K-State home » K-State Research and Extension »  News  » Radio Network » Weekly Features
K-State Research and Extension News

K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   09/12/2014...


(Audiofiles are 44.1khz/mono/48kbps.)
Download problems? E-mail us or call us at 785-532-5851
AGRICULTURE FEATURES
FALL ALFALFA SEEDING


Track1  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
70 YEARS OF SMOKEY BEAR


Track2  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
LIME VS. GYPSUM


Track3  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
FALL ALFALFA SEEDING
Fall is an ideal time for planting a new alfalfa stand, or renovating an existing stand. K-State crops and soils specialist Doug Shoup (Shoop) says that in most cases, planting alfalfa in a fine-textured seedbed is best. At the same time, he advises that producers not be too aggressive in working that seedbed prior to planting. He also comments on planting alfalfa in no-till conditions.

Track4  (:40)  Q…success with that.
Variety selection may also make a big difference in alfalfa performance. Shoup says disease tolerance is key in producing a healthy alfalfa crop.

Track5  (:43)  Q...one in Hutchinson.
K-State yield data provides helpful information to producers who are in the process of determining a variety best suited for them.

Track6  (:33)  Q...make that decision.

Tag:That was K-State’s Doug Shoup, with advice to alfalfa producers who are planning on planting alfalfa in the weeks ahead.
70 YEARS OF SMOKEY BEAR
This year marks the 70th anniversary of the Smokey Bear campaign to spread awareness concerning wildfire prevention. From the Kansas Forest Service at Kansas State University, fire protection specialist Jason Hartman has been a part of the celebrations around the state. Hartman tells about the original reasons for creating the highly-popular public information figure.

Track7  (:46)  Q…horse lands, primarily.
Hartman explains how the original Smokey Bear was created, a character who then was accompanied with a song.

Track8  (:45)  Q...is Smokey Bear.
Even though Smokey Bear was created 70 years ago, the main message is still clearly represented today.

Track9  (:32)  Q…accidental fire causes.

Tag:That was K-State fire protection specialist Jason Hartman, speaking about the well-known public figure, Smokey Bear, who has maintained a fire safety reputation for 70 years.
LIME VS. GYPSUM
Of late, there’s been quite a bit of publicity about a soil amendment compound and what it can accomplish…that being gypsum…a by-product of coal-fired electricity. A K-State soil management specialist says that several farmers have been asking about gypsum, and whether it can serve as a substitute for a lime application to crop fields. DeAnn Presley talks more about this growing interest in gypsum for crop production purposes.

Track10  (:32)  Q…is calcium carbonate.
And it’s important, says Presley, to understand that key difference in the chemical make-up of lime and gypsum

Track11  (:29)  Q...it neutralized acidity.
Gypsum, however, can’t be interchanged with lime for improving acidic soils.

Track12  (:50)  Q...change a sodic soil.

Tag:On the difference between lime and gypsum as crop soil additives, that’s soil management specialist DeAnn Presley of K-State Research and Extension.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
IDENTIFYING ADOLESCENT HEALTH NEEDS
K-State Research and Extension is conducting a survey to identify adolescent health needs and what can be done to address those needs. If you live in Kansas and are over the age of 13, you’re eligible to participate in the online survey. However, the deadline for completing the survey is September 19th. K-State Research and Extension youth development specialist Elaine Johannes (joe-han-us) says the Kansas Adolescent Health Community Input Survey will serve as another resource in helping the state prioritize the use of federal grant dollars to address adolescent health concerns.

Track13  (:55)  Q...to express themselves.

Tag:Johannes says the federal government uses criteria from the World Health Organization that defines an adolescent as someone between the age of 10 and 25 – which typically aligns with the onset of puberty and when a brain is fully developed.
RISK FACTORS AND PROTECTIVE FACTORS
In addition to collecting information on how people protect their health, Johannes says the survey also tries to identify potential risk factors.

Track14  (:52)  Q...protect their health.
IDENTIFYING "HOT SPOTS" ACROSS KANSAS
Once the survey closes, the next phase is to look at the results. Johannes says the results – based upon the responses and risk factors that bubble to the top – help them identify the “hot spots” in the state.

Track15  (:26)  Q...ideas from community.
COMMUNITY FORUMS AND THE FINAL REPORT
The community forums will be held in late September and October – typically in the evening or on weekends to give adolescents a better opportunity to participate. Johannes says the final report will be ready for the Department of health and Environment by November 1st.

Track16  (:44)  Q...that our state receives.
HOW WILL THE STATE USE THE SURVEY DATA?
Data from surveys that have already been completed shows that substance abuse, mental health and reproductive and sexual health are the top adolescent health concerns. In addition to gathering vital information regarding adolescent health concerns, Johannes says this survey benefits state government and the people of Kansas in a variety of ways.

Track17  (1:05)  Q...benefit the whole state.

