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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   04/18/0014...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
B-Q-A ONLINE TRAINING


Track1  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
INSECTS AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE


Track2  (3:01)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
K-STATE SHEEP AND GOAT CONFERENCE


Track3  (3:01)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
B-Q-A ONLINE TRAINING
Beef Quality Assurance training is a means of ensuring quality products and food safety on the part of beef producers. K-State feedlot nutritionist Chris Reinhardt (RYN-heart) reminds beef producers of the opportunities to become B-Q-A certified through formalized training. This training, that covers a wide variety of animal health and well-being topics, is available online at the convenience of the producer.

Track4  (:45)  Q…doing things well.
By taking this training online, Reinhardt says producers are able to complete it at their own pace.

Track5  (:51)  Q...out over time.
At the completion each of the 30 individual modules, producers will be confirmed B-Q-A certified.

Track6  (:23)  Q...training in BQA.

Tag:That was K-State’s Chris Reinhardt, encouraging beef producers to take the initiative and become B-Q-A certified by completing the training online at one’s convenience.
INSECTS AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE
Antibiotic resistance is a major topic currently, in the field of human health. A new K-State study contributes to the scientific evidence that antibiotic resistant bacteria can be carried from various sources into urban environments. And those sources can include livestock production facilities. K-State entomologist Ludek Zurek is a co-author of this new research…the results of which are important to food animal agriculture.

Track7  (:31)  Q…resistance came from.
Zurek’s research showed that insects carrying these bacteria are indeed finding a way back into urban areas.

Track8  (:59)  Q...surrounding urban areas.
But this study confirmed that these bacteria are being transported from locations other than just livestock facilities…including wastewater treatment facilities.

Track9  (:32)  Q…shown exactly that.

Tag:That was K-State entomologist Ludek Zurek looking at the issue of antibiotic-resistant bacteria residing in livestock production facilities, and the role that insects play in moving that bacteria around.
K-STATE SHEEP AND GOAT CONFERENCE
The second K-State Sheep and Goat Conference will be held Friday, May 2nd through Sunday the 4th at the K-State Sheep and Meat Goat Center and Weber Hall on campus. K-State’s Brian Faris (fair-us) is the coordinator of this conference, and gives a full preview of the planned schedule. This biennial event offers a great deal of information for producers attending.

Track10  (:36)  Q…at this conference.
Producers will hear from different speakers throughout the weekend, as well as sessions focusing on commercial, purebred, show animal, and other production systems.

Track11  (:45)  Q...of explain that.
Producers can register at any time and are still welcome to attend, even if one must miss part of the conference.

Track12  (:42)  Q...that we have.

Tag:That was K-State sheep and meat goat specialist Brain Faris, highlighting the 2014 K-State Sheep and Goat Conference. For more information or to register, please visit: www.ksusheepandgoats.org.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
THE COST OF IMPULSE BUYING
According to the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics report, the average retail costs of such staples like fish, poultry and eggs have climbed by double digits over the last 12 months and items like beef have skyrocketed. With punishing droughts and rising global demand, there’s no way to know if and when prices will begin to fall. As a result, it may be time to make some adjustments to our eating and shopping habits. K-State Research and Extension nutrition specialist Mary Meck Higgins says that most consumers can save a lot simply by using a shopping list to reduce impulse buying.

Track13  (:18)  Q...dollars a year.
NAME BRANDS DO COST MORE
If you typically buy name brand products, Higgins says you can save about 40% by switching to either the generic brand or the store brand…and you probably won’t notice much difference.

Track14  (:45)  Q...taste the difference.

Tag:If there are name brand products you just can’t live without, Higgins suggests looking for manufacturer, store or online coupons for those products and then using them at a store that doubles or triples coupons.
HOW MUCH MEAT DO YOU NEED?
The most expensive item on the shopping list is usually meat. One of the most common mistakes consumers make is buying too much meat for each meal…increasing the overall cost. Higgins says determining how much meat to buy varies, depending on the leanness of the meat.

Track15  (:36)  Q...quite a bit of it.
KEEP THE BASICS IN THE HOUSE
Another money-saving strategy is to keep the pantry, refrigerator and freezer supplied with basic foods. If you do that, Higgins says you’ll always have something that can be fixed in a hurry that’s good for you.

Track16  (:36)  Q...fruits and vegetables.
THE BENEFITS OF A PRICE BOOK
Although it takes some time and effort to set up a price book, Higgins says it saves consumers money on frequently purchased items, such as milk, bread, and peanut butter.

Track17  (:27)  Q...be less expensive.

Tag:More information on nutrition and managing food costs is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
FREEZE DAMAGE TO FRUIT TREES
Fruit growers often wonder at what temperatures fruit buds are killed. This curiosity has been heightened by the hard freeze that hit Kansas last week. K-State horticulturist Ward Upham (up-umm) says any of the fruit trees that were in full bloom are probably lost for the season.

Track18  (1:01)  Q...thin the fruit.
CHECKING FOR FRUIT BUD DAMAGE
If you aren’t sure whether last week’s freeze damaged your fruit trees, Upham says there’s an easy way to check for fruit bud damage.

