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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   05/25/2015...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
WHEAT HEAT STRESS


Track1  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
CONTROLLING PASTURE BUCKBRUSH


Track2  (3:03)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
SUMMER HORSE NUTRITION


Track3  (2:51)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
WHEAT HEAT STRESS
During the grain filling period in late spring, winter wheat prefers cooler temperatures. If climate change leads to warmer temperature trends, how will that likely impact wheat yields, costing the grower? A Kansas State University agricultural economist was among those researching that question recently. K-State’s Andy Barkley outlines the mission of this study.

Track4  (:30)  Q…with this study.
Barkley and colleagues combined K-State wheat yield data from 11 locations in Kansas with late-spring weather data for those same locations, over an 18-year time span, from 1985-2013. Here’s what they discovered.

Track5  (:44)  Q...the weather gets hotter.
But there is an upside to this, says Barkley: wheat scientists have already taken note of the value of heat tolerance, and are now focusing on that in their genetics work.

Track6  (:32)  Q...deal with hotter temperatures.

Tag:On climate change and the ensuing effect on winter wheat yields, that’s K-State agricultural economist Andy Barkley.
CONTROLLING PASTURE BUCKBRUSH
Among the various invasive plant species found in Kansas pastures, one of the more aggressive is buckbrush. Now is an excellent time for pasture managers to utilize chemical control of buckbrush. K-State pasture management specialist, Walt Fick, talks about dealing with this invasive woody intruder, saying that it can become a major problem if left unaddressed.

Track7  (:30)  Q…the pasture, as well.
If the terrain allows, mowing buckbrush now is an alternative to using herbicide.

Track8  (:35)  Q...that with a mower.
If mowing is not feasible, then herbicides are a suitable option, as Fick discusses here.

Track9  (1:09)  Q…in straight 2,4-D.

Tag:That’s Walt Fick, K-State pasture management specialist, talking about the basic management used against buckbrush.
SUMMER HORSE NUTRITION
Oftentimes, as spring turns into summer, horse owners may forget to keep an eye on the changing nutritional needs of their horse, part of which has to do with the changing nutrition level of the grass. Equine scientist James Lattimer of Kansas State University talks about summer horse nutrition. In addition to grass condition, he says that owners should consider the physical activity of the horse itself.

Track10  (:39)  Q…typically goes up.
Lattimer also discusses the differences between protein and fat in a horse’s feed ration and how each affects their growth and development.

Track11  (:32)  Q...feed with a fat.
Lastly, Lattimer explains the importance of mineral supplements in a horse’s diet as it fits into the summer feeding program.

Track12  (:46)  Q...mineral in there.

Tag:Lastly, Lattimer explains the importance of mineral supplements in a horse’s diet as it fits into the summer feeding program.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
WALK KANSAS GETS PEOPLE MOVING
Walk Kansas, which started March 15th and ended May 9th, is a team-based health initiative that encourages participants to increase their physical activity over the course of eight weeks. To achieve their goal to walk across Kansas, participants are required to get a minimum of 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity on at least five days each week. K-State Research and Extension northeast area family and consumer sciences specialist and state coordinator of Walk Kansas, Sharolyn (SHAIR-oh-lihn) Jackson, says the initial survey results from this year’s walk show 84% met the minimum goal for physical activity.

Track13  (:20)  Q...that's really encouraging.
EAT MORE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
Jackson says one of the greatest impact areas for Walk Kansas has been getting participants to eat more fruits and vegetables – which improves their overall eating habits.

Track14  (:31)  Q...make the changes happen.
EMPLOYERS RECOGNIZE THE BENEFITS
As Walk Kansas has grown over the years, more employers are encouraging employees to participate – and Jackson says that participation is good for both.

Track15  (:36)  Q...significant change there.
YOU’LL SEE ALMOST INSTANT RESULTS
Even though Walk Kansas is only an eight week program, Jackson says it won’t take that long for participants to start seeing – and feeling – results.

Track16  (:43)  Q...you see these benefits.
SOME WALK KANSAS SUCCESS STORIES
As part of the Walk Kansas survey, participants are asked to share success stories. Jackson says those stories vary from person-to-person and team-to-team.

Track17  (:50)  Q...motivational walking buddy.

Tag:Walk Kansas participants also say they’ve become closer with their families – even if the entire family isn’t officially participating – because the whole family gets involved in walking and achieving some of the lifestyle changes. For more information, visit WalkKansas.org. To find out more about health and nutrition programs offered in your area, contact the local county or district Extension office.
LAWN AND GARDEN
THINNING TREE FRUIT
Hard is it might be to do for some home fruit gardeners, actually thinning some of the emerging fruit from an apple, peach or other tree is a sound management step, according to K-State horticulturist Gregg Eyestone. Thinning that fruit growth promotes larger, higher quality fruit at harvest. And Eyestone adds that there are other reasons for doing this as well.

