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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   02/27/2015...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
BULL HEALTH MANAGEMENT


Track1  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
CROP RENTAL RATES


Track2  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
HERD SIRE SELECTION


Track3  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
BULL HEALTH MANAGEMENT
K-State beef veterinarian Gregg Hanzlicek (HANDS-el-check) is encouraging cow-calf produces to keep bull health management a priority with breeding season approaching. With that, taking the necessary precautions means testing bulls now to avoid all breeding diseases. Hanzlicek stresses how important it is to vaccinate one’s bulls against potential diseases.

Track4  (:39)  Q…reproduction is huge.
When purchasing a bull for the herd, carefully examine the health history of that bull.

Track5  (:34)  Q...on your operation.
Hanzlicek reminds producers that buying a non-virgin bull tends to carry a higher risk of introducing disease to the entire breeding herd.

Track6  (:53)  Q...we deal with.

Tag:That was K-State’s Gregg Hanzlicek, advising ranchers on health management of their herd bulls, for the approaching breading season.
CROP RENTAL RATES
With the drop-off in crop prices in the last several months, farm landlords and tenants alike have loads of questions about what crop lease rates should look like this year. Agricultural economists at Kansas State University have just posted their latest cash rental rate projections for 2015. K-State’s Mykel (Michael) Taylor explains how she and her colleagues arrived at these cash rent numbers.

Track7  (:22)  Q…a rental rate.
And these rental rate projections are figured for each and every county in Kansas, to offer a more local take on cash rents.

Track8  (:45)  Q...in the market.
Taylor notes that the year-to-year change in rental rates is clearly to the downside. However, she stresses this doesn’t necessarily mean that actual rates need to directly follow these projection trends.

Track9  (:43)  Q…and go on.

Tag:That’s K-State agricultural economist Mykel Taylor. K-State’s 2015 cash cropland rental rate report can be found at www.agmanager.info.
HERD SIRE SELECTION
For cow calf operations, spring breeding season will be arriving soon. K-State cow calf specialist Bob Weaber (WEB-ber) shares helpful guidelines to follow when selecting new sire power for herds. Before purchasing, a producer should consider the operation’s intentions heading into breeding season. Using an objective as a solid foundation, Weaber lists several important bull buying tips to help build an operation.

Track10  (:42)  Q…your selection decision.
It’s important to understand what the operation needs most, before selecting for spring breeding.

Track11  (:40)  Q...source bulls from.
Weaber advises all to study the percentage table for the bulls they are most interested in. There is where the most beneficial information can be found.

Track12  (:34)  Q...that you’re comparing.

Tag:That was K-State’s Bob Weaber, providing ranchers with a sense of direction when looking to purchase a new herd sire for spring breeding.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
START BY TAKING EVERYTHING OUT
With the holidays solidly behind us and spring still weeks away, now is a good time to take inventory of all the things that are crammed into the kitchen cupboards, cabinets, pantry, refrigerator and freezer. Organizing each of these areas will save time and money. K-State Research and Extension food scientist Karen Blakeslee suggests starting the organizing process by taking everything out of the cabinets.

Track13  (:43)  Q...of your favorites.
STAY ORGANIZED WITH ORGANIZERS
Once everything is out and the cabinets have been cleaned, Blakeslee recommends using organizers to keep things separated and easier to find.

Track14  (:56)  Q...in one spot.
ORGANIZE LIKE A GROCERY STORE
When organizing a food cabinet, cupboard or pantry, Blakeslee suggests doing what your local grocery store does: group similar foods together.

Track15  (:35)  Q...oldest product first.
DISCARD ALL OUTDATED FOOD ITEMS
As part of the organizing process, you’re sure to find some food items that are out-of-date. Blakeslee says to discard any canned goods, dry goods, spices, dairy or meat that are no longer within the expiration date on the label.

Track16  (:43)  Q...find things easily.
WHAT DO EXPIRATION DATES MEAN?
Because the shelf life of food can vary, expiration dates on the labels can be a little confusing. Blakeslee explains what the various dates on canned goods, packaged food and dairy products really mean for consumers.

Track17  (:48)  Q...for quality and flavor.

Tag:More information on food and food safety is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: http://ww.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
SELECTING APPLE TREES
Since true spring weather is still several weeks ahead, those who are interested in starting fruit tree gardening this year have plenty of time to plan. K-State horticulturist Ward Upham says that any fruit tree project requires careful study before investing. Here, he talks about the pros and cons of growing apples…one of the more well-adapted, yet high-maintenance fruit trees suitable for Kansas.

