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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   10/24/2014...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
SOYBEAN DISEASE RECAP


Track1  (3:02)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WINTER DRYLOT PREPARATIONS


Track2  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
COUNTRY-OF-ORIGIN LABELING


Track3  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
SOYBEAN DISEASE RECAP
An unusually significant amount of disease was found in this year’s Kansas soybean crop. K-state row crop disease specialist Doug Jardine (jar-DEEN) gives a review of the results discovered. The disease loss estimate ranks as one of the highest ever found in Kansas soybeans. One prevalent disease found was sudden death syndrome. This disease is enhanced by frequent rainfall, even in otherwise healthy fields.

Track4  (:58)  Q…had ever seen.
Jardine says that even soybean varieties built to resist sudden death syndrome were succumbing to it this year. He does note that, in K-State field trials, some experimental lines are showing strong resistance.

Track5  (:32)   Q…sounded death syndrome.
Producers can take some precautions in preventing S-D-S in soybean crops when planting.

Track6  (:30)   Q...get it less.

Tag:That was K-State’s Doug Jardine giving an overview of sudden death syndrome problems in this year’s Kansas soybean crop.
WINTER DRYLOT PREPARATIONS
As the winter season arrives, moisture can accumulate in cattle feeding pens, leading to a buildup of excessive mud. That mud, in turn, can impede cattle feeding performance. To help avoid that, K-State feedlot specialist Chris Reinhardt (RYN-hart) suggests helpful changes to one’s feedlot layout. One can start by assuring that there’s enough slope to promote moisture runoff from feeding areas.

Track7  (:23)   Q…their quality time.
Also, constructing a mound within the pen area will provide cattle a dry place without having to fight moist conditions.

Track8  (:29)  Q...advantage of that.
In addition, cattle may need more pen space during the late fall and winter than they do in the dry summer.

Track9  (1:03)  Q…those pens apart.

Tag:That was K-State’s Chris Reinhardt, advising cattle producers to make feeding pens more accommodating to cattle when conditions become wet and muddy. More information can be found at www.ksre.ksu.edu, or through your local Extension office.
COUNTRY-OF-ORIGIN LABELING
The World Trade Organization recently ruled that the latest version of the USDA’s country-of-origin labeling requirement for retail meat products violates international trade rules. This is the second such W-T-O ruling on the “C-O-O-L” rule. And a K-State livestock economist has his doubts about whether C-O-O-L can ever be W-T-O compliant. Glynn Tonsor has extensively studied U.S. consumer response to the labeling at the retail level.

Track10  (:37)  Q…going back to W-T-O.
But now that the W-T-O has again declared the labeling a trade-distorting mechanism, what’s likely to happen next? Tonsor believes that there will be an effort to retain the labeling, one way or the other.

Track11  (:42)  Q...position to start with.
However, Tonsor is skeptical that the C-O-O-L rule, even with further modifications, can ever pass muster with the W-T-O.

Track12  (:32)  Q...to our trading partners.

Tag:With those thoughts on the future of mandatory country-of-origin labeling of meat products in the U.S. that’s K-State livestock economist Glynn Tonsor.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
UNDERSTANDING A REVERSE MORTGAGE
A reverse mortgage is a home loan that provides cash payments based on home equity. And, while the idea of using your home for cash may be appealing, it’s an important decision that cannot be made hastily or before understanding the benefits and pitfalls. Although a lot of people have seen the commercials for reverse mortgages on television, they don’t understand what it is. K-State Research and Extension family financial planning specialist Elizabeth Kiss (kish) says the absolute number of people in Kansas who have reverse mortgages or who reverse mortgages would be appropriate for are probably pretty low compared to other states, but because they are so heavily advertised, it’s important to understand how they work. Kiss explains how a reverse mortgage differs from a traditional home loan.

Track13  (:35)  Q...certain things with it.
IS A REVERSE MORTGAGE RIGHT FOR YOU?
Before using a reverse mortgage, a borrower typically has a lot of equity in the home. As a homeowner receives payments over time, the mortgage loan balance rises and the amount of equity decreases. The borrower does not have to repay the loan while continuing to live in the home, but when they move out, sell it or die, the loan must be paid off. Kiss (kish) says a reverse mortgage may not be the right financial product for everyone, but it might be the right one for some.

Track14  (:35)  Q...need to be 62 or older.
DELAY TAKING OUT A REVERSE MORTGAGE
In 2012, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau published the results of a study it conducted on reverse mortgages. They reported that in fiscal year 2011, 46% of new reverse mortgage borrowers were younger than 70. Kiss (kish) says people need to remember that when they take out a reverse mortgage the money might not be there later in life.

Track15  (:53)  Q...not available again.

Tag:Most of the defaults occurred because homeowners did not maintain home insurance or property taxes. Homeowners are also responsible for maintenance and upkeep of the home and could face foreclosure if they can’t pay for these items.
HOW TO APPLY FOR A REVERSE MORTGAGE
There are three Home Equity Conversion Mortgage – or HECM (heck-um) loan options to choose from. A traditional HECM loan allows borrowers access to a predetermined amount of equity on their home, a HECM “mini” loan is similar, but only allows borrowers to withdraw 60% of the total eligible loan amount, and the last type of loan is a HECM for purchase. It allows an individual to purchase a home with a substantial down payment and the proceeds from a HECM in a transaction similar to a forward mortgage. However, like other reverse mortgage products, no repayment is due until the owner moves, dies or sells the home. Regardless of which HECM loan option you choose, Kiss (kish) says be prepared for a fairly detailed application process.

