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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   08/22/2014...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
ALFALFA SUBSURFACE IRRIGATION


Track1  (3:01)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
PASTURE LEASE SURVEY


Track2  (3:01)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
NEW K-STATE WHEAT VARIETY


Track3  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
ALFALFA SUBSURFACE IRRIGATION
Alfalfa producers have developed an interest in subsurface drip irrigation on their croplands. K-State agronomy started a research project, featuring SDU demonstrations on actual alfalfa farm ground. In the study, irrigation drip line spacing and depth were analyzed for their effect on stand performance. K-State agricultural engineer Danny Rogers was a leading researcher in this study, and shares more about the results.

Track4  (:40)  Q…study on that.
One difficulty that is associated with sprinkler irrigation is the ability to adequately water alfalfa, and still allow for dry field surface for harvest. Using SDI, it allows producers to cut alfalfa and continue irrigating at the same time.

Track5  (:47)  Q…that standpoint.
Another benefit of an SDI system is, by maintaining a dry soil surface, is a reduction in weed germination.

Track6  (:25)  Q…to those conditions.

Tag:That was K-State’s Danny Rogers explaining some of the benefits of watering alfalfa crops with a subsurface drip irrigation system, as compared to sprinkler irrigation.
PASTURE LEASE SURVEY
Kansas State University’s Department of Agricultural Economics recently hosted the annual Risk and Profit Conference. One of the speakers there, K-State agricultural economist Robin Reid, was involved in coordinating a survey of cattle producers in nine north-central Kansas counties, attempting to identify current trends in pasture rental rates. Reid presented information regarding rental trends and what may control trends in different areas.

Track7  (:51)  Q…markets are doing.
Other than rental rates, Reid’s survey asked about pasture stocking rates and what factors determine those.

Track8  (:30)  Q…cow calf pair.
Another aspect of the survey indicated that cattle producers hope to stay with their current stocking rates over the next few years, as opposed to increasing or decreasing those rates.

Track9  (:33)  Q…those decreased rates.

Tag:That was K-State’s Robin Reid, who helped coordinate a survey on pasture leasing arrangements in north-central Kansas. The entire results, as presented at the Risk and Profit Conference, can be found at www.agmanager.info.
NEW K-STATE WHEAT VARIETY
The wheat breeding program at Kansas State University has just released its latest winter wheat variety for Kansas growers. It goes by the name of KanMark, in honor of one of K-State’s early pioneers in wheat genetics work. And it has more than held its own in K-State’s field trials. K-State wheat breeder Allan Fritz talks about the attributes of KanMark, which is especially well adapted for central and western Kansas.

Track10  (:52)  Q…terribly concerned about.
This new variety has really shown its wares as an experimental line in K-State’s performance tests over the last three years. Fritz is really impressed with its consistently sound in-field performance.

Track11  (:35)  Q…potential has been there.
KanMark is now in the seed volume development stage…it will be openly available to Kansas wheat growers for planting a year from now.

Track12  (:10)  Q…fall of 2015.

Tag:To see more about the field trial results for KanMark and many other winter wheat varieties, check out the 2014 Kansas Wheat Variety Performance Test report, available through your local Extension office or on line at www.agronomy.ksu.edu. That’s K-State wheat breeder Allan Fritz.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
MAKING SAFE SACK LUNCHES
Whether it’s convenience, to save money or to eat healthier, millions of Americans carry their lunch to school and work. However, if proper food safety precautions aren’t followed, that sack lunch could make them sick. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service, food brought from home can be kept safe if it’s first handled and cooked properly and then kept out of what’s referred to as the “danger zone” – the temperature between 40 and 140 degrees Fahrenheit where harmful bacteria multiply rapidly. K-State Research and Extension food scientist Karen Blakeslee says most sandwiches, with the exception of peanut butter and jelly, should be kept cold.

Track13  (:42)  Q…do that just fine.

Tag:To keep cold foods below 40 degrees, add a couple of ice packs to an insulated lunch bag. If you’re taking soup, it should be put in a thermos so the temperature remains above 140 degrees.
CONTAINERS HELP ORGANIZE
Blakeslee says there are a number of options for keeping food protected and separated inside a lunch bag.

Track14  (:54)  Q…really kept cold.

Tag:Blakeslee also suggests having a back-up lunch bag, containers and ice packs for those times when the regular lunch bag gets left at school or work.
EAT YOUR FOOD, DON'T TRADE
While it’s natural for children to want to trade some of their food for food in someone else’s lunch, Blakeslee says that can be extremely dangerous.

Track15  (:32)  Q…careful about that.
DON'T SAVE FOOD FOR LATER
Because so many factors determine how long food remains hot or cold inside an insulated bag, Blakeslee says it’s safer to discard the food that doesn’t get eaten at lunch.

Track16  (:29)  Q…to keep 'em cold.
PACK FOOD FROM ALL GROUPS
To make sure your child is getting a healthy lunch, Blakeslee suggests following the MyPlate recommendations – which calls for smaller protein portions and more fruits, vegetables and whole grains.

