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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   12/01/2014...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
CATTLE HANDLING FACILITIES


Track1  (3:02)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
SOIL TESTING ECONOMICS


Track2  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
4-H LIVESTOCK RECORD APP


Track3  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
CATTLE HANDLING FACILITIES
Cattle handling facilities are an important part of any cattle operation, small or large. K-State beef system specialist Justin Waggoner suggests to producers that, with current record high beef prices, this may be a feasible time to consider upgrades to one’s operation. Depending on size and layout of facilities, small additions such as gates or alleyways may help contribute to make a more functional operation.

Track4  (:32)  Q…in the future.
Waggoner says producers should take into consideration what may be needed in terms of different types of cattle operations. When making changes, modifying facilities should take place in stages.

Track5  (:47)  Q…it in phases.
A common cattle handing system that would be a helpful addition, according to Waggoner, is something called a “Bud box.”

Track6  (:36)  Q...all those aspects.

Tag:That was K-State’s Justin Waggoner commenting on upgrades to cattle facilities, the subject of an article that he recently published in the Beef Tips Newsletter. To view this material visit www.ksubeef.org.
SOIL TESTING ECONOMICS
Tracking the nutrient levels in crop fields via soil testing has long been considered a sound agronomic practice. The economics of soil sampling are just as proven, according to a K-State analysis. And that’s important to consider, even as crop prices have drifted lower. In endorsing the routine use of soil testing, K-State crop nutrient specialist Dorivar Ruiz-Diaz (DOHR-ah-var roo-EEZ DEE-az) talks about the K-State study which backs up his contention.

Track7  (:49)  Q…at the end of the season.
And what does the K-State analysis say, exactly, about economic returns to soil testing?

Track8  (:11)  Q...a conservative estimate.
Ruiz-Diaz understands why crop producers are striving to cut costs as grain prices are on the low side. However, he urges them not to scrap soil testing.

Track9  (:56)  Q…coming from soil testing.

Tag:On the economic value of soil testing, that’s K-State crop nutrient specialist Dorivar Ruiz-Diaz.
4-H LIVESTOCK RECORD APP
Youth and adults involved in 4-H livestock projects now have a portable means of keeping track of their cattle, hog, sheep and goat project activity. A new smart phone app has been created that allows 4-Hers to record their livestock project data on the go. K-State 4-H specialist Justin Wiebers (WEE-burs) was part of a national team that developed this app for Apple-based devices. He talks more about its purpose.

Track10  (:31)  Q…throughout the year.
Wiebers talks about some of the valuable functions of this livestock record app.

Track11  (:41)  Q...animals for each kid.
The unveiling of this app has Wiebers and colleagues looking ahead to adapting the concept to other areas of 4-H project work.

Track12  (:39)  Q...as the owner of them.

Tag:K-State 4-H specialist Justin Wiebers. To access this new 4-H livestock record app, simply look for it in the app store on your I-Phone or I-Pad.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
“DINING IN” FOR HEALTHY FAMILIES
Eating healthier foods, saving money and building relationships are just a few of the benefits of “dining in” with your family. While today’s active lifestyles don’t always make that possible, there’s an effort to get as many families as possible to “dine in” on December 3rd. It’s all part of the inaugural Family and Consumer Sciences Day. In conjunction with this global event, K-State Research and Extension family and consumer sciences specialist are encouraging families across the state to prepare and eat a healthy meal at home. K-State Research and Extension family and consumer sciences specialist for northeast Kansas, Sharolyn (SHAIR-oh-lin) Jackson, says one reason families don’t eat at home more often is because they don’t take the time to plan for those meals.

Track13  (:38)  Q...happen for them.
THE SIGNIFICANCE OF DECEMBER 3RD
Jackson says December 3rd was chosen as the date for Family and Consumer Sciences Day to honor the original home economics superwoman – Ellen Swallow Richards.

Track14  (:23)  Q...many different ways.

Tag:Among her many accomplishments, Richards organized the school lunch program which still exists today and was responsible for designing the Rumford Kitchen exhibit at the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago. This tiny kitchen served nutritious meals to thousands of fairgoers, along with a healthy dose of nutrition education.
THE BENEFITS OF EATING TOGETHER
K-State Research and Extension assistant director of family and consumer sciences, Paula Peters, says there’s science-based evidence that shows eating at home has many positive outcomes for families.

Track15  (:36)  Q...kind of lifestyle, as well.
START THE DINING IN PROCESS SLOWLY
For families who have struggled to dine together in the past, Peters says the “Dining In” event on December 3rd provides an opportunity to commit to dining in – which is viewed as the first step to eating more at-home meals together.

Track16  (:50)  Q...family time together.
PARTICIPATING IN THE “DINING IN” EVENT
To participate in the “Dining In” for Healthy Families event, which has a goal of reaching 200,000 families, Jackson says you can sign up on the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences website: www.aafcs.org/FCSday.

