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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   07/24/0014...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
K-STATE RISK AND PROFIT CONFERENCE


Track1  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
SHUTTLE LOADING IMPACTS


Track2  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
CANOLA PRODUCTION LESSONS


Track3  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
K-STATE RISK AND PROFIT CONFERENCE
K-State’s agricultural economics department is hosting the 2014 Risk and Profit Conference in the latter part of August. The intent of this annual conference is to provide an update of the economic situation affecting the agricultural sector. K-State agricultural economist Allen Featherstone highlights the keynote speaker, who will examine the influence of China on the U.S. agricultural economy.

Track4  (:35)  Q…the agricultural sector.
Also speaking at the conference will be a Kansas crop and pork producer, Michael Springer. He will discuss his personal operation and current challenges he as a producer is facing.

Track5  (:29)  Q...be very insightful.
A variety of topics will be offered in breakout sessions, conducted by K-State agricultural economists. Featherstone describes some of the subjects to be covered.

Track6  (:38)  Q...grain market outlook.

Tag:That was K-State’s Allen Featherstone giving a brief description of the schedule of events to be covered at the 2014 Risk and Profit Conference in Manhattan. For more information please visit www.agmanager.info.
SHUTTLE LOADING IMPACTS
In recent years, grain elevators that can rapidly load 100-car shuttle trains have been put into service around Kansas. And a recent guest speaker at Kansas State University has conducted a study of those facilities, and how they impact the prices area farmers receive for their wheat. Montana State University agricultural economist Anton Bekkerman (BECK-er-man) shared the results of his study while at K-State.

Track7  (:45)  Q…that come around.
Bekkerman says demand, supply and competition are the main deciding factors in constructing a shuttle loading facility in a new wheat production area.

Track8  (:44)  Q...most important ones.
Bekkerman’s research shows that by installing a shuttle loading facility, the local wheat price basis will improve.

Track9  (:30)  Q…conventional loading facility.

Tag:That was Montana State agricultural economist Anton Bekkerman, who spoke at K-State recently about the impact of wheat shuttle loading facilities on local wheat prices in Kansas.
CANOLA PRODUCTION LESSONS
Similar to the difficulties in winter wheat production this year, it was a less-than-ideal growing season for canola in Kansas. Nonetheless, the interest in growing this oilseed as part of a cropping system is on the rise. And a K-State canola agronomist says that lessons were learned from this year’s production. Mike Stamm (Stahm) points out that canola yields this year were highly variable.

Track10  (:22)  Q...rains at flowering.
Stamm says that, despite the uneven production this year, producers are sticking with canola, having found it to be a beneficial addition to their crop rotations.

Track11  (:48)  Q...high for the crop.
And the adversities of this growing season have helped sort out strengths and weaknesses of the different canola varieties, which can be helpful information to the grower.

Track12  (:45)  Q...and oil content.

Tag:K-State canola agronomist Mike Stamm. Results from K-State 2014 canola field trials can be found at www.agronomy.ksu.edu.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
WAITING LONGER TO HAVE CHILDREN
According to a government report, the number of babies born last year rose by about 4,700 – the first annual increase since 2007. The nation’s economy, which was in a recession from 2007 to 2009 and shaky for several years after that, had received most of the blame for the downward trend in birth rates. Now the economy has started to pick up and so has child bearing – at least in women ages 30 and older. The birth rate for women in their early 30s inched up in 2012 for the first time since 2007 and rose again last year by one percent. The birth rate for women in their late 30s and early 40s rose by three percent in 2012 and another one percent last year. In addition to the downturn in the economy, K-State Research and Extension child development specialist Bradford Wiles says many women have other reasons for having children later in life.

Track13  (:40)  Q...they do that.
WHEN DOES PARENTING REALLY BEGIN?
Parenting is typically thought of as something that happens after the baby is born. However, Wiles says parenting should start much earlier.

Track14  (:41)  Q...to negotiate.
ARE YOUR PARENTING STYLES SIMILAR?
When it comes to parenting styles, Wiles says new parents generally rely on what they were taught by their parents when they were kids. However, others will essentially do the exact opposite of whatever their parents did.

Track15  (:48)  Q...there is consistency.
CHILDREN WILL INFLUENCE YOUR STYLE
For growing families, Wiles encourages parents to remember that each child is unique and that a parenting style that worked well with one child may not work with another.

Track16  (:40)  Q...to each child.
DON’T NEGLECT OTHER RELATIONSHIPS
While babies require a lot of love and attention, the parents relationship needs to continue to exist after they have a child. In the U.S., we often get so obsessed with our children that we neglect our other relationships. Wiles says this can actually have a negative impact on the developing baby.