Track18  (:55)  Q...the production of some fruit.
TIMING OF FRUIT THINNING
Yearly thinning of tree fruit is very good for the long-term productivity of any fruit tree, as Eyestone explains. He says that now would be an excellent time to get after it.

Track19  (:46)  Q...part of that process.
ADEQUATE FRUIT SPACING
The general objective of thinning tree fruit at this point of the growing season is to promote relatively even distribution of the fruit throughout the tree. There are some basic spacing guidelines to start with, as Eyestone talks about here.

Track20  (1:10)  Q...fruit on that particular branch.
OTHER FRUIT SPACING
Aside from apples, do other types of fruit trees call for different degrees of early-summer thinning? Eyestone says perhaps, but nothing drastically different from how one would thin their apples.

Track21  (:28)  Q...baseline to go from.
THINNING BRAMBLE FRUIT?
As a home gardener would thin their tree fruit at this time of the year, would they also do well to thin the early fruit on their brambles? Eyestone says no, not the fruit itself…although that fruit-bearing shrub may benefit from a different kind of thinning.

Track22  (:29)  Q...remove flowers or fruit.
KANSAS PROFILE
MICHAEL PERRY – AQUA SHIELD
Ron Wilson of K-State’s Huck Boyd Institute looks at a Kansas entrepreneur who is finding success in the roofing business

Track23  (4:31)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
POST-FRESH COW NUTRITION
Nutritional management is an ongoing cause on every dairy. This week, K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook) asks producers to focus on the nutritional needs of the post-fresh dairy cow. Research indicates that this is a highly pivotal stage of nutrition for the herd, with respect to milk production.

Track24  (1:59)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
KOI AND GOLDFISH
One of the reasons why some homeowners like to install backyard ponds as part of their landscape is that the fish they can raise in those ponds, koi and goldfish, require fairly low maintenance. This week, K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee talks about the management requirements of these colorful fish, which often ascend to “pet” status with their owners.

Track25  (4:58)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
EIGHT WEEKS TO BETTER HEALTH
Walk Kansas is a team-based health initiative that encourages participants to increase their physical activity over the course of eight weeks. To achieve their goal to walk across Kansas, participants are required to get a minimum of 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity on at least five days each week. Walk Kansas also includes a nutrition component, informational tips, and motivational support. The theme for this year’s walk, which started March 15th and ended May 9th, was Walk Tall, Walk Strong. K-State Research and Extension northeast area family and consumer sciences specialist and state coordinator of Walk Kansas, Sharolyn (SHAIR-oh-lihn) Jackson, highlights some of the success stories from this year’s Walk Kansas.

Track26  (14:51)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
BUFFER STRIP PLANTING
Many areas near Kansas rivers and streams could benefit from a buffer strip…that is, a tree planting that will help secure the soil in that area and protect water quality. This week, watershed forester Mitch Lundeen of the Kansas Forest Service talks about a special program that can provide financial and technical support for landowners wanting to establish buffer strips.

Track27  (2:05)  Q…(theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)
(same as above, but without music bed)

Track28  (2:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
WHEAT CONTEST REMINDER
The deadline for enrolling in this year’s Kansas Wheat Yield Contest is fast approaching. Marsha Boswell provides a reminder on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (2:58)  Q...I'm Marsha Boswell.
WEATHER WONDERS
***TIME SENSITIVE – INTENDED FOR AIRPLAY ONLY ON MONDAY, MAY 25*** UDALL TORNADO –
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp (nap) looks back at the devastating storm that hit southeast Kansas on this date more than half-a-century ago.

Track30  (:56)  Q…Research and Extension.
HAILSTONE RECORDS
Hail is a common weather event, but some hailstones can get dangerously large, according to K-State climatologist Mary Knapp.

Track31  (1:17)  Q…Research and Extension.
START OF SUMMER
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp explains how the start of the season can have different meanings, depending upon perspective.

Track32  (:43)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
FOSTER CARE PROBLEMS
On any given night, some 57-thousand children in United States child welfare systems are going to bed without the care and comfort of a family. In its latest KIDS COUNT policy report, Every Kid Needs a Family: Giving Children in the Child Welfare System the Best Chance for Success, the Annie E. Casey Foundation examines the sobering statistics that point to the urgent need to ensure that everything possible is being done to find loving, nurturing and supported families to help raise more of these children. The guests are Tracey Field and Robert Geen of the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Robert Geen is the director of policy reform and advocacy, also at the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.