide a baseline for making nutrient management decisions for next year. K-State nutrient management specialist Dorivar Ruiz-Diaz (DOOR-ah-var roo-EEZ DEE-az) endorses the idea of soil testing post-harvest in the fall, as opposed to waiting until the spring, for the following reasons.

Track10  (:41)  Q…during the year.
And the first thing to do is identify the areas of a given field to be sampled, based on whatever criteria one deems fit.

Track11  (:42)  Q...in terms of nutrient application.
As for how many soil cores need to be pulled for an adequate composite sample to be turned in to the laboratory, Ruiz-Diaz offers this research-based recommendation.

Track12  (:29)  Q...expect in your fields.

Tag:Consult your local Extension agricultural agent for further guidance on conducting a soil test in the fall. That’s K-State nutrient management specialist Dorivar Ruiz-Diaz.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
GETTING PREPARED FOR WINTER
There is often a wide gap between when winter weather arrives and when winter officially begins. Winter doesn’t officially start until December 21st, but you better be prepared for it much sooner. Kansas State University climatologist Mary Knapp (nap) says two winter terms you want to be familiar with are winter storm watch and winter storm warning.

Track13  (:28)  Q...in our area.
A WINTER STORM OR A BLIZZARD?
Knapp explains the difference between a winter storm warning and a blizzard.

Track14  (:56)  Q...extremely hazardous.
HARD TO PREDICT SNOW TOTALS
We’ve all experienced a forecast that calls for far less or much more than we actually received. Knapp says that while it’s relatively easy to track the path of a winter storm, it’s not as easy to predict how much snow a certain area will receive or how icy roads may become.

Track15  (:45)  Q...changing conditions.
IS IT A WET ROAD OR BLACK ICE?
Knapp says one of the most dangerous situations for drivers is when black ice forms.

Track16  (:25)  Q...surface conditions.
ASSEMBLE A WINTER WEATHER KIT
Regardless of whether you’re traveling across town or across the state, having a winter weather kit in your vehicle increases your chances of being able to handle almost any winter weather emergency. Knapp offers some suggestions on what to put into your winter weather kit.

Track17  (1:02)  Q...layer of protection.

Tag:More information on winter weather safety is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu. Additional information can also be found online through Kansas State University’s Weather Data Library: www.ksre.ksu.edu/wdl.
LAWN AND GARDEN
LAWN WEED CONTROL
The late fall is a great time to put a big dent in broadleaf weed invasions in the home lawn. So notes a K-State turfgrass specialist, who says that common weeds like dandelions are vulnerable to herbicide treatments now, because the product will go right to the roots for a cleaner kill. Jared Hoyle talks more about why this is a good approach.

Track18  (1:04)  Q...perennials like dandelions.
BROADLEAF WEED HERBICIDES
Dandelions aren’t the only broadleaf weeds that turn up in home lawns in the fall. Henbit and chickweed, among others, also make an appearance, and are also candidates for a herbicide treatment. Hoyle advises selecting a herbicide that will cover all the bases.

Track19  (:41)  Q...here in the fall.
WEED TREATMENT TIMING
At what point does the homeowner want to treat those broadleaf weeds in their lawn here in the fall? Instead of waiting for all to emerge at once, which likely won’t happen, Hoyle recommends going ahead and applying herbicide right away.

Track20  (:49)  Q...it'll slow that encroachment.
LIQUID VS. GRANULAR HERBICIDE
Homeowners can choose either a liquid or a granular herbicide product for fall treatment of broadleaf weeds in the lawn. Either will do the job, says Hoyle. He notes that the granular product needs to be watered in following application, either by rainfall or by sprinkler.

Track21  (:41)  Q...within 24 hours.
MULCHING LAWN LEAVES
The leaves have fallen, and are now scattered across the lawn. Instead of going to all the work of raking those up and bagging them, one might just use those as a nutritional mulch for the lawn. Making a pass or two with the mower will make that happen, says Hoyle, and there’s no adverse impact at all on the grass.

Track22  (1:12)  Q...as you're going.
KANSAS PROFILE
JONATHAN TRUMAN – WESTON HIEBERT
Ron Wilson of K-State’s Huck Boyd Institute for Rural Development profiles two small-town athletes who are providing leadership to the K-State football team.

Track23  (4:26)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
FLUID MILK SALES
While not providing the lion’s share of returns to dairy production, fluid milk sales are nonetheless important to the dairy industry. Recent numbers indicate that the decline in fluid milk consumption continues, although there’s a notable exception to that trend that the industry should be paying attention to, according to K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook).

Track24  (2:01)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
BATS AND EBOLA
The ebola crisis in Africa has the world’s full attention…and there is a wildlife link to the story, in that bats actively transmit the ebola virus in the African wild. K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee talks this week about the role bats play in the movement of ebola, stressing that the chances of bats transmitting the disease in the U.S. are virtually nil.

Track25  (5:00)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
PREPARING FOR WINTER TRAVEL
There is often a wide gap between when winter weather arrives and when winter officially begins. Winter officially starts on December 21st, but you better be prepared for it much sooner – especially if you’re traveling. Kansas State University climatologist Mary Knapp says a large part of being prepared for winter travel is paying attention to the current weather conditions and the forecast for the days you’ll be traveling. She also encourages you to assemble a winter weather kit and keep it in your vehicle.

Track26  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
RIPARIAN FOREST PROTECTION
Streams and rivers in Kansas were once lined with forested areas. However, over time, those riparian areas have given way to other uses. That prompts K-State riparian forester Mitch Lundeen to remind landowners of the value of riparian forests, which is manifested in several ways. Further, he encourages landowners to take the initiative to restore and preserve those tree resources.

Track27  (2:01)  Q…(theme music).
(same as above, but without music)


Track28  (1:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
PROMOTING WHEAT FOODS
Consumers’ rising interest in their food supply is also a grand opportunity for the wheat industry to put its best foot forward, using all forms of media to tell about wheat-based foods. Marsha Boswell has more in this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (3:05)  Q…for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
WINTER WEATHER ISSUES
WINTER WEATHER ISSUES – K-State climatologist Mary Knapp explains how Kansas weather can change rapidly.

Track30  (:56)  Q…Research and Extension.
STORM TRACKS
Benjamin Franklin helped identify coastal storm patterns, according to state climatologist Mary Knapp.

Track31  (:43)  Q…Research and Extension.
WINTER WEATHER KIT
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp notes what items you should have in your car in case of a winter weather emergency.

Track32  (1:06)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
THE FRACKING CONTROVERSY
Hydraulic fracturing, hydro-fracturing, hydro-fracking, or just plain old fracking is under ever-increasing scrutiny and criticism. According to estimates, some two-and-a-half million fracking operations had been undertaken around the world as of about two years ago, with some saying about a million of those had been done in the United States. The guest is Susan Brantley, distinguished professor of geosciences in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences at Pennsylvania State University. She also is director of the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute, and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2012.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.