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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   09/26/2014...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
BEEF QUALITY ASSURANCE


Track1  (3:02)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
KANSAS FARMLAND VALUES


Track2  (3:02)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
RENEGOTIATING CROP LEASES


Track3  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
BEEF QUALITY ASSURANCE
The Beef Quality Assurance training program is an important part of beef industry stewardship. Individual producers who choose to complete the B-Q-A certification learn about orienting their management toward producing a wholesome beef product. Director of the Beef Cattle Institute at Kansas State University, Dan Thomson, recaps the mission of the B-Q-A training. The program continues to grow every year.

Track4  (:42)  Q…state of Kansas.
For a producer to become certified, they can expect to learn about improving their profitability through their management style.

Track5  (:30)  Q...of an industry.
With what the B-Q-A program has accomplished so far, it has created a strong foundation for the future of beef cattle production.

Track6  (:45)  Q...the program ourselves.

Tag:That was K-State’s Dan Thomson, sharing information about the Beef Quality Assurance program. To learn more about B-Q-A or to get certified, visit, www.animalcaretraining.org.
KANSAS FARMLAND VALUES
Trends in farm and ranch land values always show an interest to producers. K-State agricultural economist Bryan Schurle (SURE-ly) recently covered the topic of land values at the K-State Risk and Profit Conference. Schurle has made an effort to talk to agricultural land appraisers about current land value trends. They have noticed that the rush to buy more farmland has slowed down from what it was in recent years.

Track7  (:50)  Q…quite a bit.
Schurle notes that producers currently feel uncertain about the value of land, when selling or buying.

Track8  (:32)  Q...basically about flat.
Comparing to current trends, Schurle talks about what took place in the 1980s, when land prices plunged with the severe drop in the overall agricultural economy. He says that right now, there’s no danger of history repeating itself.

Track9  (:39)  Q…that we've seen.

Tag:That was K-State’s Bryan Schurle, monitoring the trends in farm and ranch land values in Kansas.
RENEGOTIATING CROP LEASES
When crop prices soared in recent years, rental rates for crop ground rose along with them. Now that grain prices have fallen substantially, those lease agreements may well be due for renegotiation. K-State agricultural economist Mykel (Michael) Taylor encourages tenants and landlords alike to take another look at those leases, especially the cash leasing arrangements, to see if they need to be modified according to the current market climate.

Track10  (:35)  Q...expected for next year.
And there is a handy tool from K-State that will help the tenant make the argument for renegotiating the cash lease.

Track11  (:41)  Q...and things like that.
Working through the numbers via the spreadsheet will make for a smoother discussion over amending the current lease, for both tenant and landlord, says Taylor.

Track12  (:38)  Q...back with their expectations.

Tag:Again, to access the KSULease spreadsheet, go to www.agmanager.info. That’s K-State agricultural economist Mykel Taylor.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
A HEALTHY, SUSTAINABLE DIET
The food choices we make impact our health, and the health of the planet. A publication from K-State Research and Extension spotlights simple everyday ways to have a tasty, healthful, and sustainable diet – that’s good for us and the environment. K-State human nutrition specialist, registered dietitian, and author of the publication: Making Everyday Choices for a Healthy, Sustainable Diet, Mary Meck Higgins, says “sustainable” has many definitions.

Track13  (:59)  Q...environmental health.
WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE
When a problem is so big we start to wonder if we can make a difference, Higgins says that’s the time to wrap our head around the idea that making some small changes will eventually make a big difference.

Track14  (:22)  Q...our planet's health.
HEALTHY US, HEALTHY PLANET
Higgins says there are a number of simple steps anyone can take to improve their health and the health of the planet.

Track15  (:50)  Q...can do something.
BUY FEWER PROCESSED FOODS
According to Higgins, one of the biggest changes we can make to improve our health and protect the environment is to replace processed foods with natural – or “real” foods.

Track16  (:41)  Q...in the long run.
BUYING NUTRIENT-RICH FOODS
If you’re looking to get the biggest bang for your food dollar, Higgins suggests buying nutrient-rich foods over processed foods.

Track17  (:53)  Q...as much money.

Tag:The publication, Making Everyday Choices for a Healthy, Sustainable Diet, is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
LAWN SEED SELECTION
It’s fall lawn planting time. Conditions now are ideal for starting, or overseeding, a cool-season lawn like fescue or Kentucky bluegrass. There are several steps to succeeding with this project. However, it all starts with proper seed selection, according to K-State turfgrass specialist Jared Hoyle. And what he’s getting at there is not so much variety selection, as choosing weed-free seed.