Track19  (:51)  Q...you can leave.
A HEAVY FRUIT CROP NEXT YEAR
While this year’s late freeze appears to be bad news for peach and apricot growers, Upham says next year – barring another late freeze – should be a banner year for peaches and apricots.

Track20  (:22)  Q...eliminate the crop.

Tag:More information on fruit bud damage is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu by clicking on the link for Lawn and Garden.
TIME TO PINCH OFF THE BLOSSOMS
Spring-bearing strawberry plants that were set out this spring should have blossoms pinched off. K-State horticulturist Ward Upham (up-umm) says new plants have a limited amount of energy and that energy needs to be used for developing runners.

Track21  (:53)  Q...the next year.
TIPS FOR SPRING-FLOWERING BULBS
As spring-flowering bulbs go through the flowering process, there are several care tips to keep in mind. K-State horticulturist Ward Upham (up-umm) says the first tip is not to remove the foliage – let it die naturally.

Track22  (:48)  Q...back into that bulb.

Tag:More lawn and garden information is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
KANSAS PROFILE
HAVENSVILLE LIVING HISTORY DAY
A special event to educate grade school children and bring local history to life in a rural community is marking its 30th anniversary. Ron Wilson, director of the Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development at Kansas State University, details the annual spring tradition which is helping hundreds of school children celebrate and learn about our state’s rich history.

Track23  (4:19)  Q...with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
PREVENTING DRY PERIOD INFECTIONS
Research indicates that about two-thirds of the infections seen in fresh animals in the dairy herd actually develop during the dry period. K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook) offers several tips dairy producers can follow to prevent new infections during the dry cow period.

Track24  (2:00)  Q...(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
KANGAROO RAT DAMAGE
While they won’t wipe out an entire no-till crop field, kangaroo rats can create severe spot damage in such fields. Crop residue provides ideal cover and habitat for these rodents, according to K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee. This week, he goes over how to employ an effective toxicant product against kangaroo rats, especially in newly planted no-till corn.

Track25  (5:00)  Q...(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
WAYS TO LOWER FOOD COSTS
According to the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics report, the average retail costs of such staples like fish, poultry and eggs have climbed by double digits over the last 12 months and items like beef have skyrocketed. With punishing droughts and rising global demand, there’s no way to know if and when prices will begin to fall. As a result, it may be time to make some adjustments to our eating and shopping habits. K-State Research and Extension nutrition specialist Mary Meck Higgins outlines five strategies to reduce food costs.

Track26  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
WALNUTS IN THE WILD WEST
The Kansas Forest Service, Kansas Chapter of the Walnut Council and the Kansas Forestry Association are hosting the 2014 National Walnut Council Meeting in June in Manhattan. The meeting will feature nationally recognized and local experts in the growth, culture and utilization of black walnut and other fine quality hardwoods. Forester Bob Atchison previews the meeting and how to register to attend.

Track27  (2:00)  Q...(theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)


Track28  (1:56)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
CONDITION OF WINTER WHEAT
Crop conditions around Kansas vary as the weather turns warmer and the delicate growing season for winter wheat is underway. Freeze damage and drought are a major concern for many areas of the state. The crop is battling ranging temperatures and lack of moisture. According to Guorong Zhang, wheat breeder at the K-State Agricultural Research Center at Hays, about one-third of fields do not have a very good stand, with many showing drought stress. He reported that while a few varieties have shown signs of winterkill, it is only a small percentage. Marsha Boswell has more.

Track29  (2:57)  Q...for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
HAVE WE SEEN THE LAST FREEZE?
Despite one freeze earlier this month, there is still a chance we could see another before warmer weather finally sets in. K-State climatologist Mary Knapp looks at some of the latest freezes that have occurred across Kansas.

Track30  (:58)  Q...Research and Extension.
WHY IS THERE FROST UP THERE?
If cold air is supposed to sink, why was there frost on the roof, but not on the ground? K-State climatologist Mary Knapp says there are actually several explanations – including that the ground is much warmer than the air.

Track31  (:41)  Q...Research and Extension.
HOW WARM CAN IT GET IN APRIL?
So far, this April has been cooler than average. However, K-State climatologist Mary Knapp says Kansas has experienced some very hot temperatures in April. In 1989, she says there was a day that recorded the warmest temperature in the nation.

Track32  (:38)  Q...Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
RACE IN EDUCATION
The struggle for racial equality, for racial justice in the United States is one that has been in the works since the eighteen-hundreds. Despite that long history, a lot of work remains to be done. And much of that work needs to take place in how we educate our children. One educational expert says we need to highlight the social, political and economic factors that have disproportionately affected children of color in our schools. Guest: Gloria Ladson-Billings is a pedagogical theorist and assistant vice chancellor of academic affairs at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She is the author of two critically acclaimed books: The Dreamkeepers: Successful Teachers of African American Children and Crossing Over to Canaan: The Journey of New Teachers in Diverse Classrooms.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.