Tag:The best way to access the online survey is to type “kansas adolescent health community input survey” into your search engine. The link to the survey will appear as one of the top search results. More information on adolescent health needs is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
HARVESTING WINTER SQUASH
There’s a difference between harvesting squash for consumption in the summer, and harvesting squash to be stored into the winter. That’s according to K-State horticulturist Ward Upham, who points out that harvesting winter squash before they mature will seriously limit their ability to store well. He offers the following guidelines on determining squash ripeness

Track18  (1:05)  Q...it's going to rot.
STORING WINTER SQUASH
Depending on the variety, winter squash can be stored successfully for a fair amount of time, as long as they’re stored in the proper conditions. Upham outlines what’s required in temperature and humidity.

Track19  (:37)  Q...temperatures, but not hot.
DIGGING SWEET POTATOES
Gardeners with sweet potatoes in the ground should be at the ready to harvest those soon. Upham urges growers to dig those sweet potatoes in a timely fashion, and to not let them get too large.

Track20  (:29)  Q...time to harvest 'em.
CURING SWEET POTATOES
To get the maximum “sweet” out of just-harvested sweet potatoes, the curing process is all-important, says Upham. In essence, that means providing a warm and humid environment right away. And storing sweet potatoes requires something of the same.

Track21  (1:00)  Q...they'll store fine.
EATING HOME CRABAPPLES
Upham gets questions from homeowners every September about whether it’s safe to eat the fruit from their landscape crabapple trees. In virtually all cases, the answer is yes. However, he says to be sure that the crabapple is ripe first.

Track22  (:37)  Q...they'll be good to eat.
KANSAS PROFILE
SHEVY SMITH – EMMY NOMINEE
Ron Wilson of the Huck Boyd Institute at K-State profiles a successful singer-songwriter from rural Kansas.

Track23  (4:25)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
EVENLY MIXED RATIONS
Many dairies utilize total mixed rations, or T-M-Rs, as their herd nutrition approach of choice. Research has shown that often, those rations are mixed unevenly, resulting in uneven nutritional distribution throughout the herd. And, as K-State diary specialist Mike Brouk (Brook) outlines this week, corn silage is frequently at the root of that problem.

Track24  (2:01)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
DEER MINERAL FEEDING
In anticipation of the deer hunting season, landowners and hunters often set out mineral supplements in the hunting area…the idea being that those supplements will lead to improved antler development, and therefore, a greater likelihood of harvesting a trophy buck. However, the science doesn’t support that strategy, according to K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee…he discusses that this week.

Track25  (5:00)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
IDENTIFYING ADOLESCENT HEALTH NEEDS
K-State Research and Extension is conducting a survey to identify adolescent health needs and what can be done to address those needs. If you live in Kansas and are over the age of 13, you’re eligible to participate in the online survey. However, the deadline for completing the survey is September 19th. K-State Research and Extension youth development specialist Elaine Johannes and Kansas Adolescent Health Community Input Survey project manager, Bryant Miller, a graduate student in the K-State School of Family Studies and Human Services, discuss how the information being gathered can be used to improve adolescent health in Kansas.

Track26  (14:52)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
PROTECTING RIPARIAN AREAS
Shoring up areas around reservoirs and streams with conservation trees remains a major cause of the Kansas Forest Service at Kansas State University. Numerous projects are underway, in cooperation with landowners, to renovate and stabilize such riparian areas. This week, forester Bob Atchison of K-State talks about the significance of that initiative.

Track27  (2:00)  Q…theme music).
(same as above, but without music)


Track28  (1:52)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
WHEAT CONTEST WINNERS –
On September 11, Kansas Wheat honored the winners of the Wheat Yield Contest and the Wheat Quality Initiative Contest. This year's top wheat yield belongs to Chuck Downey of St. Francis, Western Region winner, with a yield of 88.56 bushels per acre. Other regional winners are Butch Harris of Soldier and Levi Felbush of Abilene, Eastern Region winners; and Doug Keas of Plainville, Central Region winner. The top quality award, announced on September 11 by Governor Sam Brownback, was also awarded to Doug Keas.

Track29  (3:06)  Q…for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
WHAT IS A “FAIR” SKY?
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp defines what makes a sky “fair” rather than simply partly cloudy.

Track30  (:48)  Q…Research and Extension.
FROST DATES
When are the first freezes due to hit Kansas? Mary Knapp of K-State looks at when frost typically first appears in Kansas.

Track31  (1:06)  Q…Research and Extension.
AUTUMNAL EQUINOX
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp explains that the equinox is not necessarily when the day and night are of equal length.

Track32  (:56)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
THE IMPACT OF MONEY ON DEMOCRACY
If one is to believe the latest numbers it takes about a billion dollars to get elected president of the United States. It only takes about 10-million dollars if you wish to be a U.S. senator…and the price drops to around a million dollars to become a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. This stems from the fact that a small elite groups of donors…super PACs…and corporations are now the power brokers in American politics. One author and law professor feels this change will affect both our democracy and our system of capitalism. (Guest: Timothy Kuhner, author of Capitalism v. Democracy: Money in Politics and the Free Market Constitution. Professor at Georgia State University College of Law)

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.