Track17  ()  Q...your family on that day.

Tag:More information on the family and consumer sciences programs being offered in Kansas is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
TREE LEAF RETENTION
Quirky weather has seemingly been the norm around Kansas this fall. And because of that, numerous landscape deciduous trees have not fully shed of their leaves yet. K-State horticulturist Ward Upham (UH-puhm) outlines the situation, explaining what has prompted trees that have normally dropped all their leaves by now to retain them instead.

Track18  (1:00)  Q...have retained their leaves.
DAMAGE FROM LEAF RETENTION
Because it is so unusual, homeowners are asking Upham if this late retention of tree leaves will jeopardize the health of the tree in any way. He says not likely…except if those leaves would collect ice in a storm, putting more stress on the tree’s structure.

Track19  (:25)  Q...ice or heavy snowstorms.
HOUSEPLANT LEAF LOSS
Now that houseplants are safely secure indoors for the winter, some plants are shedding leaves profusely, which concerns the homeowner. Upham explains that this is usually not a case of substandard plant care, but rather, a natural phenomenon.

Track20  (:52)  Q...in order to compensate.
PLANT CARE RESPONSE
If one’s houseplants are, in fact, losing foliage and looking rough, what should the homeowner do? Upham urges folks not to overreact, stressing that what one doesn’t do is more important.

Track21  (1:05)   Q...just a lack of light.
ASHES ON GARDEN AREAS
Colder weather is here to stay for a while. And folks are already burning firewood. A common notion is that the ashes from the fireplace can serve as a nutrient source for gardening. Upham strongly discourages applying those ashes to the garden plot, at least in this region.

Track22  (:45)  Q...plant just can't get them.
KANSAS PROFILE
BASIL DANNEBOHM (BAY-zehl DAN-uh-bahm)
Ron Wilson of K-State’s Huck Boyd Institute profiles a man whose health challenges caused him to re-evaluate his life and return to his native Kansas, where he is making a difference for his rural community and state.

Track23  (4:24)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
CHECKING NEW SILAGE
Not always do dairy cows immediately take to new silage when it’s first fed to them. And it behooves the producer to find out if that’s having a negative impact on production. This week, K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook) comments on inspecting the silage product and tracking how the cow herd is responding to it.

Track24  (2:00)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
BEAVER DAMAGE RESURGENCE
The lingering drought in recent years may have been the reason why K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee had been receiving fewer calls about beaver damage to waterways and farm ponds. However, as streams and ponds have been somewhat replenished by moisture this year, reports of beaver problems have picked back up. This week, Charlie reminds listeners about the recommended damage control measures.

Track25  (4:59)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
“DINING IN” FOR HEALTHY FAMILIES
Eating healthier foods, saving money and building relationships are just a few of the benefits of “dining in” with your family. While today’s active lifestyles don’t always make that possible, there’s an effort to get as many families as possible to “dine in” on December 3rd. It’s all part of the inaugural Family and Consumer Sciences Day. In conjunction with this global event, K-State Research and Extension family and consumer sciences specialist are encouraging families across the state to prepare and eat a healthy meal at home.

Track26  (14:51)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
RED MAPLE CONCERNS
A number of homeowners have taken to the appearance of red maples, and in fact have planted them in their landscapes. K-State forest health specialist Ryan Armbrust (ARM-broost) understands the appeal of red maples…but this tree really struggles in Kansas’ winter conditions. On this week’s Tree Tales, he talks about the concerns associated with red maples.

Track27  (2:00)  Q…(theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)


Track28  (1:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
WHEAT DISEASE BREAKTHROUGH
Viral plant diseases have long been the bane of wheat producers in the Great Plains region. A major new scientific advance out of Kansas State University, funded by wheat producers, holds great promise in the battle against those costly viruses. Marsha Boswell has more in this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (2:58)  Q…for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
COLD DECEMBER
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp (nap) notes that a cold November doesn’t necessarily mean that a cold December will follow.

Track30  (1:12)  Q…Research and Extension.
ICY WINTER PRECIPITATION
In addition to snow and freezing rain, there are other common types of frozen precipitation, according to K-State climatologist Mary Knapp.

Track31  (:55)  Q…Research and Extension.
HEATING DEGREE DAYS
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp tells about a unique way to monitor energy use and help calculate fuel needs.

Track32  (:51)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
A TWO-GENERATION APPROACH TO POVERTY – PART TWO
More than 21 percent of Kansas children, some 40-thousand, live in poverty. That’s an increase of 22 percent over the past five years. And policy changes to programs such as Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, known as TANF, have made it more difficult for low-income families and their kids to gain access to the assistance they need. Now, new recommendations from the Annie E. Casey Foundation propose integrating state and federal employment, education and child care programs for parents and children to create a better life for families. The guest is Shannon Cotsoradis, president and CEO of Kansas Action for Children.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.