Track18  (1:39)  Q...be a very intensive thing.
SELECTING CHERRY TREES
Another fruit tree that typically performs well in Kansas growing conditions is the cherry tree. What’s more, it tends to be a low-maintenance fruit-bearer, says Upham….so it is a great candidate for home fruit production…bearing in mind a few considerations before investing in a cherry tree.

Track19  (:51)  Q…to have two different trees.
SELECTING APRICOT TREES
For those who appreciate homegrown apricots, they can be grown successfully in this region, according to Upham. However, the prospective apricot gardener should be aware that apricot trees tend to produce irregularly, depending on Kansas’ fickle weather.

Track20  (:50)  Q...just for that reason.
SELECTING PEACH TREES
Like apricot trees, peach trees are sensitive to the vagaries of Kansas weather. Even so, with adequate management, one can grow peaches successfully when the conditions are right, according to Upham. One thing he stresses is that the fruit load on peach trees needs to be carefully managed.

Track21  (:51)  Q...would need to spray for that.
SELECTING PEAR TREES
If one is looking for a hearty, durable and generally low-maintenance fruit tree, they need look no further than the pear tree—they thrive in Kansas conditions. The key with pears, says Upham, is to know when to harvest the fruit.

Track22  (1:13)  Q...you only need one pear for.
KANSAS PROFILE
SHANE TIFFANY (PART 2)
Increasingly, rural residents find themselves traveling farther from home to buy even the most essential groceries and household items. Ron Wilson of K-State’s Huck Boyd Institute tells us about one successful effort to bring a hometown grocery store to one small Kansas community.

Track23  (4:27)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
KANSAS DAIRY PRODUCTION
Newly released statistics show that the Kansas dairy industry is on the rise, in terms of size of the state’s milking herd and the amount of milk produced. This week, K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (Brook) goes over the numbers, and tells how Kansas stacks up with other dairy states in several production categories.

Track24  (2:00)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
DEVELOPING RABBIT HABITAT
Comparatively speaking, it’s a relatively unsung hunting opportunity in Kansas: the prominence of the cottontail rabbit. In fact, a landowner, if so inclined, can manage habitat to encourage increased rabbit numbers…even though they’re quite prolific in their own right. This week, K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee talks about habitat management for the cottontail.

Track25  (5:00)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
ORGANIZING SAVES TIME AND MONEY
With the holidays behind us, and spring still weeks away, it’s a good time to take inventory of all the things crammed into the kitchen cupboards, refrigerator and freezer. What you’ll probably discover is that the things creating the clutter don’t get used anymore, you have far too many of the same thing, and that some food is well past its expiration date. Karen Blakeslee, a K-State Research and Extension food scientist and coordinator of the Rapid Response Center, says organizing your kitchen will save time and money.

Track26  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
CONSERVATION TREE ORDERS
For landowners with a need for a windbreak or other conservation tree planting, the Kansas Conservation Tree Planting Program can assist with low-cost tree and shrub seedlings. That program, conducted by the Kansas Forest Service at K-State, is now taking orders for this plant material. K-State forester Charlie Barden talks more about this opportunity.

Track27  (2:01)  Q…(theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)


Track28  (1:57)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
WHEAT VARIETY REPORT
Varieties from the K-State wheat breeding program remain prolific across the Kansas wheat production landscape, according to new USDA numbers. Marsha Boswell has more in this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (2:53)  Q… I’m Marsha Boswell.
WEATHER WONDERS
”DUCK” FROM SEVERE WEATHER
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp (nap) kicks off Severe Weather Awareness Week with an acronym to help families stay safe when severe weather strikes.

Track30  (:48)  Q…Research and Extension.
FLASH FLOODING
It only takes a small amount of rainfall to create flash flooding. K-State climatologist Mary Knapp (nap) explains some of these factors, and what we can do to stay safe.

Track31  (:59)  Q…Research and Extension.
KEEP ALERT
To conclude Severe Weather Awareness Week, K-State climatologist Mary Knapp (nap) reviews some of the systems and devices that can deliver severe weather alerts to your home or workplace.

Track32  (:46)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
THE VALUE OF A COLLEGE EDUCATION
A report put out in April of last year says that the leading public universities in the United States, “often called flagship universities, do a poor job of ensuring that undergraduate students engage in an intellectually vibrant campus culture and leave with a solid foundation of common skills and knowledge.” In addition, almost two-thirds of these leading universities have at some point used a nationally normed assess¬ment of student progress in core collegiate skills, but only one in four makes those results publicly available. Guests: Dr. Michael Poliakoff, vice president of policy at American Council of Trustees and Alumni; and Armand Alacbay, director of trustee programs for ACTA.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.