Track17  (:59)  Q…just might like it.

Tag:More information on food safety, health and nutrition is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
TREE LEAF AFFLICTIONS
We’re now starting the transition from summer to fall conditions. Homeowners may be noticing discoloration of leaves on their landscape deciduous trees. And their first thought might be that a disease is at work. That may or may not be, according to K-State horticultural disease specialist Megan (MEE-gan) Kennelly…but she says that homeowners shouldn’t worry much about it.

Track18  (:37)  Q…need to worry about.
LEAF DROP CLEAN-UP
Kennelly adds that there might even be some pre-mature leaf drop from landscape hardwoods during this late-summer stretch. Again, it shouldn’t be much of a concern, other than one wants to definitely clean up that leaf litter at some point, so that diseases don’t overwinter near the tree.

Track19  (:44)  Q…disease pressure next year.
PINE NEEDLE DROP
Also around this time of the year, landscape pines may feature browning needles and a certain amount of needle drop. By and large, this is not of concern, says Kennelly…it’s a natural needle loss process, unless the tree abruptly loses all its needles, which would mean that pine wilt disease has set in.

Track20  (1:09)  Q…worth of green needle.
LATE SUMMER TREE WATERING
As temperatures cool down during the changeover from summer to fall, trees are much less stressed by hot-weather evapotranspiration. Nonetheless, Kennelly advises homeowners to assure that trees are adequately watered, especially those that were put in this year.

Track21  (:34)  Q…drip line of that tree.
LAWN FERTILIZER MANAGEMENT
Some late-summer afflictions in home lawns aren’t the result of disease problems. Rather, inappropriate fertility management could be at the root of the issue. Kennelly reminds homeowners about proper lawn fertilization moving into the fall.

Track22  (:55)  Q…for more information.
KANSAS PROFILE
ROGER HUBERT - BARN YARNS
Ron Wilson of the Huck Boyd Institute for Rural Development takes another look at Roger Hubert and his work to preserve the state’s historic barns.

Track23  (5:00)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
AUTOMATED CALF FEEDERS
K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk is receiving quite a few inquiries now about automated dairy calf feeding systems. And with good reason, says Mike…these systems definitely save labor, and are beneficial in a variety of other ways. But they also require a certain level of management…all of which Mike covers this week.

Track24  (2:00)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
NORTHER LONG-EARED BAT
It’s rarely seen in Kansas, but historical records show that the northern long-eared bat does, in fact, reside in the eastern half of Kansas. That’s noteworthy, says K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee, for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has just proposed that this bat be listed as an endangered species. This week, Charlie takes a closer look at that development.

Track25  (5:00)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
A SAFE AND HEALTHY SACK LUNCH
Whether it’s convenience, to save money or eat healthier, millions of Americans carry their lunch to school and work. However, if proper food safety precautions aren’t followed, that sack lunch could make them sick. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service, food brought from home can be kept safe if it’s first handled and cooked properly and then kept out of what’s referred to as the “danger zone” – the temperature between 40 and 140 degrees Fahrenheit where harmful bacteria multiply rapidly. K-State Research and Extension food scientist Karen Blakeslee says making sack lunches safe and healthy isn’t difficult, it just requires planning.

Track26  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
ALLEY CROPPING DEMONSTRATION
A marriage of conservation forestry and hay crop production will be on full display at the 2014 Fall Forestry Field Day to be hosted by the Kansas Forest Service on October 16th. The location will be near Valley Falls in northeast Kansas, and as K-State forester Charlie Barden outlines here, the field day will be a terrific learning opportunity for landowners.

Track27  (1:59)  Q…theme music).
(same as above, but without music)


Track28  (1:56)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
PHILLIPINE WHEAT BUYERS
Recently, Kansas Wheat welcomed five milling industry customers from The Phillipines, one of the largest outlets in the world for U.S. wheat exports, to Kansas…to see and learn about winter wheat production first hand. Marsha Boswell recaps their visit, and what was gained from it, on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (3:15)  Q…for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
WATER VAPOR
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp explains the important role that water vapor plays above Earth.

Track30  (1:05)  Q…Research and Extension.
THE VOLCANO FELT 'ROUND THE WORLD
K-State’s Mary Knapp examines one of the most important volcanic eruptions in recorded history.

Track31  (1:26)  Q…Research and Extension.
KATRINA ANNIVERSARY
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp looks back at one of the deadliest U.S. hurricanes of the last 100 years.

Track32  (1:16)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
THE LEGACY OF SLAVERY
What does one do when slave ownership is part of the family history? Is it important to deal with that legacy or is it something to simply leave in the past? For one white man it became necessary to confront his family’s history as slave owners… a history that is a mixture of brutality and a little bit of kindness that shines a light into a sad era of American history. Guest: Chris Tomlinson, author of Tomlinson Hill: The Remarkable Story of Two Families Who Share the Tomlinson Name - One White, One Black. Tomlinson is also the business columnist for the Houston Chronicle and for more than 20 years reported from around the world for the Associated Press.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.