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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   04/17/2015...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
FUTURE LIVESTOCK ANTIBIOTICS


Track1  (3:01)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION PREPARATION


Track2  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
SWINE ANTIBIOTIC PRODUCTION


Track3  (3:01)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
FUTURE LIVESTOCK ANTIBIOTICS
An important and current topic to the livestock industry is the future use of antibiotics as a health management tool in livestock production. K-State veterinarian Mike Apley (APP-lee) approaches this issue with recent research concerning antibiotics in livestock. He says there is a concern with the latest statements from the White House on antibiotic resistance as a human health issue, where animal agriculture was targeted as a contributor.

Track4  (:46)  Q…in agriculture today.
Apley says there are genuine concerns among producers about the future availability of antibiotics for treatment and prevention of disease in livestock.

Track5  (:38)  Q...our big focus.
One thing is for certain, says Apley: in the near future, producers who wish to administer antibiotics to their livestock through feed or water will have to get clearance first from their veterinarian.

Track6  (:38)  Q...for water use.

Tag:That was K-State’s Mike Apley talking about one of the most current important issues in the livestock industry, the future allowance of antibiotics for livestock health.
ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION PREPARATION
The spring beef breeding season is arriving for cow-calf producers. K-State livestock specialist Sandy Johnson offers simple guidelines in using the artificial insemination (A-I) program, and especially, managing the synchronization component within it. Even though A-I may be a time-consuming process, the advantages are well worth the effort. Johnson talks about what cow herd characteristics favor using A-I.

Track7  (:39)  Q…an A-I program.
Johnson offers these suggestions, and necessities, in conducting a successful synchronization program.

Track8  (:34)  Q...close to cycling.
She encourages producers to make use of a free, on-line estrus synchronization planner for achieving their A-I breeding goals.

Track9  (:42)  Q…work for you.

Tag:That was K-State’s Sandy Johnson providing guidelines on successfully using synchronization in beef cattle reproduction.
SWINE ANTIBIOTIC PRODUCTION
Antibiotic resistance in human health is being studied in connection of antibiotic use in swine production. K-State swine nutritionist Mike Tokach (TOE-cash) outlines the recent announcement from the Obama administration concerning its antibiotics initiative and the response of the pork industry. The White House has decided to contribute financial support for continued research into antimicrobial resistance. In swine production, antibiotics are used positively as a health and growth tool.

Track10  (:52)  Q…in human health.
Tokach points out that, in recent years, pork producers have concentrated on improved herd health management overall, which has lessened the need for antibiotic use.

Track11  (:29)  Q...we use antibiotics.
So when looking to the future, Tokach believes that the pork industry is well positioned to adapt to any changes in antibiotic availability.

Track12  (:38)  Q...of years now.

Tag:That was K-State’s Mike Tokach giving a brief overview of the future use of antibiotic use in the swine industry.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
DEVELOP HEALTHY EATING HABITS
Research shows that a healthy diet promotes success in life – better concentration and alertness, better physical health that translates into good mental and emotional health. Good eating habits are also a front line defense against obesity, which happens when a child eats more calories than they burn. In the United States, nearly 1 in 4 children between the ages of 2 and 5 Is overweight or obese – making them at risk for developing diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma and sleep apnea. K-State Research and Extension nutrition specialist Sandy Procter says children have an innate ability to know when they’re hungry and when they’re full.

Track13  (:20)  Q...not ready, right now.
AN UNHEALTHY FOOD RELATIONSHIP
Associate professor in human nutrition and Extension specialist at Kansas State University, Tanda (tahn-duh) Kidd, cautions against using food as a reward or a punishment because it can create a negative association with food.

Track14  (:39)  Q...academically, as well.
WHAT SHOULD CHILDREN BE EATING
So, what should children be eating? Procter says the guidelines for children are essentially the same as for adults – just on a smaller scale.

Track15  (:20)  Q...a dairy serving.
HAVE HEALTHY SNACKS IN THE HOUSE
Snacks are also an important part of a healthy diet. Kidd says it’s a fact that snacks are going to happen and that parents should be providing a variety of healthy options.

Track16  (:49)  Q...things like that.
TEENAGERS NEED ADDITIONAL CALCIUM
Calcium is a nutrient that’s short in almost every young child through teenager. Having a lot of low fat milk, yogurt and cheeses in the refrigerator is a great way to increase the amount of calcium in your child’s daily diet. Procter thinks it’s important to introduce dairy foods in the diet as soon as possible.

Track17  (:32)  Q...set ‘em up right.

Tag:More information on healthy eating is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: http://www.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
EARLY TOMATO PLANTING
Normally, gardeners in this region don’t plant their tomato transplants this early in the season. However, with the use of a few tricks, one can put their tomatoes in now, according to a K-State horticulturist. As Ward Upham explains, tomatoes are very sensitive to cold soil temperatures. But he says those can be managed with the use of plastic mulch.

