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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   12/15/2014...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
VETERINARY SERVICES ECONOMICS


Track1  (3:01)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
K-STATE RANCH MANAGEMENT SERIES


Track2  (3:02)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
GRAIN SORGHUM PERFORMANCE


Track3  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
VETERINARY SERVICES ECONOMICS
A recent guest speaker at K-State’s agricultural economics department, Michael Dicks, is the director of the new veterinary economics division of the American Veterinary Medical Association. He talked about the current economic situation and outlook of veterinary practices. A veterinary education is extremely costly to a student, sometimes leaving them with a significant amount of debt. Dicks says this can be a hindrance to veterinary graduates entering the profession, especially those starting a food animal practice.

Track4  (:40)  Q…a practicing veterinarian.
Food animal veterinarians continue to specialize in certain health areas, which may actually diminish their income potential.

Track5  (:36)  Q…doesn't do anymore.
Dicks says that new veterinarians should consider expanding their capabilities to offer a wider variety of services to therefore increase their business income. In the long-run, this will benefit the veterinarian, by being able to pay of student loans at a faster rate.

Track6  (:32)  Q...to get to that.

Tag:That was a recent speaker at K-State, economist Michael Dicks of the American Veterinary Medical Association, talking about current economic challenges facing new veterinarians.
K-STATE RANCH MANAGEMENT SERIES
Beef producers can learn more about successfully expanding their herds by attending one of K-State’s series of Winter Ranch Management Seminars taking place soon across the state. K-State cow-calf specialist Bob Weaber (WEB-uhr) will take part in this series to help answer producers’ questions about replacement heifer development, as well as a wide range of cow-calf management subjects.

Track7  (:42)  Q…these replacement heifers.
The seminars will focus on discussions concerning expanding the cow herd, with the information provided by a team of K-State beef cattle specialists.

Track8  (:36)  Q...prices looking forward.
Weaber says producers should consider attending a program local to them, where they will be able to learn about herd management opportunities created by good economic returns recently.

Track9  (:31)  Q…current calf prices.

Tag:That was K-State’s Bob Weaber, sharing more information about this year’s series of Winter Ranch Management Seminars hosted by K-State across the state in January. For more information, contact your local Extension office or visit, www.ksre.ksu.edu.
GRAIN SORGHUM PERFORMANCE
All in all, it was a very good year for grain sorghum production in the state of Kansas…as evidenced by the results of K-State’s 2014 Grain Sorghum Performance Test. The yield numbers for all the hybrids entered in those field trials have now been tabulated, and are available for growers for their review. K-State agronomist Jane Lingenfelser (LING-en-FELL-zer) oversees the university’s crop performance tests at multiple locations around Kansas. Here, she summarizes the hybrids that rose to the top in this year’s grain sorghum test plots, starting with eastern Kansas.

Track10  (:45)  Q…did well in the southeast.
The yield numbers in the central Kansas test locations were quite good as well.

Track11  (:34)  Q...in the central region.
As for the dryland results in western Kansas, Lingenfelser singles out the following hybrids as top performers.

Track12  (:31)  Q...in the western region.

Tag:The full report on K-State’s 2014 Grain Sorghum Performance Test can be obtained through your local Extension office or from the K-State agronomy web site: www.agronomy.ksu.edu. That’s K-State agronomist Jane Lingenfelser.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
VIDEO GAMING OVERTAKES TV WATCHING
The holiday break allows students an opportunity to catch their breath and spend more time with family and friends. However, they’ll eventually become bored. Typically that leads to watching TV or playing video games. Kansas State University recently completed a health needs assessment for Kansas adolescents. K-State Research and Extension youth development specialist Elaine Johannes (joh-HAN-ess) directed the study. As part of the project, Johannes says they looked at annual data that was collected for the Kansas Department of Health.

Track13  (:59)  Q...to occupy time.
TOO MUCH GAMING CAN POSE A DANGER
Johannes says a study published this year by the American Academy of Pediatrics tracks electronic gaming use and psycho-social adjustment – meaning how well adjusted is that teen to be with friends, to work in groups, to navigate school well, or to get a job or hold that job.

Track14  (1:01)  Q...puts that child in danger.
GAMING IS GOING ON OUTSIDE THE HOME
Johannes says one surprising finding from the assessment conducted in Kansas is that gaming is no longer limited to home.

Track15  (:45)  Q...between things in school.
LOOK FOR SIGNS OF GAMING ADDICTION
There is a growing national concern about addiction to video gaming – especially among teenagers and young adults. If you have concerns about the amount of time your child spends playing video games, Johannes says there are warning signs that help to identify an addiction.

Track16  (:55)  Q...accumulation of those.
RESEARCH VIDEO GAMES BEFORE BUYING
If you’re planning to buy video games as gifts this year, Johannes says to familiarize yourself with the rating system for those games and then research the games your kids want to determine if they’re age-appropriate.

Track17  (1:00)  Q...to occupy their time.

