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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   08/03/2015...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
INTENSIVE BEEF GRAZING
A question some beef producers might be asking is if intensive grazing is better than conventional grazing. Agriculture Today’s Charlsie (CHAHRL-see) Craig talks with a K-State rangeland scientist about his research on this matter and what he suggest is best.

Track1  (2:58)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
CORN INSECT DAMAGE
Kansas corn producers may be asking why the silks of their corn are disappearing, and two insects may be the ones to blame for this growing problem. Agriculture Today’s Michelle Keyes talks with a K-State entomologist about this issue.

Track2  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
BACON QUALITY RESEARCH
Bacon continues to be one of the most popular meats on the market. Agriculture Today’s Michelle Keyes talks with a K-State meat scientist about a study being done to extend the quality of bacon frozen for storage.

Track3  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
SOYBEAN YIELD APP
Having a quick, portable method of estimating the potential yield of a soybean stand can provide the grower useful information for their management purposes. K-State Research and Extension has just released such a tool for grower use: a soybean yield calculator app for smartphones. Agriculture Today’s Eric Atkinson visits with one of its creators.

Track4  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
SOYBEAN PLANT ANALYSIS
Analytical data from soybean plant samples can be used to diagnose existing nutrient problems, predict nutrient problems likely to affect the crop production between sampling and harvest, and monitor crop nutrient status for optimal crop production. Agriculture Today’s Charlsie Craig talks with a K-State Research and Extension crop nutrition specialist about soybean plant analysis.

Track5  (2:58)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
THE COST OF THROWING AWAY FOOD
Throwing away food is like throwing away money. On average, Americans throw away 14 percent of the food they buy. If a family has a weekly food budget of $100, they’ll spend $5,200 a year on food. Assuming a 14 percent waste rate occurs – that family spends $728 a year for food they don’t eat. K-State Research and Extension human nutrition specialist Mary Meck Higgins says that is almost two months of food that’s wasted.

Track6  (:23)  Q...more than seven weeks.
FOOD WASTE ON A PERSONAL LEVEL
The reasons to reduce food waste in the United States typically fall into two categories: personal and environmental. Higgins says personal reasons include saving time and money, while environmental reasons are generally aimed at protecting our natural resources.

Track7  (:21)  Q…more than carbon dioxide.
REDUCE FOOD WASTE, BUT BE SAFE
While the goal is to reduce food waste, Higgins says that doesn’t mean eating food that is no longer safe.

Track8  (:22)  Q...is not worth it.
HOW CAN YOU REDUCE FOOD WASTE?
Fresh fruits and vegetables, bread and other bakery products, drinks, dairy products, eggs, meat, and fish are among the foods most likely to be wasted. However, there are steps consumers can take to reduce food waste, starting with just buying what they need and using what they have. Higgins says that includes buying more non-perishable food, putting smaller food portions on the plate and eating what you already have in the house.

Track9  (:21)  Q…for future meals.
SMALL CHANGES MAKE A DIFFERENCE
Putting leftovers from supper into reusable containers to eat for lunch the next day, using leftovers from one meal in a different recipe for a second or third meal, using food before its expiration date, and composting plant-based food scraps to use as a soil amendment in the garden or yard are other ways to reduce food waste. If that sounds overwhelming, Higgins says you don’t have to do it all at once.

Track10  (:18)  Q…that is avoidable.

Tag:More information on reducing food waste, managing food costs and menu planning is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
KANSAS PROFILE
KENT CORNISH – BROADCASTERS
Ron Wilson of K-State’s Huck Boyd Institute introduces us to a radio and TV veteran who is providing leadership to the broadcast stations of Kansas.

Track11  (4:22)  Q...with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
HARVESTING CORN SILAGE
Timing is everything when it comes to putting up quality corn silage for the dairy operation. By the observations of K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook), many corn fields are near the silage harvest stage. This week, he reminds dairy producers of the dry matter target they should shoot for when cutting silage.

Track12  (1:57)  Q...(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
SUMMER FISH KILLS
Conditions so far this summer have been ripe for fish kills in farm ponds. Lack of available oxygen in the water is the culprit, and several factors lead to that. As K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee explains this week, pond owners can take steps to minimize these fish kills, but these must be taken proactively.

Track13  (4:59)  Q...(theme music).
PERSPECTIVE
THE WELL-BEING OF U.S. CHILDREN
Some one-point-seven million more children live in low-income working families today that during the Great Recession. According to the newly released 20-15 KIDS COUNT Data Book from the Annie. E. Casey Foundation, in 2013, one in four children, that’s eighteen-point-seven million, lived in a low-income working family in the United States. And the report says even when parents are working full time, wages and benefits are often not sufficient to adequately support a family.

Track14  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
LAWN AND GARDEN
LAWN BROWN PATCH
It’s one of the hot topics in lawn management around Kansas right now…the outbreak of brown patch disease in fescue lawns. It’s a product of the warm and moist summer to date, as discussed this week by K-State horticultural disease specialist Jared Hoyle. He talks about what homeowners can do in response to brown patch showing up in their lawns.

Track15  (4:58)  Q...(theme music).
SOUND LIVING
THE COST OF THROWING AWAY FOOD
Throwing away food is like throwing away money. On average, Americans throw away 14 percent of the food they buy. If a family has a weekly food budget of $100, they’ll spend $5,200 a year on food. Assuming a 14 percent waste rate occurs – that family spends $728 a year for food they don’t eat. K-State Research and Extension human nutrition specialist Mary Meck Higgins discusses how consumers can reduce their food waste, lower food costs and help protect the environment.

Track16  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
“SMOKEY” BEAR BIRTHDAY
Smokey Bear is a widely-recognized symbol for wildfire prevention who appeals to kids and adults alike. This week, K-State forester Charles Barden shares the history of this educational character, who is still going strong after debuting over seven decades ago.

Track17  (2:01)  Q...(theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)


Track18  (1:56)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WEATHER WONDERS
DUST AND RAIN
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp (nap) tells how dust storms can combine with thunderstorms.

Track19  (:57)  Q...K-State Research and Extension.
WIND DIRECTION
Sometimes confusing terms for wind direction are explained by K-State climatologist Mary Knapp.

Track20  (:53)  Q...K-State Research and Extension.
WIND SPEED
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp defines the differences between different ways of measuring wind speed.

Track21  (:51)  Q...K-State Research and Extension.
WHEAT SCOOP
WHEAT YIELD CONTEST
The results are now in, on the 2015 Kansas Wheat Yield Contest. And despite the various adversities of this past growing season, the winners posted some eye-popping yield numbers. Marsha Boswell has the story on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track22  (2:57)  Q...I'm Marsha Boswell.



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