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K-State Radio Network - Features for the week beginning   07/06/2015...


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AGRICULTURE FEATURES
CATTLE FOOTROT CONCERNS


Track1  (3:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
EPHEMERAL FIELD GULLIES


Track2  (3:03)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
FARM DEBT-TO-ASSET RATIOS


Track3  (2:59)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
AGRICULTURE SOUNDBITES
CATTLE FOOTROT CONCERNS
As the temperatures heat up, cattle will start to congregate around or in ponds or other standing water. Footrot is a common cause of lameness in beef cattle on pastures, which is related to wet soil conditions. The lameness can cause decreases in weight gain of young cattle and milk production decline of adult cows. Also, lame bulls will be reluctant to breed. K-State veterinarian Gregg Hanzlicek (HANZ-el-check) is here to talk about this footrot issue.

Track4  (:29)  Q…to become lacerated.
Hanzlicek talks about the signs of footrot and how bacteria get into the foot.

Track5  (:45)  Q...that footrot lesion.
There are many effective antibiotics for treating footrot. Hanzlicek expands on injectable, topical and oral treatments, noting that the injectable products may be the better option.

Track6  (:39)  Q...effective at all.

Tag:It’s always good to look over grass cattle for lameness when checking them. That was K-State veterinarian Gregg Hanzlicek, discussing footrot disease and the best way to treat it.
EPHEMERAL FIELD GULLIES
Many crop producers are aware of ephemeral gullies…ruts that are caused by the increase of water flows in crop fields, regardless of the drainage conditions of those fields. But many producers are not aware of the severe erosion these gullies cause, if left uncorrected. A water quality engineer with K-State Research and Extension, Aleksey Sheshukov (ah-LECK-see SHESH-you-koff), gives a more in-depth definition of an ephemeral gully.

Track7  (:35)  Q…of the state.
He then talks about the different factors that affect the severity of gully development.

Track8  (:47)  Q...odd ephemeral gullies.
There are many different things that can be done to reduce the number of ephemeral gullies in fields. Sheshukov shares options farmers can consider.

Track9  (:39)  Q…the way to go.

Tag:That was K-State water quality engineer Aleksey Sheshukov, talking about the effects of ephemeral gullies in crop fields, and actions producers can take to correct that gully erosion.
FARM DEBT-TO-ASSET RATIOS
Farming can generate good profits if one plays their cards right, but it is an expensive profession. This leads to a lot of farmers contending with debt issues that can either sink or swim their operation. An agricultural economist with the Kansas Farm Management Association at K-State, Gregg Ibendahl (EYE-ben-doll) goes into more detail on where the debt-to-asset ratio of an operation should be in order to find lenders to fund expenses.

Track10  (:33)  Q…down the road.
He also explains why age might be a factor when comparing the debt-to-asset ratios of different farms.

Track11  (:43)  Q...to be higher there.
Ibendahl then states some strategies on how to keep the debt-to-asset ratio of a farm under control.

Track12  (:42)  Q...load under control.

Tag:That was K-State agricultural economist Gregg Ibendahl explaining the age gap between the debt-to-asset ratio of different farms, and sharing thoughts on successful debt management.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
SUMMER LEARNING LOSS IS HIGH
Summer learning loss is the loss in academic skills and knowledge over the course of summer vacation. Summer learning loss for all students is estimated to be about one month, but varies by subject. K-State Research and Extension child development specialist Bradford Wiles says summer can be a setback for children who are just learning some of the fundamental building blocks.

Track13  (:29)  Q...over the summer.
CHILDREN SHOULD KEEP READING
One of the best ways for children to stay mentally sharp during the summer is to continue to read. If children are involved in a local summer reading program, Wiles thinks there should be just as much emphasis on the quality of a book as there is on the number of books read.

Track14  (:46)  Q...books you have read.
WAYS TO MAINTAIN MATH SKILLS
In addition to reading, there are a number of other tools parents and caregivers can utilize to keep children engaged in learning. Wiles says this is especially true for children who want to maintain or improve their fundamental math skills.

Track15  (:44)  Q...next time they come in.
IT’S OKAY TO OFFER INCENTIVES
If your child isn’t very receptive to doing homework over the summer, it’s alright to offer them an incentive. This might include some extra spending money, more time to play sports or being able to go to a friend’s house. Wiles says the idea is to develop a system that rewards hard work.

Track16  (:38)  Q...that it's important.

Tag:Wiles cautions against using additional screen time, whether it’s the TV, computer, tablet or smartphone as an incentive. Because screen time is something that should be limited, it shouldn’t be offered as a reward.
CHILDREN LIKE APPLIED LEARNING
Not everything has to come from a book, computer or flash cards. Wiles says children can learn just as much making chocolate chip cookies as they would from studying math and science.

Track17  (:59)  Q...really delicious cookie.