Track16  (:57)  Q...and then closing costs.
EDUCATE YOURSELF BEFORE TAKING ACTION
In certain situations, Kiss (kish) says that a reverse mortgage can be a good product. However, she adds that no action should be taken until you have had an opportunity to evaluate the benefit and pitfalls of a reverse mortgage.

Track17  (:38)  Q...to educate yourself.

Tag:Kiss (kish) and assistant professor in the K-State School of Family Studies and Human Services, Martin Seay (see), have released a fact sheet, Understanding Reverse Mortgages: Do They Make Sense For You. The eight-page fact sheet is available online through the K-State Bookstore at www.ksre.ksu.edu/books.
LAWN AND GARDEN
VEGETABLE GARDEN RECORDS
Another vegetable gardening season is coming to a close. And an Extension horticulturist out of K-State recommends that gardeners go through a checklist of steps to finish out the season. Dennis Patton suggests that one start by recording this past season’s garden performance…which vegetable varieties did well and which didn’t, and the layout of the garden itself, as a guide for rotating planting sites next spring.

Track18  (:36)  Q...that’s the first step.
GARDEN CLEAN-UP
A good post-season vegetable garden clean-up is essential to disease control in next year’s production. Patton advises that the spent crop debris from this year be removed quite some distance from the garden plot.

Track19  (:48)  Q...good, productive garden ground.
TOMATO CAGE SANITATION
Most gardeners use cages, stakes or other means of support for tomato plants as they grow and produce. Now that the season is over, those should be fully cleaned as well. Otherwise, says Patton, those can serve as an overwintering site for disease pathogens.

Track20  (:33)  Q...those types of things.
GARDEN SOIL PREPARATION
Right after the garden clean-up would be an excellent time to ready the soil for next year’s vegetable gardening, says Patton. That includes testing the soil for nutrient deficiencies, and potentially adding organic material to improve its ability to grow good crops.

Track21  (1:23)  Q...ready to plant come spring.
STORING GARDEN SEEDS
If one has extra vegetable seeds left over from this season’s gardening, those can easily be stored over the winter. Those seeds ought to be viable for planting next season, according to Patton. He talks here about storage requirements.

Track22  (:30)  Q...increase your return..
KANSAS PROFILE
CAROLYN HARMS
Ron Wilson of K-State’s Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development profiles a rural Kansas woman who successfully went from the farm to the aerospace industry.

Track23  (4:22)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
DAIRY MARGIN PROGRAM (NOTE: This cut has an absolute kill date of 10/28/14)
Though the economics of milk production are in pretty good shape right now, dairy producers should always keep risk management at the forefront. One thing to consider, according to dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook) of K-State Research and Extension is a new farm program option called the Dairy Margin Protection Program. He notes that K-State will be hosting a special webinar on this program for producers on Tuesday, October 28th. (kill date: 10/28)

Track24  (2:00)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
GEESE FEEDING ON SOYBEANS
Canada geese are abundant around Kansas in the late summer and fall. And that can cause a headache for farmers, as those geese will feed on late-season crops, especially soybeans…causing costly losses. A new study out of South Dakota tested the effectiveness of two goose repellant products sprayed on the foliage of soybean stands. This week, K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee talks about the results.

Track25  (5:00)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
UNDERSTANDING A REVERSE MORTGAGE
A reverse mortgage is a home loan that provides cash payments based on home equity. And, while the idea of using your home for cash may be appealing, it’s an important decision that cannot be made hastily or before understanding the benefits and pitfalls. Although a lot of people have seen the commercials for reverse mortgages on television, they don’t understand what it is. K-State Research and Extension family financial planning specialist Elizabeth Kiss (kish) says the absolute number of people in Kansas who have reverse mortgages or who reverse mortgages would be appropriate for are probably pretty low compared to other states, but because they are so heavily advertised, it’s important to understand how they work.

Track26  (14:51)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
CONTROLLING BUSH HONEYSUCKLE
A woody shrub called the bush honeysuckle is invading many wooded areas in parts of Kansas, competing directly with valued tree species. Fall is a great time to control this problem, according to K-State forester Charlie Barden. This week, he talks about the various means of doing so.

Track27  (2:02)  Q…theme music).
(same as above, but without music)


Track28  (2:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
MEXICO WHEAT BUSINESS
The second largest U.S. hard red winter market in the world is not overseas, but just across this country’s southern border. Marsha Boswell talks about the importance for that market to Kansas wheat producers, on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (3:06)  Q…for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
WARM WINDS IN FALL AND WINTER
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp explains that warm winds don’t always come from the south.

Track30  (:58)  Q…Research and Extension.
SNOWFALL VARIATION IN KANSAS
Snow isn’t always greater in the northern part of the state compared to the southern part, according K-State climatologist Mary Knapp.

Track31  (1:10)  Q…Research and Extension.
HALLOWEEN SNOW
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp looks back at Kansas snowfalls on October 31st.

Track32  (:54)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
HIGHER EDUCATION AND THE AMERICAN DREAM
We usually think of institutions of higher education in the United States as facilitating the American dream and offering a system of upward mobility. However, one author and scholar says in the last few decades those institutions have evolved in a way to reinforce or even widen the gaps between people of different socio-economic backgrounds. In other words, American society is becoming ever more unequal, and dramatically so. Today's guest is Suzanne Mettler is the author of Degrees of Inequality: How Higher Education Politics Sabotaged the American Dream. She is also the Clinton Rossiter Professor of American Institutions in the Government Department at Cornell University, a fellow at the Century Foundation, and on the board of the Scholars Strategy Network.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.