Track17  (1:00)  Q...make things difficult.

Tag:More information on parenting and parenting styles is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
STRESSED TURF
During these “dog days” of summer, lawn grass can endure great stress. K-State turfgrass specialist Jared Hoyle says the stress can be caused by a variety of things, one of which can be an overly-thick layer of thatch interfering with moisture uptake.

Track18  (:51)  Q...a day or two.
MANAGING THATCH
Hoyle says the best time to manage thatch in cool-season lawns is in the fall, either by verti-cutting or aerating the lawn.

Track19  (:23)  Q...able to reseed.
HOW THATCH DEVELOPS
As for how thatch develops in the home lawn, Hoyle points to a couple of possibilities.

Track20  (:51)  Q...is the fall time.
REMOVING THATCH
The most common means of breaking up heavy thatch in the lawn are using a verti-cutter or a core aerator. Either one will generally work, according to Hoyle, but he offers this added advice.

Track21  (:54)  Q...solution for that.
BENEFITS OF AERATION
There are reasons other than thatch management for aerating a lawn, as Hoyle points out. And he adds that homeowners can live with a little thatch, if need be.

Track22  (:39)  Q...the turf system.

Tag:More lawn and garden information at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
KANSAS PROFILE
TAD FELTS (PART ONE)
Because of his passion for small-town radio over several decades, one highly-decorated broadcaster has become an invaluable pillar of his north-central Kansas community. The director of the Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development, Ron Wilson, tells the first of his two-part story on this week’s program.

Track23  (4:26)  Q...with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
KANSAS JUNIOR DAIRY SHOW
The annual Kansas Junior Dairy Show takes place August 14-16 in Salina. K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (Brook) outlines the schedule of events offered for the exhibitors at the show. To get registered or for more information, visit www.asi.k-state.edu.

Track24  (2:00)  Q...(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
BIRD-VEHICLE COLLISIONS
The number of bird losses resulting from vehicle collisions is staggering. However, putting an accurate count on those losses has historically proven difficult. A recent research review attempted to quantify those losses and why they occur. K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee talks about those findings.

Track25  (5:00)  Q...(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
A DISCUSSION ABOUT HAVING CHILDREN
According to a government report, the number of babies born last year rose by about 4,700 – the first annual increase since 2007. Experts have been blaming the downward trend mainly on the nation’s economy, which was in recession from 2007 to 2009 and shaky for several years after that. Now the economy has started to pick up and so has child bearing – at least in women ages 30 and older. On today’s Sound Living: K-State Research and Extension child development specialist Bradford Wiles discusses how parenting begins long before the baby is conceived.

Track26  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
WOODLAND MANAGEMENT FUND
The Environmental Quality Incentives Program is now providing financial assistance to producers who are looking to make improvements and renovations to their woodlands. K-State forester Bob Atchison covers the eligibility requirements for receiving E-Q-I-P funds for these purposes.

Track27  (2:00)  Q...(theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)


Track28  (1:49)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
WHEAT U
Kansas Wheat’s annual meeting and the High Plains Journal’s “Wheat U” will take place on August 4 and 5 in Wichita. These are free events for any wheat producer or other interested party to attend, but they ask that one register in advance. Marsha Boswell has more.

Track29  (2:56)  Q...for Kansas Wheat.
WEATHER WONDERS
NO RECORD HEAT
Despite a run of hot days recently, this month of July is well short of record heat…in fact, just the opposite. K-State climatologist Mary Knapp has the details.

Track30  (:57)  Q...Research and Extension.
METEOR WATCHING
The month of August provides an excellent opportunity to take advantage of the wide-open Kansas night sky, and enjoy meteor watching. K-State climatologist Mary Knapp talks about how to make the most of that.

Track31  (:49)  Q...Research and Extension.
STRAY LIGHTNING
Occasionally, lightning can stray far away from the actual storm. In fact, as K-State climatologist Mary Knapp reports, lightning strikes can occur even under a fully clear sky.

Track32  (:58)  Q...Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
THE KIDS COUNT DATA BOOK
The Annie E. Casey Foundation has just released the 25th edition of its annual KIDS COUNT Data book. The yearly effort uses 16 indicators in four areas to examine the trends in how kids in the United States are faring…economic well-being, education, health, and family and community. The good news is that children continued to show improvement in the areas of education and health. However, economic progress still lags, even after the end of the recession. Guests: Laura Speer, associate director of Policy Reform and Advocacy at the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Shannon Cotsoradis, President and Chief Executive Officer of Kansas Action for Children.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.