Tag:More information on keeping children engaged in learning this summer is available at county and district Extension offices and on the Extension website: www.ksre.ksu.edu.
LAWN AND GARDEN
CICADA TREE DAMAGE
The 17-year cicadas are about finished with their noisy summer stint occupying oak trees. During their relatively short stay, they may have inflicted some damage to the trees. Not to worry, according to K-State horticultural entomologist Raymond Cloyd. That cicada damage is largely cosmetic, and poses no health threat to the oaks whatsoever.

Track18  (:57)  Q...direct damage to the tree.
FINAL BAGWORM CONTROL
Homeowners: the “last call” is going out for controlling bagworms on landscape conifers. Cloyd says that hopefully, people started treating their evergreens for bagworms several weeks ago, with regular follow-up treatments up to now. At this point, the treatment window is now closing, so he urges homeowners to make that final bagworm insecticide application right away.

Track19  (:35)  Q...going into July and August.
DISRUPTING MOSQUITE HABITAT
This has been a banner year for mosquito activity in backyards and other landscape areas. They’re a direct product of the wet weather, and the first defense against mosquitos is ridding of any standing water in the yard, according to Cloyd. Besides that, the best thing that one can do is to always use a repellant product when working or relaxing in the yard or garden.

Track20  (:52)  Q...from potential mosquito bites.
GALLS ON TREES
Upon his visits to numerous home landscapes recently, Cloyd has noted an unusual abundance of gall growth on hardwood trees this year, especially oaks. Like many other ills that have surfaced this year, this too can be attributed to wet weather.

Track21  (1:06)  Q...harm the tree in any way.
TIMELY GRUB CONTROL
If you’ve had a history of white grub damage to your lawn, now is the time to take preventative action, according to Cloyd. Grubs will begin aggressively feeding on grass roots soon, and if the lawn is already stressed by summer weather, the damage can be substantial.

Track22  (1:14)  Q...late spring or early summer.
KANSAS PROFILE
SHELLY HOYT – HOXIE BASKETBALL
Ron Wilson of K-State’s Huck Boyd Institute takes us on a visit to a small Kansas high school... with a sports team that topped a “best of” list in the “USA Today” newspaper.

Track23  (4:18)  Q…with Kansas Profile.
MILK LINES
CUTTING CORN “SHREDLEGE”
On most dairies, silage is a staple part of a dairy cow’s diet. Corn silage harvest time is coming up, and K-State dairy specialist Mike Brouk (brook) explains a new process for producing silage and how it can benefit dairies in the future.

Track24  (2:00)  Q…(theme music)
OUTBOUND KANSAS
BIRD COLLISION ESCAPES
Millions of birds are killed each year in roadway vehicle collisions. A recent study set out to measure the reaction time of birds to oncoming vehicles. And the results indicated that vehicle speed is, indeed, a major factor. K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee reviews the findings of this study and its implications.

Track25  (4:57)  Q…(theme music)
SOUND LIVING
MINIMIZE SUMMER LEARNING LOSS
Summer learning loss is the loss in academic skills and knowledge over the course of summer vacation. A common finding across numerous studies is that on average, students score lower on standardized tests at the end of the summer than at the beginning of the summer – even when taking the same test. K-State Research and Extension child development specialist Bradford Wiles says that keeping children engaged in education – in a variety of ways – can reduce summer learning loss.

Track26  (14:50)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
TREE TALES
ELM LEAF DAMAGE
Elm trees are a perfect shade tree on a sunny day, but they are vulnerable to leaf diseases caused by leaf beetles and elm flea weevils. K-State Research and Extension forester Ryan Armbrust shares ways to deal with these pests invading your elm trees.

Track27  (2:01)  Q…(theme music).
(same as above, but without music bed)


Track28  (1:55)  Q…K-State Radio Network.
WHEAT SCOOP
WHEAT HARVEST AND WEATHER
It’s been anything but a routine wheat harvest in Kansas this summer, thanks in large part to the vagaries of the weather. Marsha Boswell takes a closer look at that on this week’s Kansas Wheat Scoop.

Track29  (2:54)  Q...I'm Marsha Boswell.
WEATHER WONDERS
CAPPED INVERSION
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp (nap) explains how weather can quickly change.

Track30  (:52)  Q…Research and Extension.
DOG DAYS OF SUMMER
Astronomic observations led to an expression commonly used to describe hot summer days, according to K-State climatologist Mary Knapp.

Track31  (:53)  Q…Research and Extension.
THE RAINS OF 1993
K-State climatologist Mary Knapp compares recent heavy rainfall in Kansas to that of 22 years ago.

Track32  (1:05)  Q…Research and Extension.
PERSPECTIVE
CAN WE TEACH CITIZENSHIP?
In many of this nation’s schools teachers are working hard to prepare their students for tests….standardized tests that will query them over a narrow set of academic subjects. That effort concerns one professor and author who feels public education needs to not only transmit knowledge, but also prepare its students to utilize that knowledge in their role as citizens. The guest is Joel Westheimer of the University of Ottawa.

Track33  (27:00)  Q…K-State Radio Network.