Track18  (:56)  Q...in it as well.
PRE-PLANT LAWN MOWING
Seed-to-soil contact is essential to successfully over-seeding a cool-season lawn. The very step to accomplishing that, says Hoyle, is mowing the existing grass down to a height which will allow the seed to reach the soil.

Track19  (:34)  Q...get to the surface.
CONDITIONING LAWN SOIL
The next, and perhaps most important, step in readying a lawn for overseeding is running specific preparation equipment over the lawn to disturb the soil and make it more receptive to the seed as it’s broadcast. Hoyle notes that any of several devices will serve this purpose.

Track20  (:59)  Q...verti-cutter will really help.
LAWN SEEDING AND FEEDING
Once the site is ready, broadcasting the lawn seed and fertilizer is next. Hoyle recommends a certain way of doing that. He also talks about seeding and fertilizer rates guidelines to follow.

Track21  (1:14)  Q...per thousand square feet.
NEW LAWN WATERING
Lastly, one wants to assure that their newly-seeded lawn is adequately watered. And at the start, the normal lawn watering rules change a bit, says Hoyle. Making water available to the new seedlings more frequently is required for good establishment.

Track22  (:53)  Q...comes spring, as well.
KANSAS PROFILE
WARD MORGAN – CIVICPLUS
Ron Wilson of the Huck Boyd Institute at K-State reveals that a website in Kansas hosts and designs sites for some of the nation’s largest companies.

Track23  (4:29)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
DAIRY SAFETY AWARENESS
Safety should always be a top priority on the dairy, according to K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (Brook). And as the pace ramps up even further in the fall, producers are advised to troubleshoot for potential hazards and correct them. Brouk also talks this week about assuring that dairy employees are up to speed on safety practices.

Track24  (2:01)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
CONSERVATION PROGRAMS STUDY
There’s been considerable discussion of late about the habitat of the lesser prairie chicken in the Great Plains region. Adding to that dialogue is a new USDA analysis of two of its major conservation programs, and the impact those are having on the breeding, or lek, sites of this bird. This week, K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee takes a look at that study and its findings.

Track25  (5:01)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
HOW TO LIVE MORE SUSTAINABLY
Sustainability is often associated with saving the planet by using less energy and reducing our overall carbon footprint. But, just how difficult is it to live more sustainably? A publication from K-State Research and Extension offers dozens of ways to have a tasty, healthful and sustainable diet – and at the same time have a positive impact on the environment. On today’s Sound Living: the first in a two-part series with K-State Research and Extension human nutrition specialist, registered dietitian and author of the publication: Making Everyday Choices for a Healthy, Sustainable Diet, Mary Meck Higgins.

Track26  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
FOREST STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM
Properly managing tree resources is a responsibility shared by all landowners, as K-State forester Bob Atchison sees it. To that end, the USDA’s Forest Stewardship Program assists landowners financially in their tree management efforts. That program is the central topic of this week’s Tree Tales.

Track27  (1:58)  Q…theme music).
(same as above, but without music)


Track28  (1:54)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
WHEAT COMMISSION ELECTIONS
Very soon now, wheat growers in the western part of the state can determine who will represent them on the Kansas Wheat Commission for the next three years. Marsha Boswell has more on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (3:02)  Q…for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
CONTRASTS IN CALIFORNIA AND KANSAS RAINFALL
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp notes that while the west coast suffers lack of rain, the central plains have had plenty.

Track30  (:57)  Q…Research and Extension.
TWILIGHT
How does one define “twilight?” K-State climatologist Mary Knapp explains.

Track31  (:49)  Q…Research and Extension.
DOES SUMMER WEATHER PREDICT FROST DATES?
State climatologist Mary Knapp explains that it’s more about moisture than temperature.

Track32  (:55)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
THE IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE
In October of 2013, former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg, hedge fund magnate Tom Steyer, and former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson funded an independent examination of the risks created by climate change. That report, called “Risky Business,” found that climate change could end up costing the United States’ economy hundreds of billions of dollars by 2050. The guest is Mark Schapiro is the author of Carbon Shock: A Tale of Risk and Calculus on the Front Lines of a Disrupted Global Economy. He is also an adjunct professor at the University of California-Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism and at the Monterey Institute of International Studies.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.