Tag:More information on adolescent health issues is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
LAWN TRAFFIC DAMAGE
As home lawns have mostly gone dormant for the winter, folks might think that no harm can come to that lawn grass now. That’s not exactly the case, according to Research and Extension turfgrass specialist Jared Hoyle of K-State. Especially when there’s frost on that lawn, foot or vehicle traffic can do considerable damage to the grass.

Track18  (1:07)  Q...that turf to recover.
PERMANENT LAWN DAMAGE
As a matter of fact, repeated traffic over a given part of the lawn during the winter can lead to permanent damage to the turfgrass…during the winter as well as the summer. Hoyle says that damage is manifested a couple of way.

Track19  (:53)  Q...and in the summertime.
WARM-SEASON LAWN DAMAGE
Of course, warm-season lawns like buffalograss and zoysia are completely dormant during the winter. That doesn’t mean that they’re immune to foot or vehicle traffic damage, says Hoyle…although that damage differs a bit from that to cool-season grasses.

Track20  (:46)  Q...during the summertime.
WINTER TURFGRASS COLORANTS
Many homeowners prefer warm-season turfgrass because of its low maintenance requirements during the heat and dryness of summer. The downside is that warm-season grasses go dormant and stay brown for a long time during the fall and winter. Now, says Hoyle, there are commercial products available to add color to that turf during this stretch.

Track21  (1:14)  Q...that warm-season turf.
SAFE COLORANT PRODUCTS
As to whether winter colorant applications to warm-season lawns is safe for the grass, that’s not an issue at all, according to Hoyle. Still, he advises homeowners to use a professional service for applying those treatments.

Track22  (1:26)  Q...anything else green, as well.
KANSAS PROFILE
ANNIE WILSON – HOLIDAYS
Ron Wilson of K-State’s Huck Boyd Institute looks at the music of a rural Kansan who immortalizes the Flint Hills through music---including a song for the holidays.

Track23  (4:24)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
DAIRY AIR QUALITY
If one’s dairy calves are persistently suffering from respiratory ills or are otherwise unhealthy while indoors, the cause could be as simple as a lack of fresh air. Many dairy producers overlook this, says K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook). This week, he talks about taking steps to remedy that problem.

Track24  (1:59)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
POCKET GOPHER CONTROL
Harmless as they may seem, pocket gophers can wreak havoc in alfalfa fields and with drip irrigation systems. Trapping and rodenticide use are the two main means of controlling pocket gophers. And a recent study illustrated how important proper training is to succeeding with either of those methods. K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee takes a closer look at that research this week.

Track25  (4:59)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
IS VIDEO GAMING BECOMING ADDICTIVE?
The holiday break provides students an opportunity to catch their breath and spend time with family and friends. However, boredom is bound to set in. Typically that leads to watching television and playing a lot of video games. K-State Research and Extension youth development specialist Elaine Johannes (joe-han-us) project director of the recently-completed Kansas Adolescent Health Community Input Survey, says the interviews they conducted with nearly 400 Kansas teenagers revealed that boys and girls are not only playing video games at home, they’re also playing them away from home on their cell phones and tablets. Johannes says too much video gaming every day can have negative consequences.

Track26  (14:52)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
FIREWOOD PEST CAUTIONS
Burning firewood is not only an energy-efficient way to heat a dwelling. It also contributes to good woodland management, according to K-State forester Bob Atchison. Still, those who cut, transport and store firewood need to be cautious about at least one damaging wood-borne insect species.

Track27  (2:01)  Q…(theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)


Track28  (1:56)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
JAPANESE WHEAT MARKET
It’s consistently one of the most reliable customers for U.S.-grown wheat…and that business shows no signs of letting up. Marsha Boswell provides an update on wheat sales to Japan in this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (2:59)  Q…for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
FREEZING RAIN
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp explains how freezing rain forms.

Track30  (:55)  Q…Research and Extension.
PINEAPPLE EXPRESS
Pacific moisture can create unseasonably wet weather in Kansas this time of year, according to K-State climatologist Mary Knapp.

Track31  (:56)  Q…Research and Extension.
MOISTURE CONTENT OF SNOW
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp says that there are two main ways to measure how much water is in snow.

Track32  (:47)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
FARM AND RANCH SUCCESSION
One of the more widely discussed agricultural topics in Kansas these days concerns how to properly create a farm or ranch succession from one generation to another. This is a very important venture not only for the agricultural families involved, but also for the communities around those farms and ranches. After the first of the year, Kansas State will host five workshops around the state on succession planning…they will take place at Allen Community College in Iola, Pratt Community College in Pratt, Kansas Farm Bureau Plaza in Manhattan, Flint Hills Technical College in Emporia, and the Kansas State Agricultural Research Center in Hayes. Guests are Greg Hadley, Assistant Director of Extension for Agriculture and Natural Resources programs; Charlotte Shoup Olson, Research and Extension Family Systems specialist; Duane Hund, Director of the Farm Analyst Program in the Department of Agricultural Economics; and Eric Atkinson, Agricultural Director, K-State Radio Network.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.