Track18  (1:03)  Q...to bear that fruit load.
APPLYING TOMATO MULCH
Applying plastic mulch to early-planted tomatoes is a relatively simple process, if one pays attention to several details, says Upham. Here are the steps to follow.

Track19  (:42)  Q...you figure about six degrees.
MEASURING SOIL TEMPERATURE
In that tomato transplants fare poorly when soil temperatures are too cold, it’s important for gardeners to get an accurate reading of those temperatures. Upham stresses that merely a one-shot reading won’t do…one should measure the average soil daily soil temperature.

Track20  (:47)  Q...off to a good start.
TOMATO STARTER FERTILIZER
If a gardener chooses to plant tomato transplants early, using a starter fertilizer with that transplant is important, says Upham. Cool soils tend to limit the availability of phosphorus to the plant, so a fertilizer high in phosphorus content will be of great benefit.

Track21  (:38)  Q... getting enough phosphorous.
TOMATO TEMPERATURE PROTECTION
Of course, tomatoes are highly sensitive to cold air temperature. So if one is planting tomatoes in April, one needs to provide their transplants with sufficient protection from the cold, and perhaps, the wind as well. Upham talks about some means of accomplishing that.

Track22  (1:08)  Q...if there’s a heavy wind.
KANSAS PROFILE
JENNY RUSSELL – JENRUS FREELANCE
Ron Wilson of K-State’s Huck Boyd Institute looks at how high-speed internet service is making a difference for one rural entrepreneur.

Track23  (4:14)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
DAIRY EXPORT UPSWING
In recent years, there’s been a noticeable increase in dairy export business out of the U.S. As K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook) sees it, those export sales have been pivotal in keeping milk prices afloat. Furthermore, he urges dairy producers to keep those export markets well in mind as they go about their management.

Track24  (2:00)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
SUPPLEMENTAL WILDLIFE FEEDING
Providing a supplemental feed resource to wildlife has its pros and cons when it comes to the prevalence of disease in those species. And that’s important to understand before one actually starts feeding wildlife. This week, K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee takes a closer look at this issue.

Track25  (5:00)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
DEVELOP HEALTHY EATING HABITS
Research shows that a healthy diet promotes success in life – better concentration and alertness, better physical health that translates into good mental and emotional health. Good eating habits are also a front line defense against obesity, which happens when a child eats more calories than they burn. In the United States, nearly 1 in 4 children between the ages of 2 and 5 Is overweight or obese – making them at risk for developing diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma and sleep apnea. According to two Kansas State University nutrition specialists, teaching a child to make healthy food choices early in life is a key component to better health.

Track26  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
CROP WINDBREAK STUDY
Research from years past indicated that windbreaks that protect crop fields not only curb soil erosion…they can actually enhance crop yields. K-State forester Charlie Barden intends to update that research via a new regional project, and he’s looking for farmers who would like to take part. He talks more about the objective of this new study.

Track27  (1:57)  Q…(theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)


Track28  (1:58)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
WHEAT YIELD CONTEST
Entry forms are being accepted now for the 2015 Kansas Wheat Yield Contest conducted by Kansas Wheat. Marsha Boswell has all the details on this opportunity for wheat growers on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (2:59)  Q...I'm Marsha Boswell.
WEATHER WONDERS
LAST FREEZE
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp (nap) reminds us that a few days of warm weather doesn’t mean freezing temperatures are over.

Track30  (1:04)  Q…Research and Extension.
HEAT INDEX
Temperature and humidity are used to calculate what is called a “heat index,” as K-State climatologist Mary Knapp explains.

Track31  (1:04)  Q…Research and Extension.
LONGER DAYS, STRONGER STORMS
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp says that spring conditions increase the chance of severe weather.

Track32  (:50)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
SEXUAL ASSAULT ON COLLEGE CAMPUS
According to a report put out in January of last year by the White house Council on Women and Girls and the Office of the U.S. Vice President, nearly 22-million women have been raped in their lifetimes…that’s nearly one in five. And these are not stranger rapes, most of these women know their assailants. In addition, over a third of women were also raped as minors. In looking at the statistics concerning rape, of particular concern is sexual assault on college campuses. The dynamics of college life seem to fuel the problem, but it is further exacerbated by the fact that many campus assailants are serial offenders. Guest: David Lisak (LEE-sak), a nationally recognized forensic consultant, trainer and lecturer. His research and applied forensic work on non-stranger rapists has helped guide rape prevention and response policies in major institutions, including the U.S. Armed Services and numerous colleges and universities.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.