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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   07/17/2014...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
WHEAT STUBBLE WEEDS


Track1  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
COVER CROP PRODUCTION


Track2  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT


Track3  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
WHEAT STUBBLE WEEDS
Just-harvested wheat fields have been overrun by weed growth around Kansas. And no matter what the future cropping plans for that ground may be, controlling those weeds now is of the essence, according to a K-State weed management specialist. Of greatest concern would be those weeds that are showing resistance to glyphosate herbicide…producers need to adjust their herbicide choices accordingly, as Curt Thompson points out.

Track4  (:40)  Q…in the drier conditions.
Another weed species that has demonstrated tolerance for glyphosate of late is Palmer amaranth. Thompson talks about the control strategy for it in wheat stubble.

Track5  (:26)  Q...along with glyphosate.
And though it has yet to be confirmed, there’s some thought that Russian thistle might be showing glyphosate resistance as well. Thompson advises producers to give that due consideration.

Track6  (:46)  Q...of managing that one.

Tag:K-State weed management specialist Curt Thompson, on post-harvest control of weeds in wheat stubble. He recommends that producers refer to the 2014 Chemical Weed Control Guide from K-State, available on line or through the local Extension office.
COVER CROP PRODUCTION
The use of cover crops continues to increase in the state of Kansas. K-State soil management specialist DeAnn Presley recently gave a presentation concerning cover crop problem solving at the K-State summer agronomy field day in Manhattan. There, she explained why some producers are turning to this method, some as a conservation measure, and others, for forage production. Cover cropping has also shown benefits to soil structure and health over an extended period of time.

Track7  (:35)  Q…improve soil properties.
Presley predicts cover crop usage will continue to expand around the state.

Track8  (:52)  Q...will probably increase.
Some producers look for ways to improve their cover crops. With that, Presley says that cash and cover crops complement each other.

Track9  (:38)  Q…of an interaction.

Tag:That was K-State’s DeAnn Presley, speaking about the use of cover crops at the K-State summer agronomy field day.
WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT
Protecting our water resources in Kansas is important. A visible water quality issue is sedimentation into reservoirs, but an invisible issue is the unintentional nutrient transport into our waters. At the recent K-State agronomy summer field day, K-State environmental quality agronomist Peter Tomlinson (TOM-len-son) spoke about nutrient stewardship as a part of water resource preservation.

Track10  (:29)  Q…our cropping system.
Tomlinson elaborates on each of those key points, and what producers need to consider when selecting and applying crop nutrient products.

Track11  (:48)  Q...apply those nutrients.
In addition to those considerations, Tomlinson says that there are other management factors to consider.

Track12  (:41)  Q...our surface waters.

Tag:That was K-State’s Peter Tomlinson, demonstrating at the K-State agronomy summer field day why producers should consider protecting out state’s water supply in agricultural practices.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
AMERICANS LACK EMERGENCY SAVINGS
More than a quarter of Americans have no emergency savings, according to an annual survey conducted by Bankrate.com. Of those who do have savings, 67% have less than six months’ worth of expenses, what many financial experts call the recommended amount, and those with at least three months’ worth of expenses declined from 45% in 2013 to 40% in in 2014. The percentage of those who say they have no emergency savings has fluctuated between a low of 24% and a high of 28% since 2011. K-State Research and Extension family resource management specialist Elizabeth Kiss (kish) says there are several reasons why personal savings haven’t increased since the recession hit in 2009.

Track13  (:45)  Q...intimidating, too.
THINK ABOUT YOUR MOTIVATION TO SAVE
If you’re having trouble building an emergency fund, think about why you need emergency savings. Kiss (kish) says if we think about what the motivation to save might be, the easier it is to save.

Track14  (:45)  Q...to pay for that.

Tag:The consequence of not having adequate emergency savings could mean using high-cost borrowing, check cashing or a payday lender.
HOW MUCH CAN YOU REALISTICALLY SAVE?
Once you’ve committed to building an emergency fund, Kiss (kish) says you have to determine how much you can realistically save – or put aside – each month.

Track15  (:47)  Q...just save some more.
IDENTIFY AND PLUG YOUR SPENDING LEAKS
If you don’t think there’s any way you can put money into an emergency savings account, Kiss (kish) suggests identifying some of your “spending Leaks” – those small regular purchases which add up over time.

Track16  (:39)  Q...that you can set aside.

Tag:Kiss (kish) also suggests looking at where your thermostat is set. Raising the setting a few degrees in the summer and lowering it a few degrees in the winter, especially when no one is home, can reduce heating and cooling bills – freeing up more money for your emergency fund.
SEPARATE SAVINGS AND CHECKING ACCOUNTS
Kiss (kish) says most people will be more successful in building an emergency fund if they maintain a separate account for savings.

Track17  (:28)  Q...about those, as well.

Tag:More information on building an emergency fund is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu. You can also find other money saving tips and strategies online at: www.americasaves.org.
LAWN AND GARDEN
TOMATO BACTERIA DISEASE
Garden tomatoes are prone to any of several plant diseases right now, according to a K-State horticultural disease specialist. One condition in particular is something growers typically don’t see every year. It’s found on the tomato leaves, and Megan Kennally (ken-NELL-ee) describes it as a bacterial speck.

Track18  (1:04)  Q...what gets lost.
CULTURAL DISEASE CONTROL
The first thought gardeners usually have when they see diseases on their tomatoes is to apply a fungicide treatment. In the case of this bacterial speck, such a treatment won’t do any good. Kennelly recommends instead that growers focus on cultural means of disease control.

Track19  (:35)  Q...or grass mulch.
TOMATO ROOT ROT
Another common tomato disease problem that Kennelly is hearing about this season is a root rot, which has largely been prompted by overly abundant rainfall, complicated by poor drainage in the gardening area.

Track20  (:46)  Q...are out there.
OVERSATURATED LAWN GRASSES
Additionally, numerous home lawns are hurting from poor drainage conditions. In those areas, says Kennelly, the grass is simply not getting enough oxygen to thrive.

Track21  (:52)  Q...improve the drainage.
TREE AND SHRUB PROBLEMS
K-State has just released a detailed publication, complete with extensive color photography, covering the wide assortment of growth problems that landscape trees and shrubs can encounter in the Kansas environment. Kennelly was one of the co-authors of this fine publication, which is now available through local Extension offices.

Track22  (:58)  Q...recognize those situations.
KANSAS PROFILE
JILL MARTIN
On the last edition of “Kansas Profile,” we met a rising star in the country music scene, who got his start in rural Kansas. Today, Ron Wilson, director of the Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development at Kansas State University, introduces us to his wife, who’s making her own mark on the music scene.

Track23  (4:15)  Q...with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
ENCOURAGING DAIRY WORKERS
Constant worker turnover can be a real hindrance for a dairy operation. K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (Brook) advises dairy producers facing this problem to step back and analyze why their employees leave the operation. That might lead to some ideas that promote worker longevity on an operation.

Track24  (1:59)  Q...(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
RABBIT REPELLANT TEST
A new research trial recently evaluated the performance of several commercial repellant products designed to deter cottontail rabbits from gardens and landscapes, where they can do considerable damage. And as part of this study, those products were also compared to the use of fencing, as a means of protecting plants from rabbits. K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee reports on the findings of this evaluation.

Track25  (5:00)  Q...(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
SAVING FOR UNEXPECTED EXPENSES
More than a quarter of Americans have no emergency savings, according to an annual survey conducted by Bankrate.com. Of those who do have savings, 67% have less than six months’ worth of expenses. While it’s nice to have a large sum set aside for emergencies, K-State Research and Extension family resource management specialist Elizabeth Kiss (kish) says having access to $500 to $1,000 of savings will help most people meet unexpected expenses. On today’s Sound Living: ways to start building an emergency fund.

Track26  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
SAVING DECLINING TREES
Over the last several years, drought has ravaged tree resources in the Great Plains and the West. Even hardy species like eastern red cedar have suffered mightily in the dry conditions. The Kansas Forest Service stands ready to assist landowners in restoring shelterbelts and other tree plantings, as outlined this week by K-State forester Bob Atchison.

Track27  (2:00)  Q...(theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)

Track28  (1:58)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
FOOD FOR PEACE
Sixty years ago, a grassroots movement started by a Kansas native was implemented on an international scale. And Kansas agriculture remains an active participant in the U.S. Food for Peace program. This week, Marsha Boswell takes a closer look at that food aid effort.

Track29  (3:00)  Q...for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
RECORD-BREAKING LOWS IN JULY
There has been a lot of talk about the unusually cool weather in Kansas this month—but K-State climatologist Mary Knapp says we were a long ways off from record-setting temperatures.

Track30  (:58)  Q...Research and Extension.
MUD STORMS?
Many of us have seen unusual weather combinations, such as winter storms that combine rain, sleet and snow. K-State climatologist Mary Knapp says there’s another rare occurrence during warmer months to look out for.

Track31  (:49)  Q...Research and Extension.
WIND GLOSSARY
The climate element most often associated with the state of Kansas is the wind. K-State climatologist Mary Knapp offers this brief refresher on common wind terms.

Track32  (:47)  Q...Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
DEALING WITH PTSD
For some time the stories of soldiers returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder have filled the news. For one scholar those stories on P-T-S-D merely haunt the veneer of a much deeper problem for American society. On today’s Perspective program two experts take different approaches to P-T-S-D, not just in its diagnosis and treatment, but also in what it means to our national self-image. Guests: Jerry Lembcke, an associate professor emeritus of sociology at Holy Cross College in Massachusetts. Author of P-T-S-D: Diagnosis and Identity in Post-empire America; The Splitting Image: Myth, Memory, and the Legacy of Vietnam; and Hanoi Jane: War, Sex, and Fantasies of Betrayal. Brianna Nelson Goff, a professor of Family Studies and Human Services, and director of Kansas State University’s Institute for the Health and Security of Military Families

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.